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Author Topic: Shake reduction Filter and sharpening in CC  (Read 1212 times)
Onslow
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« on: June 24, 2013, 03:17:24 AM »
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I have the Adobe single App subscription and quite like a lot of the improvements in particular the Shake Reduction filter.

I use Photokit Sharpener for my capture, creative and output sharpening. What I am wondering is how the Shake reduction filter works in this workflow. I find it quite effective on my long focal length shots. I use capture sharpening in ACR as suggested in the Lula videos and 'The Digital Negative' by Jeff. I hand it over to PS CC and run the Shake Reduction filter. Does this replace the creative sharpening stage or is it performed best before the creative sharpening?

I'm trying to work out the best way to sort my workflow out with it..
Thanks for any thoughts...
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Cheers

Onslow
BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #1 on: June 24, 2013, 04:19:31 AM »
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I have the Adobe single App subscription and quite like a lot of the improvements in particular the Shake Reduction filter.

I use Photokit Sharpener for my capture, creative and output sharpening. What I am wondering is how the Shake reduction filter works in this workflow. I find it quite effective on my long focal length shots.

Hi Onslow,

Since the Shake Reduction filter uses deconvolution to increase resolution, it is best to use it first, before other sharpening or edge contrast enhancements.

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I use capture sharpening in ACR as suggested in the Lula videos and 'The Digital Negative' by Jeff. I hand it over to PS CC and run the Shake Reduction filter. Does this replace the creative sharpening stage or is it performed best before the creative sharpening?

It's probably best seen as a replacement Capture Sharpening filter, so to be used before Creative sharpening instead of regular Capture sharpening. You can test how effective it is as a Capture sharpening tool by itself, by trying it on an unshaken image that is dominated by diffraction blur, such as in this thread, and in particular this image crop (5.020kb !).

Cheers,
Bart
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Onslow
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« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2013, 09:16:08 AM »
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Hi Onslow,

Since the Shake Reduction filter uses deconvolution to increase resolution, it is best to use it first, before other sharpening or edge contrast enhancements.

It's probably best seen as a replacement Capture Sharpening filter, so to be used before Creative sharpening instead of regular Capture sharpening. You can test how effective it is as a Capture sharpening tool by itself, by trying it on an unshaken image that is dominated by diffraction blur, such as in this thread, and in particular this image crop (5.020kb !).

Cheers,
Bart

Hi Bart,
Thanks for replying..
Hmm, in place of the capture sharpening in ACR. So, out of interest then, would I need to set the sharpening in ACR to zero instead of the default values? This would then avoid a double capture sharpening if you understand what I mean...
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Onslow
kirkt
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« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2013, 11:09:42 AM »
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Yes - do your image-specific sharpening outside of ACR if the sharpening technique you need is outside of the capability of ACR's sharpening.  Here, if you need to apply the shake-reduction sharpen to reconstruct the image because of camera shake, do that first before you start trying to reclaim image sharpness with straight deconvolution, USM, etc. 

kirk
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2013, 11:19:38 AM »
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Hi Bart,
Thanks for replying..
Hmm, in place of the capture sharpening in ACR. So, out of interest then, would I need to set the sharpening in ACR to zero instead of the default values? This would then avoid a double capture sharpening if you understand what I mean...

Yes, if it does what it should do. AFAIK the ACR Capture sharpening is also applied post-demosaicing, so it doesn't matter if you do it in ACR or outside, but a complication is that ACR Sharpening is also tied in with the ACR noise reduction. I prefer to do my sharpening (and Noise reduction) outside of ACR because there are better tools for those functions than the ones in ACR. Maybe Shake Reduction proves to be a better tool than ACR capture sharpening as well.

Cheers,
Bart
« Last Edit: June 24, 2013, 11:21:23 AM by BartvanderWolf » Logged
digitaldog
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« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2013, 11:25:51 AM »
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I hand it over to PS CC and run the Shake Reduction filter. Does this replace the creative sharpening stage or is it performed best before the creative sharpening?

No (probably not). That part or PKS is, well creative. Since shake reduction is more a correction, I'd be inclined to suggest you run that after capture sharpening but before creative sharpening. Best to be creative on data you've 'fixed' first.
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2013, 12:14:12 PM »
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Since shake reduction is more a correction, I'd be inclined to suggest you run that after capture sharpening [...]

Hi Andrew,

In general, shake reduction algorithms do best when the data they get to process is as un-modified as possible. That means that distortion correction, sharpening, contrast adjustments, and noise reduction, are best postponed till after the shake reduction. In fact, these algorithms usually even perform better on linear gamma, only demosaiced, data.

Seen in that light, it's slightly odd that the Shake Reduction function is offered as a post-processing filter only, and not as part of ACR (where it could be used as Capture sharpening, also of unshaken files, as well), followed by al the other 'Raw' corrections.

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[...] but before creative sharpening. Best to be creative on data you've 'fixed' first.

Yes, it makes more sense to get creative when you know what to base that on.

Cheers,
Bart
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