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Author Topic: Camera calibration  (Read 1894 times)
stamper
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« on: June 09, 2013, 06:15:24 AM »
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I have a Asus pa246 monitor which is described as a wide gamut monitor. When I calibrate with Spyder Express 4 the calibrator reports the monitor as being a normal gamut. It asks if I want to proceed as if it is indeed a wide gamut monitor and I agree I wish do do so. The question is there much difference in the calibration between the wide and normal calibration? TIA.
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JRSmit
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« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2013, 08:54:12 AM »
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I have a Asus pa246 monitor which is described as a wide gamut monitor. When I calibrate with Spyder Express 4 the calibrator reports the monitor as being a normal gamut. It asks if I want to proceed as if it is indeed a wide gamut monitor and I agree I wish do do so. The question is there much difference in the calibration between the wide and normal calibration? TIA.
Stamper the title says Camera Calibraton, the content is about monitor calibration. Anyhow, check www.prad.de if this monitor is reviewed by them, they are actually quite good in monitor reviewing.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2013, 12:13:23 PM »
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I have a Asus pa246 monitor which is described as a wide gamut monitor. When I calibrate with Spyder Express 4 the calibrator reports the monitor as being a normal gamut. It asks if I want to proceed as if it is indeed a wide gamut monitor and I agree I wish do do so. The question is there much difference in the calibration between the wide and normal calibration? TIA.

Only Datacolor can tell you for sure, sounds like a bug. After you build the profile, do you have a way to inspect it's gamut? Does the display and print produce an acceptable match? 
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Andrew Rodney
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stamper
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« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2013, 03:05:50 AM »
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Thanks for the reply. You are correct about it being monitor and not camera. My excuse. I was in a hurry to get out and should have posted at a better time. It seems like that calibrating with a Spyder is wrong and the monitor comes with a profile which is supplied on a disc and it should be loaded in Display in Windows 7 and not the Spyder profile. Further reading is required to see if it is better than than Asus profile.
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D Fosse
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« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2013, 09:16:32 AM »
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I've no idea why it would ask about gamut - it's just another native monitor color space; they're all a bit different anyway. Why would the calibrator even care? It should just read the values and make the profile accordingly and not have any opinions beyond that...are you sure you read that correctly?

No, don't use the supplied profile. It's probably all over the map, most canned profiles are, and it certainly won't be anything close to accurate.

The "express" edition of the Spyder is a bit limited software-wise, but the sensor is top-notch (same sensor as the other editions, just cosmetically different). It has no problems with wide gamut monitors.

Just be aware that it does not support a multi-monitor setup. You can calibrate one display, and that's it. Additional displays should be left alone to use sRGB. If you attempt to calibrate another connected monitor, the same profile will be used for both. Which makes it pretty useless in a laptop + external monitor setup.
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stamper
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« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2013, 10:14:50 AM »
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I have done some more research and the "canned" profile is considered usable but is it better than the Spyder..... I am not sure. Regarding the two monitor set up you can profile two monitors. I am using Windows 7. Profile the first and find it in colour settings and rename it. Switch the number 2 monitor in display to be your main monitor and profile it. You now will have two profiles. Switch back number 2 to the second monitor. In colour management load the "correct" profile to the different displays.

http://photoshopcs.com/cheap_dual_monitor_calibration_spyder.html
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D Fosse
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« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2013, 02:17:57 PM »
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I haven't used Spyder Express in a long time, so I don't know if this really works. But I would double-check very carefully that both monitors do indeed have valid individual profiles. There is a possibility that it is in fact the same profile.

The problem is that profiles have both external and internal names. You can change the external name, but not the internal. You don't even see it anywhere.

It could be that Windows will load separate monitor LUTs into the video card, but that doesn't help with color managed applications. They load the full profile and convert to that on output to screen.

The monitor LUT (embedded in the profile) is not strictly part of the color management chain. It's just a very basic global correction to the display. The full profile is a complete description of the monitor's characteristics in much higher precision, and that's what color managed applications use.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 02:24:44 PM by D Fosse » Logged
stamper
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« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2013, 02:43:00 AM »
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When I calibrated my main ( number 1 monitor ) monitor I located the profile and renamed it Spyder4Express Asus. If you change the name then Asus must be added to the end and not a total renaming of the profile. In colour management it is loaded as default. Number 2 monitor has the created profile Spyder4Express loaded as default which was created after temporarily making it my main monitor. On my number 2 monitor there had been a slight yellowish cast prior to loading the profile which is now gone. Both monitors - despite being different brands - now look very similar. To my eyes the profiles are working differently and I am happy that they are influencing the monitors in the fashion stated in the link. Even if they aren't working as stated I am still happy because they are similar. The second monitor is a HP LP2065.
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