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Author Topic: Snowdonia Stream  (Read 469 times)
MoreOrLess
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« on: June 17, 2013, 02:17:40 PM »
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Went back to a long exposure I took a couple of months ago and did a B&W conversion...

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Chairman Bill
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2013, 02:26:05 PM »
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Nice one
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sdwilsonsct
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2013, 11:00:11 PM »
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Nice one

Very!
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Tonysx
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« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2013, 06:17:38 PM »
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I'm curious. Why convert to B&W? I see in colour. Most people see in colour. It's a nice image but you've got rocks, water, trees, sky.... Why do so many poswters have such a fascination with black and white? Huh Huh Huh
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‘Be you ever so high, the law is above you.’ Lord Denning.
Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2013, 07:31:17 PM »
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I'm curious. Why convert to B&W? I see in colour. Most people see in colour. It's a nice image but you've got rocks, water, trees, sky.... Why do so many poswters have such a fascination with black and white? Huh Huh Huh
I can only answer for me.

1.   Black and White is inherently more abstract than color, a greater departure from "reality," so it encourages more variety of interpretation on the part of the viewer.

2.   B&W emphasizes form over color, so if the forms in a scene are more important than the colors, a B&W conversion enhances that.

3.   Color sometimes distracts from the main point of an image. In another thread, for example, Russ Lewis (RSL) has posted both a color and a black-and-white version of the same scene, an old mining sluice. To my eyes, in the color version the foreground color dominates and makes it difficult for me to see the rest of the image. In the monochrome version, the whole scene comes together much better, IMHO.

4.   I made my own black-and-white chemical prints for almost fifty years before joining the "digital revolution." It was great fun for a while to print things in color on my Epson 2200, but I quickly tired of most of it and yearned for the richness and mystery of B&W. So now probably 90% of what I print is in B&W.

5.   The old masters who were active when I was getting into photography (Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, Minor White, ...) did virtually all their work in B&W.

6.   Up on wals in my house at the moment I have 17 of my own framed prints. Of those, 13 are B&W, 3 are Color, and one is mostly B&W with one section in color.

7.   A final point: I'm what is called "color-blind," or more accurately, I have deficient color vision (garden variety "Red-Green" type), so I don't see colors the same way most others do (but roughly 5% of all men see colors the way I do). But Black-and-White looks (I think) pretty much the same to me as it does to others.

Eric M.
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-Eric Myrvaagnes

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RSL
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« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2013, 08:28:25 PM »
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Tony, I endorse six of Eric's points about B&W. I can't endorse #7 because, though my dad suffered from the same kind of color deficiency, I don't.

Since your age is N/A I don't know whether or not you realize how recently it was that fine art photography shows wouldn't even accept color prints. There were several reasons for this, the main one being, as Eric mentioned in #5, that B&W is the traditional genre of great photography. There still are galleries that will hang only B&W.

Like Eric, I have walls full of prints in my home. We're about to re-do the whole living room area and my wife has decided we're going to hang B&W prints in there.

Not every photograph lends itself to B&W, but if you start thinking in B&W you'll find that your grasp of the graphics in your photographs improves.
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MoreOrLess
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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2013, 04:26:54 AM »
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Eric really covers a lot of the reasons for B&W, I felt the subject and the lighting was best suited to a B&W conversion that would allow me to emphasize the contrast in the water and the rocks.
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Rob C
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« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2013, 12:33:54 PM »
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1.  Tony, I endorse six of Eric's points about B&W. I can't endorse #7 because, though my dad suffered from the same kind of color deficiency, I don't.

2.  Not every photograph lends itself to B&W, but if you start thinking in B&W you'll find that your grasp of the graphics in your photographs improves.



Russ,

1. That's because if the mother's father has it, Mama won't have it but will pass it to her son, but not to her daughter. And so on, like a medieval curse.

2. Bang on target. Also why digital isn't really the best way to learn photographic vision. Maybe a reason why older shooters did it better? They never relied on the concept of converting from colour originals - they just shot b/white and thought accordingly... unless they shot wilderness, in which case they just had to keep on truckin' with, at best, filters, because they couldn't rearrange anything much.

Rearrange... reminds me of this, from Shel Silverstein:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KV-PTK0UZ4

Rob C
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MoreOrLess
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« Reply #8 on: June 21, 2013, 12:57:14 PM »
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Personally I tend to shoot in RAW set to B&W, gives you a bit of a preview of what you might work towards in post but the option of converting from colour if need be.
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kikashi
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« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2013, 02:24:46 PM »
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1. That's because if the mother's father has it, Mama won't have it but will pass it to her son, but not to her daughter. And so on, like a medieval curse.

Close, but not quite complete. If the father of mother's daughter has it, so might she (and mother might have it if her mother is a carrier).

Jeremy
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Rob C
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« Reply #10 on: June 21, 2013, 02:35:09 PM »
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Close, but not quite complete. If the father of mother's daughter has it, so might she (and mother might have it if her mother is a carrier).

Jeremy




I despair!

The permutations are too deep for me to grasp at this time of night: it ends up looking incestuous. I'll look again in the morning...

Rob C
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