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Author Topic: Markus Klinko - Fashion/Celebrity Workshop in LA  (Read 7506 times)
RyuuzakiJulio
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« on: May 25, 2013, 05:19:59 PM »
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Is he serious? In Smashbox? with the best LA models?

This is like the first serious workshop I had ever seen, by an epic photographer. I had followed his work since I started photography 6 years ago and his lighting setups are just amazing. And my portfolio could use some legit models from real agencies. Can't wait to be there.

Even the price, I've seen other guys charging up to 5k for their workshops but never of his caliber.

Check it out, hope to see some of you there!

http://markusklinkoworkshops.com/
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marvpelkey
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« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2013, 10:09:00 PM »
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Coincidently, I just watched an episode of Double Exposure, a reality show (couple years old now I think) about Klinko and Indrani.

I should actually say, I tried watching an episode. I saw the listing and turned it on with eager anticipation, hoping to see them actually working on a shoot, but had to turn it off after only 10 or so minutes.

Perhaps they were playing it up for the camera but I found both extremely immature and unprofessional. Like a couple of feuding, bratty children. They even had one of the stars of their shoot, shaking her head.

I realize they do good work, but sure didn't compel me to run out and sign up for one of their workshops.

Hopefully, your experience turns out a whole lot better.

Marv
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RyuuzakiJulio
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« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2013, 12:21:42 AM »
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Your answer is very well based. But I have talked to him directly. I have meet with him and he even let me grab his camera and even measure his double grip. He is far from the guy on the tv series. He is very cool and down to earth. We are all humans and have defects. But being an unpleasant person won't let you stand a few months in this industry. He has been up for 20 years. And his lighting skills are truly amazing. I assure you that show has nothing to do with who they are in real life.
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Rob C
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« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2013, 03:04:35 AM »
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How come these 'stars' find time for workshops?

Rob C
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RyuuzakiJulio
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« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2013, 03:08:12 AM »
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Because "stars" need less than 20 good shoots per year to make tons of money. Their price range has 5 figures sometimes even 6 figures.
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Rob C
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« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2013, 04:30:18 AM »
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Because "stars" need less than 20 good shoots per year to make tons of money. Their price range has 5 figures sometimes even 6 figures.


I have a leprechaun at the bottom of my garden; he never works more than he has to either, and that's because he's not greedy. He refuses to be drawn into accepting more than his fair share of what's going. He constantly turns down would-be clients - just look at his website. He's absolutely amazed to learn that 'stars' make so much money; he didn't know that before. Of course, he isn't a photographer like us, just a leprechaun.

;-)

Rob C
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Diana Dalsasso
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« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2013, 05:05:55 PM »
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I agree. There are a lot of photographers doing workshops out there, that are not even close to being on this level.

Put it this way. Just renting out equipment and a studio space in LA will cost you over $1500- not to mention professional hair/mu/wardrobe/models/catering/assistants etc...

To get all of that, with a master instructor like Markus to share his insight and technical knowledge of lighting and setups is an incredible opportunity. Plus you get to walk away with great additions to your portfolio.

I can only imagine that this will sell out really quickly!
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Diana Dalsasso
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« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2013, 05:16:45 PM »
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As far as Reality TV goes, I think we all know by now that clever editing and scriptwriting has a lot to do with keeping a show entertaining Wink It is Hollywood, after all.

In real life, Markus and Indrani are both exceptionally professional and are constantly giving back.
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leuallen
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« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2013, 06:40:35 PM »
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My wife was on a reality show. Boy, could they twist things.

Larry
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GWStudioLA
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« Reply #9 on: May 26, 2013, 10:48:07 PM »
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I have a leprechaun at the bottom of my garden; he never works more than he has to either, and that's because he's not greedy. He refuses to be drawn into accepting more than his fair share of what's going. He constantly turns down would-be clients - just look at his website. He's absolutely amazed to learn that 'stars' make so much money; he didn't know that before. Of course, he isn't a photographer like us, just a leprechaun.

;-)

Rob C

What are you smoking?? I would like some of that....
But in all seriousness, I believe Markus is a leprechaun because his work is magical  Cool
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Rob C
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« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2013, 01:18:04 AM »
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I so love a well-oiled publicity machine; it attracts brand new contributors to LuLa!

;-)

Rob C
« Last Edit: May 27, 2013, 03:32:28 AM by Rob C » Logged

TMARK
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« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2013, 12:43:52 PM »
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How much blow is included in the price of the workshop? 

OK, in all seriousness, its probably a good del, but take what he says with a grain of salt.  Meaning, 50% of what he says is bullshit.  Be skeptical.

If Indriani is there listen to her and watch what she does with the models and styling.  That is the real value.

To the OP, I hope you are going to the agencies directly and shooting new faces.  You have the skills.

Good luck and have fun.
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MarkL
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« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2013, 02:28:07 PM »
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How come these 'stars' find time for workshops?

Rob C

The same reasons 'name' photogs are shooting weddings - they need the money. Really no workshop is worth anywhere near $5k, not even if you got to shoot Coco Rocha but no doubt some rich amateurs will find the cash - at least he hasn't gone wild with the price tag

I am sceptical of most photog education especially after watching lots of creativeLIVE, a lot of what makes great fashion pictures are access to a great team and great models and a day or two of workshop is not going to get you that and transform your portfolio. At most you will get some idea of how xyz photog works and pictures that are the same as everyone else that attends which also don't match the rest of your work.
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GWStudioLA
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« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2013, 06:25:40 PM »
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I am sceptical of most photog education especially after watching lots of creativeLIVE, a lot of what makes great fashion pictures are access to a great team and great models and a day or two of workshop is not going to get you that and transform your portfolio. At most you will get some idea of how xyz photog works and pictures that are the same as everyone else that attends which also don't match the rest of your work.

You're basically dissing the "art" of photography, since you're saying that almost anyone holding a camera could take great fashion pictures if they had access to exceptional teams & models - as if the job of being a photographer has no value..coming from someone who is a photographer, it doesn't sound very smart.
I do agree that having these teams and models is a basic requirement.  I mean, there are certainly examples of photographers who mainly rely on their models and teams, but the history of fashion photography is filled with examples of great artists who use the opportunity of a fashion image to create timeless masterpieces from Erwin Blumenfeld to Helmut Newton. They elevate the genre far beyond just a documentation of a fashion moment.
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MarkL
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« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2013, 06:57:45 AM »
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You're basically dissing the "art" of photography, since you're saying that almost anyone holding a camera could take great fashion pictures if they had access to exceptional teams & models - as if the job of being a photographer has no value..coming from someone who is a photographer, it doesn't sound very smart.
I do agree that having these teams and models is a basic requirement.  I mean, there are certainly examples of photographers who mainly rely on their models and teams, but the history of fashion photography is filled with examples of great artists who use the opportunity of a fashion image to create timeless masterpieces from Erwin Blumenfeld to Helmut Newton. They elevate the genre far beyond just a documentation of a fashion moment.

I don’t feel that I am. In fashion, a photographer is primarily a director, the one with the concept and vision which is the total opposite of having no value. Since creative vision is unique to the person I’m not sure how this workshop helps because you will be shooting someone else’s vision not your own which was what my “doesn't match the rest of your work” comment was directed at. One componant is a great concept and idea, the other is the means to execute it by having a great team, location, clothes etc.
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Rob C
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« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2013, 03:47:00 AM »
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Much depends how far back you go.

As far as I can tell, the idea of a big team was originally an American thing, possibly an invention of need carried over from the Hollywood influences, whereas most of the European greats made their names by going out with the girl and doing their mutual thing. The 'team' concept flies in the face of the creative solo artist, where the fewer the disparate factors at work the greater the chances of getting done that which you wish to do.

In my day, models did their own hair and makeup, the photographer, at most, needed a kid with young muscle to carry the weights and be the one exhausted after the struggle to wherever the location might be. It's nice to have someone to hold steady a lighting stand or reflector out on a windy beach, be first line of defence against cows in a field...

I realise that was a simple way of working, and that today folks need to have computers, people to work the computers, clients, hair, makeup, wardrobe and any number of modern aides to assist the flow of the great man's mind.

Wasn't always the case, and looking at a lot of the contemporary work that graces the pages of mags, less would often have been more.

Perhaps that's why there's less personality around today; that any number of shooters could be thought to have made any particular shot: it is all teamwork, committee photography.

There would never have been a Sarah Moon, a David Bailey nor a Helmut Newton if those people had been forced to work as button pushers.

Rob C
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TMARK
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« Reply #16 on: May 29, 2013, 03:09:08 PM »
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Much depends how far back you go.

As far as I can tell, the idea of a big team was originally an American thing, possibly an invention of need carried over from the Hollywood influences, whereas most of the European greats made their names by going out with the girl and doing their mutual thing. The 'team' concept flies in the face of the creative solo artist, where the fewer the disparate factors at work the greater the chances of getting done that which you wish to do.

In my day, models did their own hair and makeup, the photographer, at most, needed a kid with young muscle to carry the weights and be the one exhausted after the struggle to wherever the location might be. It's nice to have someone to hold steady a lighting stand or reflector out on a windy beach, be first line of defence against cows in a field...

I realise that was a simple way of working, and that today folks need to have computers, people to work the computers, clients, hair, makeup, wardrobe and any number of modern aides to assist the flow of the great man's mind.

Wasn't always the case, and looking at a lot of the contemporary work that graces the pages of mags, less would often have been more.

Perhaps that's why there's less personality around today; that any number of shooters could be thought to have made any particular shot: it is all teamwork, committee photography.

There would never have been a Sarah Moon, a David Bailey nor a Helmut Newton if those people had been forced to work as button pushers.

Rob C

Moon, Newton, Penn were/are artists. 
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Rob C
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« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2013, 02:43:20 AM »
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Moon, Newton, Penn were/are artists. 


That's basically what it's about, T.

It's always been that with paint, so why would folks think it can be different with photographs? In fact, this simple concept explains pretty much all of the angst and frustration that gets voiced in forums devoted to photography. The hard fact of having or not having 'it' remains and can't be avoided. It would be nice if it could be bought, but unfortunately, no one can quite do that. The true democracy of art?

Rob C
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TMARK
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« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2013, 09:19:29 AM »
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That's basically what it's about, T.

It's always been that with paint, so why would folks think it can be different with photographs? In fact, this simple concept explains pretty much all of the angst and frustration that gets voiced in forums devoted to photography. The hard fact of having or not having 'it' remains and can't be avoided. It would be nice if it could be bought, but unfortunately, no one can quite do that. The true democracy of art?

Rob C

A heavy meritocracy.   

Compare Klinko to say Sara Moon.  Putting aside personality etc., Klinko's work is eye popping magazine fad.  I do not mean this as an insult.  Moon's fashion work, such as her ads for Citreon, read like a novel: complex, identity issues, a sense of despiration, decadence.  the difference is the complexity of the images and the message, more being better, and not the complexity of production.
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Rob C
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« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2013, 04:50:03 PM »
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A heavy meritocracy.   

Compare Klinko to say Sara Moon.  Putting aside personality etc., Klinko's work is eye popping magazine fad.  I do not mean this as an insult.  Moon's fashion work, such as her ads for Citreon, read like a novel: complex, identity issues, a sense of despiration, decadence.  the difference is the complexity of the images and the message, more being better, and not the complexity of production.



All I needed from Sarah was her Pirelli '72 and her Cacharel cosmetics work and I became hers for life.

Regarding Klinko: in the context of his published work (as far as I know it), he's as good as the rest of them working in that style, and their number is legion. It's the style that leaves me cold.

I guess it's part of being or not being a romantic soul. I believe in love, not in make-believe passion. Sally meeting Harry was a sociological disaster. Now everyone groans. Every time, and within five seconds.

Rob C
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