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Author Topic: Optimum Time-frame for stretching  (Read 487 times)
Mike Guilbault
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« on: June 07, 2013, 09:29:39 PM »
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I realize it may vary somewhat from brand to brand (I'm currently using Lyve & Timeless), but is there an optimal time between printing, coating and stretching?  In other words, once the canvas is printed, should you coat within a certain time period; can you leave a canvas uncoated for a long period (lets say weeks); and once it's coated and dry, should you stretch within a certain amount of time or can they be stretched at any time?

I'm trying to determine the best workflow for printing, coating and stretching.  I order my stretcher frames from my frame supplier and I get shipments once a week in most cases, but in the case of backorders, it may be a couple weeks between coating and stretching and wondering if there's anything I should be aware of.
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Paul2660
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« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2013, 11:00:43 AM »
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With Timeless, I allow a matte canvas to outgas for about 24 hours.  If you take it straight from the printer to coating, you can get very faint bubbles, not the ones people get from too much timeless being sprayed, but tiny ones, more around the weave lines.  They will show up more on solids, especially blacks, dark blues etc.  This issue seems to go away after the 1st 24 hours or so. 

After coating, I will let the canvas sit about 1 hour then take it to stretch.  You don't have to wait as long as with Glamour II.  Timeless will be dry in most climates within 15 to 20 minutes.  However with Lyve and timeless, you can wait as long as you want.  Print and coat, then store them rolled up. 

Leaving a matte canvas uncoated is fine, however, it's so easy to scratch it, or get other impurities on the face that I tend to try and get them coated as soon as possible. 

Paul Caldwell


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Paul Caldwell
Little Rock, Arkansas U.S.
Photography > http://photosofarkansas.com
Blog> http://paulcaldwellphotography.com
Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #2 on: June 08, 2013, 06:24:14 PM »
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That's what I wanted to know Paul.. Thanks.  I had read somewhere - not here - that the longer you leave a canvas before stretching, the greater are the chances of cracking when stretched, especially at the corners.  May be for a specific canvas/coating combo - not sure.
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