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Author Topic: TriggerTrap, Satechi, iOShutter or something else?  (Read 1059 times)
Mike Guilbault
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« on: July 04, 2013, 10:34:40 PM »
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What are you using to control long exposures?  I'm looking for something to use with my D800e and possibly an iPhone (4s) app.  I've read various reviews about the three mentioned, and they all seem so-so.  Has anyone used these products or is there something else I should consider?
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jrsforums
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« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2013, 07:33:29 AM »
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In my opinion, the best camera control currently available is CamRanger.
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John
Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2013, 07:56:12 AM »
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I've looked at CamRanger, but I don't want to spend $300.  I'm just looking for something to control bulb exposures (using the Lee Big Stopper) rather than sitting there with a stop-watch waiting to release.
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fike
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« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2013, 10:14:47 AM »
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I got trigger trap.  It works well, but I don't like to use it.

The problem is that you need to leave your phone on the camera for, potentially, hours.  I generally want to use my phone in that time, and it is completely dedicated as a time-lapse controller or intervalometer.  It drains your battery because the phone's screen has to stay on.

The last time I used it I remember setting up a nighttime star trails in winter.  There was some crunchy, icy snow on the ground, and my selected location was on an old dilapidated bridge over a small creek.  It was a railroad-style bridge, so the gaps between the ties were quite wide.  Between the darkness, the icy and slippery snow, and the rotting bridge, I was a bit nervous out there.  I slowly walked out onto the bridge and squatted down to setup the tripod.  Then I had to get my phone out of my pocket and attach the dongle to the phone and camera.  Squatting in the snow on the bridge over the pitch-black water, I configured the intervals.  Then I went to put the phone down.  The coiled bungee-cord-like wire wasn't long enough to set the phone down on the railroad tie.  I could let it hang, but then if it came detached from the headphone connector the phone would probably fall into the creek.  I was able to lean it against one of the tripod legs.  Then I carefully retraced my steps back off the bridge. I think I let it run for an hour and a half.  The whole time I was paranoid that the phone fell off and into the creek.  When I finally could take it no longer, I carefully walked back onto the bridge.  I was worried that the vibration of my steps would knock it in to the river.  It was still there.  The image worked okay (I haven't shown it because it just wasn't that amazing).

When these dedicated, third-party intervalometers are so cheap, I have trouble wanting to use my phone.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Delectronics&field-keywords=fotodiox%20intervalometer

Are you using it as an intervalometer or for motion detection, lighting trigger, etc... I haven't messed with the other triggers much, but I found it to be a bit finicky with motion detection and sound triggering.  I hate things that are finicky when I am trying to make pictures. 

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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
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I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
NancyP
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« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2013, 11:43:27 AM »
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I want to use my phone for other things, so I use one of these programmable intervalometers: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/749826-REG/Vello_RC_C1_ShutterBoss_Timed_Remote_for.html  . The photodiox seems to be the same, I just didn't shop hard enough. Simple, takes 2 AAA, also can be used as single shot remote release without bothering with programming or even batteries. While the camera is taking its 30 or 40 subs or the night's dark frame set, my phone is usually being used for SkySafari astronomy information app, my eyes are being assisted by binoculars, and my attention is somewhere outside of the camera field of view, trying to identify various sky objects.

Another option for Canon shooters with some models of non-pro DSLRs is Magic Lantern firmware, which among other things has an intervalometer. I have a 60D, but just haven't gotten into the very stable ML release for 60D yet - I have lots of software to learn, but tackle only one new one at a time. (Nebulosity 3, for now).
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fike
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2013, 12:25:49 PM »
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I have used Magic Lantern for 7D and it works, but the setup is a bit finicky.
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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
marcshaffer.net
TrailPixie.net

I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2013, 09:54:38 PM »
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Now that I"ve read some more, I don't think I want to use my phone.  I've been looking a the RFN-4s wireless remote for Nikon. (10-pin connector).  Anyone have any experience with this?  I don't think it has any kind of timer in it though - just a shutter button.
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