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Author Topic: D800 compared to D800 E with architecture  (Read 1597 times)
deanwork
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« on: June 22, 2013, 09:10:18 PM »
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I've been looking for posts on this subject and haven't found any.

Is anyone using or having considered the D 800E for architecture and have anything to say about it's suitbaility?

I'm going to buy either the D 800 or the E model this week and I do worry about moire.

Most of what I'm going to do is architecture on a tripod and various still life work.

john

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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2013, 11:59:19 PM »
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Hello,

I have both the D800 and E models which I use for architecture photography.

Yes there is a chance of getting moiré with the E model but it is very rare. Personally the difference in resolution is very minimal so if you don’t want moiré I would go with the D800.

I also have the 24mm,45mm and 85mm PC-E lenses which I think a superb I just wish Nikon would make a 17mm version.

Now some photographers think the 24mm PC-E lens is a dog but I have not had any problems with resolution in the corners.

The 16-35mm lens is also very good as well as the 14-24mm lens which does suffer from flare caused by the large front element.

Image one was taken with a D800E and Nikon 24-85mm  F3.5-4.5 VRII G lens

Image two was taken with a Nikon D800E and Nikon 16-35mm F4.0 VRII G lens

For still life work I use a Horseman VCC system with Rodenstock Rodagon lenses. The devise is indispensable for my type of work.

http://www.kenko-pi.co.jp/horseman/e/VCCpro/index.html

Cheers

Simon

« Last Edit: June 23, 2013, 05:10:20 PM by HarperPhotos » Logged

Simon Harper
Harper Photographics Ltd
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Auckland, New Zealand
kers
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2013, 02:10:15 AM »
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I use the d800e for architecture and must say moiré problems happen only very seldom.
Moiré occurred more frequently with the 24MP d3x I had before.
if it happens you can try a different raw converter; sometimes that helps.
The detail at pixel level I get from the d800e is very good and better than that from the d3x with the anti aliasing filter.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2013, 02:11:57 AM by kers » Logged

Pieter Kers
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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2013, 08:37:10 AM »
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I have both the D800 and D800E. Basically, because I "needed" a new camera in March last year and the D800E was not immediately available, I purchased the D800.

Then, when I wanted a second body so that I could have two lenses immediately available, I opted for the D800E.

Within the limits of my own practice - generally A3+ prints from not less than 10% of the image area - I can detect no discernible difference whatsoever in the images from the two cameras. My conclusion, therefore, has to be that it is not worth paying the extra £300 for the "E"-version. On the plus-side, I have never encountered any of the moiré that was predicted as a potential problem - even in highly textured subjects.
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2013, 10:25:35 AM »
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Within the limits of my own practice - generally A3+ prints from not less than 10% of the image area - I can detect no discernible difference whatsoever in the images from the two cameras.

Part of that is because there is only a very small (approx. 1%) difference in limiting resolution.

Quote
My conclusion, therefore, has to be that it is not worth paying the extra £300 for the "E"-version. On the plus-side, I have never encountered any of the moiré that was predicted as a potential problem - even in highly textured subjects.

That may also have to do with the apertures used. Starting at f/5.6, the visible influence of diffraction will start to reduce potential aliasing for low contrast features, and by f/18 there is virtually no aliasing possible anymore, even for high contrast features. That is with high quality lenses, aliasing will be reduced at wider apertures for lesser lenses, because of the combined effect of diffraction and residual lens aberrations on the system MTF.

Cheers,
Bart
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deanwork
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2013, 03:00:39 PM »
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Thank you everyone for confirming what I have read around the web.

Simon, I was not aware of the Horseman Rodenstock device. That looks amazing and makes me seriously considering all my 4x5 cameras and lenses to buy one.

John

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kers
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2013, 03:49:37 PM »
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Thank you everyone for confirming what I have read around the web.
Simon, I was not aware of the Horseman Rodenstock device. That looks amazing and makes me seriously considering all my 4x5 cameras and lenses to buy one.
John

Cambo has one too. I think it will turn out that the 4x5 inch lenses are not that sharp as their 35mm partners - but then you can stitch the whole 4x5inch and you will be amazed.
So only for some objects - but then you also could stitch with a good 35mm lens and i think the result would be even better.

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Pieter Kers
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2013, 05:14:34 PM »
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Hi David,

I have sold my Sinar P2, Mamiya 645AFDII, Mamiya RZ camera kits cause the Nikon D800 had made them obsolete.

The optics of the Rodenstock Apo Rodagon and Rodenstock Rodagon lenses are superb.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
Harper Photographics Ltd
http://www.harperphoto.com
http://www.facebook.com/harper.photographics

Auckland, New Zealand
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