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Author Topic: HDR B/W  (Read 4043 times)
HSakols
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« on: June 14, 2013, 10:05:32 AM »
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Has anyone played with HDR in black and white.  HDR in color always looks a little strange to me but using it for black and white sounds intriguing.  If so I like to see some examples and a brief description of your workflow. 
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2013, 06:24:59 PM »
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There's lots of b&w HDR out there, from mild to wild.  Google is your friend. 
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elf
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« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2013, 08:29:41 PM »
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Just search on "Ansel Adams"  Smiley
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Guillermo Luijk
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« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2013, 04:43:59 AM »
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Just search on "Ansel Adams"  Smiley

Congrats. Probably many won't understand what you meant, but I completely agree.

In fact those who may think you are joking are those who don't have a rudimentary knowledge of what HDR is about.
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2013, 04:52:13 AM »
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Congrats. Probably many won't understand what you meant, but I completely agree.

In fact those who may think you are joking are those who don't have a rudimentary knowledge of what HDR is about.

And that also applies to the difference between HDRI and tonemapping, for that matter.

Cheers,
Bart
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PhotoEcosse
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« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2013, 05:17:14 AM »
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HDR in colour always looks a little strange to me but using it for black and white sounds intriguing.

 

HDR should only look "strange" if it has been badly done (or deliberately overcooked to look weird). Ideally, the viewer should not be able to tell that HDR has been used to compensate for the DR deficiencies of the digital sensor.

But yes, it can be used in black and white although, in mono photographs, solid blacks and whites tend to be more acceptable than in colour images.

Here is one of mine that was blended in HDR Efex Pro2 from a -2, 0, +2 EV sequence.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/45711981@N00/7839988812/" ></a>

If I was doing that one again, I would probably turn the "structure" down a shade. It is just a bit too harsh for my liking.

.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2013, 05:24:33 AM by PhotoEcosse » Logged

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RFPhotography
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« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2013, 01:52:44 PM »
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Just search on "Ansel Adams"  Smiley

Yep.
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petermfiore
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« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2013, 02:13:48 PM »
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 The reason HDR can often look strange is the basic principle that the value structure has broken down. By that I mean improper values have crossed over into the incorrect areas. Such as values that should remain in the light group cross over into the shadow areas and visa-versa. In Painting this is the single biggest issue that will plague beginners, and their work often fails. Nature works because that's the way we visually see the world. Play with that too much and the illusion of form is destroyed.



Peter
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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2013, 02:47:13 PM »
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Why does HDR so often seem to end up reducing the dynamic range? Suddenly all shadow disappears ...
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2013, 04:22:43 PM »
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Why does HDR so often seem to end up reducing the dynamic range? Suddenly all shadow disappears ...

Hi,

HDRI doesn't, but subsequent tonemapping will reduce the scene's luminosity range down to the capabilities of the output medium. When that results in completely losing the shadows, then it was poor tonemapping (by the operator's choosing).

Cheers,
Bart
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Shmitty
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« Reply #10 on: June 22, 2013, 01:12:33 AM »
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Some people take HDR styling way too far in my opinion. Don't like that cartoon look... Less is more!
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #11 on: June 22, 2013, 08:03:04 AM »
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Hi,

HDRI doesn't, but subsequent tonemapping will reduce the scene's luminosity range down to the capabilities of the output medium. When that results in completely losing the shadows, then it was poor tonemapping (by the operator's choosing).

Cheers,
Bart

Or ignorance.
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #12 on: June 22, 2013, 08:29:21 AM »
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Or ignorance.

Which would make it an uninformed choice, rather than poor (which is subjective anyway) taste.

Cheers,
Bart
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louoates
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« Reply #13 on: June 22, 2013, 09:22:18 AM »
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I tip my hat to those who use HDR without detection. I'm so sick of its overdone use.
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Jason DiMichele
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« Reply #14 on: June 22, 2013, 09:35:18 AM »
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I tip my hat to those who use HDR without detection. I'm so sick of its overdone use.

+1

Cheers!
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Jason DiMichele
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2013, 11:29:06 AM »
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Some people take HDR styling way too far in my opinion. Don't like that cartoon look... Less is more!

I agree, although it may take some effort to make it look simple.

Here's an example of needing HDRI to capture the scene dynamic range in the first place, and an attempt to bring it down to print capabilities (which are relatively limited) with tonemapping.

Attached is one of the exposure bracketed shots that started to capture some of the overhead window light details, but pushed +2EV to show some shadow detail. It was rather dark inside. The second attachment is the result of a 7-exposure exposure blending in SNS-HDR, and tonemapped with still some shadow and highlight clipping. This particular shot does not lend itself to a B&W conversion, IMHO.

Cheers,
Bart
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louoates
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« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2013, 12:31:03 PM »
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I think what some folks miss with HDR is that you don't have to restore all the light. It's a lot like forcing noon time lighting into the shot. The most effective HDR lets some of the light back in, managed in such a way as to maintain the drama of the darker areas to the setting rather than just pumping up the overall lighting. I also see no reason why this example couldn't be an effective B/W image.
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #17 on: June 22, 2013, 01:01:39 PM »
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I also see no reason why this example couldn't be an effective B/W image.

It requires the subtle colors in the overhead windows, and on the walls with rust and paint, and the moss on wood (see attached cropped foreground detail), to make it a bit interesting. It misses a strong subject, with light and powerful shadows that sculpt it. It was very dark inside and the windows were only letting diffuse light in, so there is hardly any directional light present, as can be seen in the first shot.

For a successful B&W conversion, it also helps to have color differences that can be used in the conversion process to create color channel separation/contrast where light/shadow contrast is missing.

That's also why I'm a bit surprised by the OP, which sort of suggests that a poor color image can become a good B&W image. In my book, an image is made with a certain artistic intent in mind. Changing it to something different can only deviate from that original intent.

Cheers,
Bart
« Last Edit: June 22, 2013, 01:46:10 PM by BartvanderWolf » Logged
deanwork
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« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2013, 04:00:49 PM »
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Now that I've ordered the D 800 to supplement my view camera drum scan work, I'm going to take a serious look at tonal range stretching in HDR. Might as well since I never shoot people  and usually use a tripod.

Can anyone recommend a GOOD video tutorial on it ?  I detest all the garish hdr work out there as well, most of it is comical, but I can see it being used tastefully to increase shadow and highlight detail with some files under certain lighting conditions.

john


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wolfnowl
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« Reply #19 on: June 24, 2013, 01:39:11 AM »
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I do a lot of B&W HDR work.  Here are a few:


Still Standing by wolfnowl, on Flickr


Inner Harbour Clouds (B&W) by wolfnowl, on Flickr


Fence Post by wolfnowl, on Flickr


Caught by wolfnowl, on Flickr


Cloudscape by wolfnowl, on Flickr

Mike.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2013, 01:40:54 AM by wolfnowl » Logged

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