Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: critique of new poster's shot , please  (Read 518 times)
Michael Haspert
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 38


« on: July 05, 2013, 06:08:28 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Guys:
I've been lurking and learning for a while on this forum. Since your collective expertise is far above mine and your kindness and friendliness seem exemplary, I've gotten bold enough to ask for a critique.
Attached are two shots, a jpeg made from the raw file with no alterations, and my attempt at a conversion to B&W using photoshop CS6.

I thought I had 2 puzzles to solve:
1. Can I make something pleasing even though the woman is out of focus? (She slid in next to her husband and raised the mask just as I was about to shoot, so this is really a grab-shot.)
2. What is the best looking color-to-luminosity mapping? (Sorry, I don't know the usual name for that.)

I'm interested in any comments. Feel free to alter the shot to illustrate your point.

Thanks and Best Regards,
Mike

P.S.Large files are at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lurkingman/9166273799/in/set-72157634394862648
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lurkingman/9137423921/in/set-72157634394862648
Logged
Tony Jay
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2157


« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2013, 06:44:04 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi mike, welcome to LuLa.
You should enjoy yourself immensely here.

With regard to your questions:
1. There is nothing one can do about the fact that the subjects wife is out of focus.
    The real question is this: what is your creative aesthetic intent?
    If the male in focus is the real subject of your photo then that fact that his wife is out of focus will enhance your intent.
    In this instance the image may well be a winner.
    If that is not one's intent then maybe not so good.
2. I am assuming that this question is about B&W conversion.
   Simply put, there is no BEST.
   Every image needs its own approach.
   What looks good to you will depend on the subject matter, your aesthetic intent, and even your mood at the time.
   I use Lightroom to do my B&W conversions.
   Click on B&W in the HSL / Hue / B&W subpanel in the Develop module.
   From there just pull the colour sliders around and check out the results - don't be shy - pull them to their absolute extremes.
   One you know what sort of effects this gives work on the aesthetic effects that you desire.
   I tend to optimally develop an image as a colour image first before making a virtual copy to do a B&W conversion.

Feel free to raise any questions out of matters arising.

Tony Jay
Logged
seamus finn
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 868


« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2013, 08:18:57 AM »
ReplyReply

Nothing much wrong with that shot - the accidental inclusion of the out of focus lady, and especially the mask ... well, you couldn't have posed it better if you spent a week of Sundays setting it up. Be grateful for such serendipity and hope it accompanies you all your photographic life, especially if you like shooting in the street.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2013, 04:13:18 PM by seamus finn » Logged

brandtb
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 377


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2013, 08:37:02 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
Nothing much wrong with that shot - the accidental inclusion of the out of focus lady, and especially the mask ... well, you couldn't have posed it better if you spent aweek of Sundays setting it up. Be grateful for such serendipity and hope it accompanies you all your photographic life, especially if you like shooting in the street.
My thoughts exactly...love that she's out of focus...
Logged

Brandt Bolding
www.brandtbolding.com
Michael Haspert
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 38


« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2013, 12:51:29 PM »
ReplyReply

Nice to meet you, Tony and thanks for the kind advice. Re my question #2, your two pieces of advice--get the color file right first and to check the slider extremes-- are quite helpful and fit together well--I see , after some experiment, that the extremes of the color sliders can be very different with a differently-colored starting point. Thanks.

Re my first question, I failed to give enough information. I see I need practice even at something as 'straightforward' as forum questions. My idea of trying a B&W conversion was a response to seeing the wife out-of-focus. I wanted a portrait of both of them and the out-of-focus wife is, to me, an irremediable flaw in the color shot. Now, I usually read B&W shots as more ambiguous, or more evocative, or both; when compared with a color shot of the same scene. So, my  B&W conversion was a try at salvaging the shot by making the wife an interesting second subject even though she was out of focus. Does this make any sense?
Logged
Michael Haspert
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 38


« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2013, 12:54:52 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi Brandtb:
I got an email from you with specifics of altering the shot but it had a broken link, so I never saw the remake you were describing. Could you resend or post your remake, please?
Best Regards,
Mike
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad