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Author Topic: Markus Klinko - Fashion/Celebrity Workshop in LA  (Read 7984 times)
TMARK
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« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2013, 11:18:30 PM »
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All I needed from Sarah was her Pirelli '72 and her Cacharel cosmetics work and I became hers for life.

Regarding Klinko: in the context of his published work (as far as I know it), he's as good as the rest of them working in that style, and their number is legion. It's the style that leaves me cold.

I guess it's part of being or not being a romantic soul. I believe in love, not in make-believe passion. Sally meeting Harry was a sociological disaster. Now everyone groans. Every time, and within five seconds.

Rob C

YES. 

That style you refer to is, to use an old word that is perfectly apt, VULGAR.  That's the problem, or my problem, with it.  All this bad taste gravitates toward that vulgar style with all of the heat of narcisistic yearning and impatient consumerism.  That's the vibe I get.

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JasonHernandezPhoto
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« Reply #21 on: June 10, 2013, 12:14:28 AM »
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I would hardly call this event epic. Klinko must be desperate for cash, lol. I heard his partner Indrani left him to pursue her solo film directing career, so don't expect to see her at this event. She was obviously the driving talent in this 'celebrity duo'. Just watch one episode of Double Exposure and see for yourself. And while you're on YouTube, look up 'studio lighting techniques'. All this information is out there already- it's not magic, or a trade secret. If it was, he wouldn't be telling his competition about it!


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HSakols
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« Reply #22 on: June 10, 2013, 09:39:43 AM »
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$5000.00 to help make the world more plastic.  $5000.00 to promote the idea to young girls, that they will never be good enough.
$5000.00 to promote the idea that an air brushed face is what all girls should strive for.  This is quite sad.
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TMARK
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« Reply #23 on: June 10, 2013, 09:56:19 AM »
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$5000.00 to help make the world more plastic.  $5000.00 to promote the idea to young girls, that they will never be good enough.
$5000.00 to promote the idea that an air brushed face is what all girls should strive for.  This is quite sad.

I'm not defending Klinko, but the plastic you refer to is a result of retouching, not the actual photography or anything that is the result of production.
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Rob C
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« Reply #24 on: June 10, 2013, 10:00:13 AM »
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I'm not defending Klinko, but the plastic you refer to is a result of retouching, not the actual photography or anything that is the result of production.


T, I'd be inclined not to overlook the added dimension of digital capture, which seems pretty good, all by itself, to create plastic where none existed. I even found it doing that to a red pepper.

Rob C
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TMARK
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« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2013, 01:22:07 PM »
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T, I'd be inclined not to overlook the added dimension of digital capture, which seems pretty good, all by itself, to create plastic where none existed. I even found it doing that to a red pepper.

Rob C

You are correct on that.  I think teh CCD cameras do better skin.  This is not science, just an observation.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2013, 11:50:36 AM »
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I'm not defending Klinko, but the plastic you refer to is a result of retouching, not the actual photography or anything that is the result of production.
All of that retouching is part of their "vision" or more accurately his  "style."  The process doesn't end when it is handed off to his retoucher - he is going for that look from the get-go and styling, hair, makeup, choice of model, and lighting and the entire image making chain from raw to finished is  what clients pay for.
As for his personality, well there's no doubt reality television twists and distorts who  people are when they are off camera:
- http://blogs.wsj.com/bankruptcy/2009/08/21/forget-speidi-meet-markus-and-indrani/
- http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/AllPointssuit.pdf
- http://finance.paidcontent.org/paidcontent/news/read?GUID=14612737
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Ellis Vener
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GWStudioLA
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« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2013, 12:39:03 PM »
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Woooow..really low to post those links. Who hasn't gone through some bad stuff during this economy these days?
It's commendable to be a real professional working photographer in this current economic turmoil...unlike some of you guys that have only nasty things to say about others.
HATERS GON HATE!
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TMARK
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« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2013, 01:57:10 PM »
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All of that retouching is part of their "vision" or more accurately his  "style."  The process doesn't end when it is handed off to his retoucher - he is going for that look from the get-go and styling, hair, makeup, choice of model, and lighting and the entire image making chain from raw to finished is  what clients pay for.
As for his personality, well there's no doubt reality television twists and distorts who  people are when they are off camera:
- http://blogs.wsj.com/bankruptcy/2009/08/21/forget-speidi-meet-markus-and-indrani/
- http://online.wsj.com/public/resources/documents/AllPointssuit.pdf
- http://finance.paidcontent.org/paidcontent/news/read?GUID=14612737


Ellis, I was commenting more generally on THAT style, not necessarily Klinko's style. (I should have been more clear). I've used the same lighting set ups (generally) and the same back/camera combo, worked with some of the same MUA's, but gave different instructions to the retouchers.  I'm sure he is going for THAT look, but it doesn't HAVE to be that way.
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TMARK
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« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2013, 02:02:52 PM »
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Woooow..really low to post those links. Who hasn't gone through some bad stuff during this economy these days?
It's commendable to be a real professional working photographer in this current economic turmoil...unlike some of you guys that have only nasty things to say about others.
HATERS GON HATE!

I'm not going to hate on Klinko or Indriani but they did stiff every third person in the biz in NYC when they went bust.  They weren't solely victims of the economic meltdown, which is why many people loath them deeply.  The main issue is that the times changed, and that style, of photography as well as personality, is now remembered as a bad dream, like Sunset BLVD is 1988.
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GWStudioLA
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« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2013, 03:37:33 PM »
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Look...all I'm just saying that times have changed with technology to the point where basically anyone out there can call themselves a "photographer."
I think it's interesting and fun to have a comradeship relationship with other photographers rather than a negative, judgmental one.
There are only few of us that still believe in the kindness of photography in which we all share tips and advice to others, which is what this forum is for.
I mean, yes - we could look up how to do some crappy basic lighting on youtube but that defeats the purpose of being personal with each other.
Everything is so virtual these days, for good and for bad, but I believe we have diminished the importance of meeting people in person and learning for each other.
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Rob C
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« Reply #31 on: June 11, 2013, 05:02:42 PM »
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Look...all I'm just saying that times have changed with technology to the point where basically anyone out there can call themselves a "photographer."
I think it's interesting and fun to have a comradeship relationship with other photographers rather than a negative, judgmental one.
There are only few of us that still believe in the kindness of photography in which we all share tips and advice to others, which is what this forum is for.
I mean, yes - we could look up how to do some crappy basic lighting on youtube but that defeats the purpose of being personal with each other.
Everything is so virtual these days, for good and for bad, but I believe we have diminished the importance of meeting people in person and learning for each other.



You must be very young. It won't last.

;-)

Rob C
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NancyP
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« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2013, 06:43:39 PM »
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Why complain that Klinko's work is "plasticky"? That's the nature of advertising photography, and yes, fashion photos are made simply in order to SELL STUFF. There isn't much fashion photography that attempts portraiture as well as fashion. But this isn't the most annoying style of fashion photography. I really get irritated at the knuckleheads that pose white American or European models among "the colorful natives", as if the locals are just interchangeable back-drop.
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TMARK
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« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2013, 10:27:46 PM »
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Why complain that Klinko's work is "plasticky"? That's the nature of advertising photography, and yes, fashion photos are made simply in order to SELL STUFF. There isn't much fashion photography that attempts portraiture as well as fashion. But this isn't the most annoying style of fashion photography. I really get irritated at the knuckleheads that pose white American or European models among "the colorful natives", as if the locals are just interchangeable back-drop.

Hey there!  I mean no disrespect at all but there is a bias on this here forum against commercial and fashion. It appears that many negative comments come about as a result of a shallow understanding of what is out there. This is fine, as most people's understanding of fashion is that it is a cross between the Khardashians and Zoolander, and if it doesn't interest a person there is no reason to expect a deep knowledge or even a broad survey level knowledge of the genre.

Editorial fashion doesn't sell anything except for magazines and commercial photography doesn't have to be plasticky. It often isn't. Look at Nadav Kander's commercial work for Morgan Stanley, Martin Schoeller, Mark Seliger, or for fashion look at Nick Knight, Paolo Roversi, Sebastian Kim, etc.

My humble opinion is that fashion and commercial photography doesn't have to be plasticky, just like landscapes don't have to be boring and repetitive.

Again, I mean no disrespect.
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Rob C
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« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2013, 03:31:43 AM »
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T is right. The worst thing about the 'plastic' look is that it removes the whole of the human element from the concept.

When one looks at these images one doesn't any longer see a model: one sees a construct, and sometimes one wonders if it is actually a model or - well, a model of a model.

The shock/surprise value died off years and years ago, and it seems to me that the only people not getting this are the editors. The snappers will provide whatever makes them able to continue in the world of dreams they inhabit. I don't mean a world that does not exist, I mean a real world of fantasy that does very much exist: I was part of it for many years. It's just another drug that you ingest through your eyes, your ego and often your genitalia.

I enjoyed it during the years it lasted; I'd hate any female in my family being a part of it.

Rob C
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TMARK
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« Reply #35 on: June 12, 2013, 08:26:31 AM »
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I enjoyed it during the years it lasted; I'd hate any female in my family being a part of it.

Rob C

Yes and no.  Some parts of the industry are just scummy, but career models, who have their heads together, do very well.  Most semi-retire around 30, transitioning to lifestyle and TV ads.  If they aren't train wrecks they have saved LOTS of money and went to school, then opened restaurants, bought houses, are married with children.  The danger is to the girls who have emotional issues when they enter the industry.  There can be many traps for the unwary.  So yeah, I would support my daughters if they wanted to model, depending on who they are at that stage of their lives.

T
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #36 on: June 12, 2013, 04:08:22 PM »
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Woooow..really low to post those links. Who hasn't gone through some bad stuff during this economy these days?
It's commendable to be a real professional working photographer in this current economic turmoil...unlike some of you guys that have only nasty things to say about others.
HATERS GON HATE!

Excuse me , but I am a working photographer and my business has done nothing but steadily grow over the past few years, and I haven't needed to do what he and his (former?) partner have done. Neither have any of the very hard working photographers that I personally know  who are also thriving have.

What exactly are you objecting to? If you don't like people knowing what he's done, than maybe he should not have done it or maybe you should not be working for him.
Of course if you just want to act like a bad PR flack, keep it up. In 2013 thinking that saying  "Haters gonna hate" is an acceptable answer anywhere outside of a junior high school loses you credibility faster than just about anything elae you could say.

On the other hand maybe as a budding PR flack you should try taking  some lessons from PR pros who have real world experience dealing with these types of problems. Hollywood is full of them... but so is New York, London, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Rome, and Paris.

I wish Mr. Klinko well in his career and you in yours.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2013, 04:10:31 PM by Ellis Vener » Logged

Ellis Vener
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #37 on: June 12, 2013, 04:13:22 PM »
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Yes and no.  Some parts of the industry are just scummy, but career models, who have their heads together, do very well.  Most semi-retire around 30, transitioning to lifestyle and TV ads.  If they aren't train wrecks they have saved LOTS of money and went to school, then opened restaurants, bought houses, are married with children.  The danger is to the girls who have emotional issues when they enter the industry.  There can be many traps for the unwary.  So yeah, I would support my daughters if they wanted to model, depending on who they are at that stage of their lives.

T
Great Points, all of them.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
MarkL
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« Reply #38 on: June 13, 2013, 07:04:27 AM »
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Yes and no.  Some parts of the industry are just scummy, but career models, who have their heads together, do very well.  Most semi-retire around 30, transitioning to lifestyle and TV ads.  If they aren't train wrecks they have saved LOTS of money and went to school, then opened restaurants, bought houses, are married with children.  The danger is to the girls who have emotional issues when they enter the industry.  There can be many traps for the unwary.  So yeah, I would support my daughters if they wanted to model, depending on who they are at that stage of their lives.

A lot of the money is also being made by models working in commercial and catalogue work. No one will have heard of them, they won’t get tear sheets from top fashion mags but they make a very good living and keep the model agencies lights on.
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TMARK
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« Reply #39 on: June 13, 2013, 10:00:51 AM »
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A lot of the money is also being made by models working in commercial and catalogue work. No one will have heard of them, they won’t get tear sheets from top fashion mags but they make a very good living and keep the model agencies lights on.

Absolutely.  The high fashion models who aren't "names" often transition into commercial/life style, catalogue, and TV commercials.  They are professionals and high earners, making upwards of $280k a year (gross) in NYC.  Not bad.  They work lots, and work hard.
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