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Author Topic: Briot part 3: how many here have written an artist's statement?  (Read 3988 times)
NancyP
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« on: June 12, 2013, 04:51:44 PM »
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Alain Briot's most recent article (part 3) emphasizes the importance of a formal artist's statement. How many people here have actually written such a statement in the past? I expect that the people who sell photographs at juried craft fairs have such statements, just as part of the process of applying for the limited booth space. Event and studio photographers have an obvious rationale for their photographs (client fees). Most fine-arts professionals need to have an "about" page on their web site. Amateurs out there, have you written an artist's statement, and why?
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2013, 06:49:55 PM »
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I have written a few artist statements, basically for two reasons:

1.   When asked for such a statement by some place (juried exhibit, magazine) that specifically asks for one, or
2.   For solo shows on a theme, where a page of explanation seems appropriate.

On the whole, though, I'd rather drink Dektol!

Eric M.
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Peter McLennan
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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2013, 11:15:42 PM »
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On the whole, though, I'd rather drink Dektol!
Eric M.

Agreed, Eric.  I'd drink Photo-flo instead, if it meant that I didn't have to have an Artist's Statement.   A brief bio, sure.  But no "statements".
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Colorado David
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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2013, 12:38:15 AM »
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I started writing an artist's statement after reading Briot's book on marketing fine art photography.  I have struggled with it through a couple of iterations and have not finished.  Companies are still willing to write me checks for shooting pictures so I haven't worked very hard at print sales yet.
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NikoJorj
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2013, 04:41:45 AM »
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Is that so difficult? http://www.artybollocks.com/
(dives for cover)
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Nicolas from Grenoble
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W.T. Jones
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2013, 06:23:27 AM »
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Is that so difficult? http://www.artybollocks.com/
(dives for cover)

Niko,
Bravo, Very funny  Grin
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Warren
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2013, 07:35:19 AM »
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This is closest I have come.  I didn't write it. enjoy

Hugh Sakols first started exploring Yosemite on a backpacking trip when he was seventeen years old. He started seriously photographing the Park after working as a Yosemite Institute instructor teaching environmental education. Today he continues to explore the Park, whether it be summer or winter. He now lives in El Portal,CA where he is an elementary school teacher. Hugh’s photographs have been used by the National Park Service and Yosemite Conservancy. 

Hugh Sakols has had a long and intimate connection to Yosemite and the Sierra.  It began with a backpacking trip at age 17 and progressed through stints as a camp counselor and as an instructor with the Yosemite Institute.   By 2001, Hugh landed a coveted position as the 4/5/6 grade teacher at the El Portal Elementary School.  Fondly known as “Doctor Sakols” to the locals, Hugh is well known for sharing his enthusiasm for environmentalism and for science in general.  He is also much appreciated for contributions to the intellectural life of the community, for example as being one of the founding fathers of the viral hit “The Yosemite Marching Band.”  Hugh uses his expertise   in photography to document daily life in the school and community.  He also contributes his art to various local fundraisers and for programs supported by the National Park Service, the Yosemite Association, and the Yosemite Institute.  He is currently working on a project to document local color in the El Portal community.  Plus, his wife is hot and is really good at finding lost things.
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NancyP
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« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2013, 10:18:49 AM »
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As a physician, if you feel that you HAVE to drink something, I ask that you avoid Dektol, likely toxic. Photo Flo might taste nasty, but it is basically detergent and thus not toxic in small quantities. (No MSDS data available at Kodak site). Wink . My recommendation for the beverage of choice is Your Favorite Beer, Ale, Stout/Bitters.

Arty Bollocks - very funny.

Hugh, did your wife write that statement? I noticed the last line: "his wife is hot"...
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Colorado David
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« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2013, 11:36:56 AM »
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As a physician, . . .

I had a good friend, now gone, who was a retired physician and an excellent amateur photographer.  He would donate photography services to a number of institutions.  I told him that when I retired I was going to be an amateur physician.  He didn't think it was as funny as I did.

Oh, and my wife is hot too.
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VidJa
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« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2013, 04:46:38 PM »
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writing an artist statement is like having asked Picasso to explain his reasons to create art. Never mind what he would have written, but be assured the next great piece of art would be completely out of line with that statement. That is what a true artist is about, being creative without knowing the outcome in advance. No matter what the statement says.

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PeterAit
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« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2013, 05:01:41 PM »
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Good photography, at least the important aspects of it, is all right-brain stuff. Writing a statement is left-brain stuff. Two different universes.
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Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
GeraldB
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« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2013, 07:09:44 PM »
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Arty Bollocks - LoL  Cheesy

and Peter +1 to that sentiment about left/right brain
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Rob C
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« Reply #12 on: June 14, 2013, 03:08:17 AM »
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Good photography, at least the important aspects of it, is all right-brain stuff. Writing a statement is left-brain stuff. Two different universes.




Couldn't disagree more, Peter.

I'd have no problem at all writing such a statement had I any wish so to do, and it's my experience in general that people with a creative nature can do several different creative things rather well, writing being one such. Especially true, I think, the relationship between the visual arts, music and writing, in the sense that 'writing' is but an extension of speech.

To find an illustration for this, go no further than the king Stones: both Jagger and Richards can give the stage impression of being boorish, dumb, tongue-tied morons that got lucky. When you actually listen to them speak during interviews, explain their points of view, you realise that the musical jive talk front is just that: a front. They are both rather articulate and well-spoken when the occassion suits.

There are many places on the Internet where you can find famous photographers speaking about life and themselves; I don't fnd many of them articulating in grunts.

Rob C
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #13 on: June 14, 2013, 07:33:03 AM »
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Artist statements are little more than narcissistic, navel-gazing, overwrought, angst-ridden, claptrap that are an insult to intelligence.  That certain people consider it of vital importance is unsurprising.  Roll Eyes
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snoleoprd
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« Reply #14 on: June 14, 2013, 08:51:05 AM »
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To find an illustration for this, go no further than the king Stones: both Jagger and Richards can give the stage impression of being boorish, dumb, tongue-tied morons that got lucky. When you actually listen to them speak during interviews, explain their points of view, you realise that the musical jive talk front is just that: a front. They are both rather articulate and well-spoken when the occassion suits.

Rob C

Jagger also has a degree in business from a good school and has managed all of the Stones business deals etc. since day one. They are certainly successful.....

Alan

P.S. Love the artybollocks.....
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Alan Smallbone
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« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2013, 03:42:33 PM »
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I read through the Artist Statement on Alain Briot's site. I actually found it pretty interesting.

Terry.
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dreed
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« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2013, 09:57:56 PM »
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Part 3 was well written, it introduced a new aspect and explained how it related to the topic. A good read.
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NancyP
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« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2013, 10:06:48 PM »
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Right now, my artist's statement is:  Try New Stuff.  Cheesy
I am too green to have a "style", and I am enjoying the learning process. I will develop a style only by getting enough of a skill set to make conscious (or unconscious) choices, and apply those choices to a topic of interest.
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Isaac
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« Reply #18 on: June 14, 2013, 11:26:39 PM »
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fwiw

"... an Artist Statement is a self-evaluation of your work as it stands in the here and now. If anything, it is looking back at the process and the work and evaluating your progress, effort and results. More than anything it implies that you understand what you have done."

page 91 PHOTO-EDITING and PRESENTATION


"When you present your work it is most likely you will be asked to accompany it with some sort of contextualizing statement. ... Sometimes this statement is referred to as a Statement of Intention. That is extremely problematic terminology as it implies that it is necessary to make the case that what you have done is exactly what you intended to do. Seldom does this occur, and when and if it does it can be more a liability than a success. ... a Statement of Intention is forward looking while an Artist Statement is a self-evaluation of your work as it stands in the here and now."

page 51 STUDYING PHOTOGRAPHY: A Survival Guide
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Rob C
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« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2013, 02:04:57 AM »
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Right now, my artist's statement is:  Try New Stuff.  Cheesy
I am too green to have a "style", and I am enjoying the learning process. I will develop a style only by getting enough of a skill set to make conscious (or unconscious) choices, and apply those choices to a topic of interest.


I would suggest that developing a style that works is essentially nothing more than an unconscious manifestation of self. Otherwise, I think it becomes parody without the humour, and though that can (and does) work in a commercial sense, I don't see that it can do anything for the artist's development of him/herself.

You can never be anyone other than yourself, and it's hard enough to know who that is at any given time.

Rob C
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