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Author Topic: 5" Monitor for Nikon D800  (Read 9163 times)
BobDavid
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« on: July 03, 2013, 02:23:02 PM »
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I photograph a lot of stuff close to the ground. I am wondering if there is a light-weight 5" LCD monitor that I may attach to the D800 either on the hot shoe or onto a strobe bracket. I am too creaky to lie prone and stare through the viewfinder of a camera for durations of up to twenty minutes.
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Hening Bettermann
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« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2013, 02:28:12 PM »
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Samsung Galaxy S4?
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2013, 03:28:35 PM »
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Samsung Galaxy S4?


Yep.  Or Note 2.  Or many of the other higher end Android phones available.  There are plenty of apps that let you control the camera from the device and not have to lie on the ground in contorted positions.

For Nikon, I'd recommend either Helicon Remote or DSLR Dashboard.

Sadly, it's not easy to use an iPhone for this purpose because Apple, in its infinite wisdom, limits the power that can be drawn by USB-connected devices so it won't work in USB host mode.  I've heard that the Lightning port on the iPhone 5 will work in USB host mode but have seen no evidence of anyone trying it.  For Apple, Camranger is the way to go. 

Triggertrap and its mobile app is another option but with Triggertrap you don't get the Live View on the device screen so can't use the phone for composing the image, which is what you're looking for.
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BobDavid
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2013, 09:14:06 AM »
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I do not want to use a phone. I want continuous live view and to be able to trip the shutter on the camera, not the phone.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2013, 12:32:32 PM »
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The apps do give you continuous live view.  Why is it important to fire the camera from the camera rather than the phone/remote?
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BobDavid
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« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2013, 08:26:33 PM »
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I photograph animals. They are twitchy. I have been thinking about a 5" LED monitor. I like the haptic quality of directly triggering the shutter button on the camera. I really don't want to use a phone--small image and my fingers are not nimble.
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2013, 07:31:05 AM »
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A phone with a 4.7" screen isn't a lot different from the 5" screen you're wanting.  Your fingers don't have to be that nimble to use a phone. 

If you don't want to use a phone, then one of the available HDMI monitors that are used for video may be possible.  Not sure there are smaller than 7" versions though.
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tom b
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« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2013, 04:53:14 AM »
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Google search brought this up, and this.

The search was for: '5" HDMI monitors' if you want to look for yourself.

Cheers,
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kers
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« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2013, 10:33:43 AM »
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Google search brought this up, and this.
Cheers,
Seems like these monitors have less resolution than the monitor on the back of your DSLR... Maybe the good little monitors are indeed the phones and tablets...
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Pieter Kers
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BobDavid
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« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2013, 04:35:14 PM »
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I've decided on a 7" Marshall. I played around with a 5" monitor and the image was too small by the time it was set for a 2/3 aspect ratio.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #10 on: July 09, 2013, 11:00:38 AM »
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I do not want to use a phone. I want continuous live view and to be able to trip the shutter on the camera, not the phone.

The CamRanger gives you continuous live view and and nearly full camera controls (including ability to focus anywhere in the frame, magnified view,  focus anywhere in the frame , shutter speed, aperture, ISO, bracketing, white balance, focus stacking, HDR, focus stacking+HDR, intervalometer, long exposure,  live histogram, etc.)  but yes it requires either an iPhone, iPad, or an OS X 10.6 or more recent Mac, and now Android.  Yo ucan trip the shutter on the camera if you want to or on the computer/smart phone/tablet with virtually no lag. http://www.camranger.com/

I have been using one for seven or eight months and it works great . The full resolution files stay on the media in the camera unless you choose to import them to the tablet/smartphone/computer.
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Ellis Vener
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John Nollendorfs
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« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2013, 01:46:34 PM »
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Ellis
CamRanger is pretty cool and full featured, but $300 is a bit steep. If I had a compelling reason, I guess I would jump on it even at that price.
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kers
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« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2013, 01:57:32 PM »
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Ellis,
this camranger looks indeed very cool.

Could you tell me ;
how far can you use it from the camera?
Did you use it on an iPhone? - that would be the easiest thing for me...
If you happen to use  it with a d800 ; any problems?
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Pieter Kers
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2013, 02:50:17 PM »
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Pieter:

how far can you use it from the camera?

I have used it at up to roughly 200~250 feet away, indoors in a radio and electronics intense environment- more details below.

Did you use it on an iPhone? - that would be the easiest thing for me...

Previously used it with an iPhone 4, since last week I am now using it with  a fourth generation iPad as well.

If you happen to use it with a D800; any problems?

I've only used it regularly with Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III and 1D X cameras. The distance test may also have been done with a D800, I'm not sure as this was back in January.  The distance test was done indoors at a pro shop /print studio / rental studio facility and I wanted to see how it worked in that environment. The cameras were set up up at the front of the store and I went all the way back to the rear of their largest studio at the back of their building. It was a WiFi rich environment in a metal framed building with at least four walls, a printing/ retouching studio, multiple offices, a lot of flash rental gear, and at least two bathrooms between the iPhone running the CamRanger app and the CamRanger equipped cameras.
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Ellis Vener
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kers
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« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2013, 03:09:20 PM »
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Thanks for the info! I maybe could use it for my 40ft tripod...
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Pieter Kers
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« Reply #15 on: July 09, 2013, 04:54:13 PM »
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Ellis,
this camranger looks indeed very cool.

Could you tell me ;
how far can you use it from the camera?
Did you use it on an iPhone? - that would be the easiest thing for me...
If you happen to use  it with a d800 ; any problems?

I'm testing out the Android version and have used it with a D800.  No problems.  Haven't tried it with my D700 yet.

As an aside, the reason Apple users need something like the Camranger wireless device is because Apple doesn't include USB Host capability in the iPhone and severely limits it in the iPad.  I've heard rumours that the iPhone 5 has USB Host functionality through the new Lightning port but have seen no evidence of it working.  With Android, on the other hand, many devices do have USB Host functionality so can achieve much the same with a wired connection and an app.  The apps range from free to about $10.  The wireless + distance capability of the Camranger is nice though.
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BobDavid
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« Reply #16 on: July 09, 2013, 09:56:30 PM »
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I purchased an Ikan VK7i-SU 7" HDMI Field Monitor With the Nikon EN-N Battery Plate. It has HDMI in and HDMI out, 1280 X 800 resolution, and it runs off either an AC adapter or a Nikon EN-EL 15 battery. $450. My decision required a lot of research. I hope it works out.
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BobDavid
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« Reply #17 on: July 09, 2013, 10:02:09 PM »
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The CamRanger gives you continuous live view and and nearly full camera controls (including ability to focus anywhere in the frame, magnified view,  focus anywhere in the frame , shutter speed, aperture, ISO, bracketing, white balance, focus stacking, HDR, focus stacking+HDR, intervalometer, long exposure,  live histogram, etc.)  but yes it requires either an iPhone, iPad, or an OS X 10.6 or more recent Mac, and now Android.  Yo ucan trip the shutter on the camera if you want to or on the computer/smart phone/tablet with virtually no lag. http://www.camranger.com/

I have been using one for seven or eight months and it works great . The full resolution files stay on the media in the camera unless you choose to import them to the tablet/smartphone/computer.

CamrRanger sounds great for situations where the camera is on a tripod or not easy to handhold. I don't think it would work for photographing most dogs. http://www.topdogimaging.net/dog-photos.html
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RFPhotography
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« Reply #18 on: July 10, 2013, 06:07:55 AM »
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Why do you need a large monitor to handhold the camera to photograph dogs?
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BobDavid
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« Reply #19 on: July 10, 2013, 08:20:43 AM »
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Why do you need a large monitor to handhold the camera to photograph dogs?

I am 54-years old with an autoimmune disease similar to rheumatoid arthritis. I have had to give up my MO, which involved lying prone for periods of up to 30 minutes peering through the viewfinder while observing pet dogs that are more likely to be twitchy than not. My style is to observe carefully and to shoot as few frames as possible--usually less than 12 frames per round. Some dogs require three rounds before they get into the mindset of having their pictures taken. I take a calculated approach to photographing pet dogs. It has taken years to hone my craft. I am no longer able to lie prone for more than five minutes without experiencing pain and fatigue that lingers on for a day or two. A seven inch monitor attached to custom bracket will enable me to continue working. Instead of lying prone, I will be able to sit on a low stool. This workaround will enable me to continue honing my craft, serve clients, and get through a session without aggravating my muscles and joints.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2013, 09:49:01 AM by BobDavid » Logged
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