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Author Topic: Rock Art #12  (Read 776 times)
mattpallante
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« on: June 16, 2013, 06:44:45 AM »
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Love this image, Michael. Can you tell us more about it?

Matt
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michael
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2013, 08:00:41 AM »
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I will be putting together a small portfolio of Australian Rock Art photographs produced on this trip. We visited three sites, none regularly visited, and one, apparently only known to the crew of the True North and its helicopter pilot.

Here's the Wikipedia entry, in part...

"Rock paintings appear on caves in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, known as Bradshaws. They are named after the European, Joseph Bradshaw, who first reported them in 1891. To Aboriginal people of the region they are known as Gwion Gwion. Traditional Aboriginal art is composed of organic colours and materials, but modern artists often use synthetic paints when creating aboriginal styles.
Aboriginal rock art has been around for a long period of time, with the oldest examples, in Western Australia's Pilbara region, and the Olary district of South Australia, estimated to be up to around 40,000 years old.[2] Rock art gives us descriptive information about social activities, material culture, economy, environmental change, myth and religion. This is an Aboriginal way of showing recognition and wisdom-to be open to the environment
."

There was a couple from Australia with a passion for rock art, and they spend much of their time and money searching for sites. They claimed that this otherwise undocumented site was among the best that they'd even seen. It was a 20 minutes chopper flight over some extremely remote and inhospitable territory.

As with rock art almost anywhere in the world these are found under rocky overhangs, protected from weather. The ceilings are very low and shooting these usually meant lay on one's back on the ground and shooting upwards with a very wide angle lens.

Michael
« Last Edit: June 16, 2013, 08:03:05 AM by michael » Logged
Rob C
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2013, 12:15:46 PM »
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Matt, I'm about 3/5ths of the way through Life, the 'assisted' autobiography of one of my favourite guitar men, Keef.

I thought this thread was going to be more of the same. Oh well. Another kind of rock.

Regarding Life, it certainly isn't one of the better-written books to have come my way, but I find it pretty much unputdownable!

The plot's a bit spaced, but then so, I gather, were the times they were living through, so any plot's a bonus, I guess. Anyway, no guy with a Riva called Mandrax can disappoint.

;-)

Rob C
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John Camp
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2013, 04:35:12 PM »
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Art (painting) is my main preoccupation, and I have to say, that's an astonishing image. I've seen Australian aboriginal art before, but nothing quite like this. This artist is the Rembrandt of the his time and territory...is there an estimated date?
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OldRoy
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2013, 09:37:30 AM »
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.... I'm about 3/5ths of the way through Life, the 'assisted' autobiography of one of my favourite guitar men, Keef...
...it certainly isn't one of the better-written books to have come my way, but I find it pretty much unputdownable!
... ;-)
Rob C
I felt the same way at that stage. As a social history of life in Britain amongst bright working class post-war kids (eg me'n'Keef) it's absolutely spot-on. Blues music had a significance for us that it's hard, nowadays, to convey. Unfortunately the remaining 40% of the book is progressively far less interesting, getting increasingly solipsistic (often irritatingly so) as his wealth drags him as far from "normality" as addiction did: only very boringly so.

Even more OT: I was told about the "Redlands" gathering a couple of days prior to the famous bust as I grew up in the area and had a friend who was connected with a member of the Stones road crew. Consequently I'm not surprised that the Forces of Darkness were aware of it. I also attended some of the trial in Chichester and...

But back to the other Dream Time.

I can heartily recommend "The Cave Painters: Probing the Mysteries of the World's First Artists" by
Gregory Curti, with the proviso that it's the only book on this subject I've read and that it's about European cave art rather than Australasian. A truly mysterious subject. At one point in the book he says that the style of the paintings created at Lascaux (as best I recall) remained absolutely constant for over 20,000 years. Ultimately, whilst there have been numerous academic theories, no one really has a clue what these incredibly beautiful and accomplished paintings were actually about or the reason for their creation in a location that never saw daylight. In that respect, given that Aboriginal culture has persisted - just about - up to the present day and has been intensively studied, we probably know more about the ancestral Aboriginals' world view than we do that of our own ancestors.

Some more of these pix wouldn't hurt!

Roy
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