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Author Topic: Image wrap on an object  (Read 1909 times)
abeofRD
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« on: July 08, 2013, 02:52:58 PM »
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Hi,

I don't know if this is the best place to ask this question but since its a Photoshop/image editing forum and I am a member of this forum I 'll ask the question, I apologize beforehand.

We are photographing a Comforter Bed Set for a client since there will be different designs so we want to shoot only one in solid white, and then warp each design on top of the white because shooting for each design will be very costly.

Any tips and tricks would be welcomed, or any place where to go to ask this question.

Thank you all in advance.

Attached is a sample


Abe
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Malcolm Payne
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2013, 05:00:55 AM »
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I seem to remember seeing a rather impressive demo of something similar at the Focus on Imaging show once, using Photoshop's Displace filter if I recall correctly. I don't know whether that will do exactly what you need, and unfortunately it was a few years ago and I can't now recall the full details, but if you Google 'Photoshop displacement map' that should at least give you some ideas to experiment with.

Malcolm
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2013, 06:22:48 AM »
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Any tips and tricks would be welcomed, or any place where to go to ask this question.

Hi Abe,

Maybe something along the lines like this:
http://photoshop-tutorials.wonderhowto.com/how-to/wrap-logo-around-photo-photoshop-15913/

It's not all that simple if you want to do a convincing job, but with proper preparation it can be done. Given the amount of warping needed to get down to the sides, it would help to use fairly large files, and perhaps adapt the artwork a bit to already have some angles in it.

Cheers,
Bart
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MarkM
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2013, 02:51:51 PM »
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So if it were me, I would probably advise the client to get someone to mockup up the comforter in a 3D modeling/rendering environment that would allow UV unwrapping. This allows flat images to map onto a 3D surface—in the right hands it is very convincing. You would still need photos to aid with the modeling and provide the room/light. Since the modeling requires quite a bit of work up front, it's probably not cost effective for only a couple variations. But if they are going to need a lot different designs, this will be quite a bit easier in the long run.
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designpartners
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2013, 03:58:39 PM »
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So if it were me, I would probably advise the client to get someone to mockup up the comforter in a 3D modeling/rendering environment that would allow UV unwrapping. This allows flat images to map onto a 3D surface—in the right hands it is very convincing. You would still need photos to aid with the modeling and provide the room/light. Since the modeling requires quite a bit of work up front, it's probably not cost effective for only a couple variations. But if they are going to need a lot different designs, this will be quite a bit easier in the long run.

I would definitely agree. Wrapping a pattern onto such an organic shape in photoshop convincingly really wouldn't be easy. But mocking it up and UV mapping while much cheaper for multiples still won't be cheap, but will give a far better result. 

James

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kirkt
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« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2013, 09:58:01 AM »
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If the scene surrounding the bed and comforter is important to the overall image, then you can use the traditional CG compositing technique of shooting an HDR spherical panoramic image within the scene and then drop in the CG bed/comforter and illuminate the CG element with the spherical HDR data from the scene.  This is often referred to as Image Based Lighting (IBL) and, at this point, all CG applications support it.

As stated above, your exercise will be much easier by UV mapping your graphic designs onto a CG comforter.  Because your CG object (especially the comforter) does not contain any reflective surfaces, you would likely not even need to use IBL techniques to get convincing lighting, because you do not need HDR reflections of the scene on your CG object. 

There are probably stock 3D models of beds and comforters that you could use, eliminating the need to have a model built from scratch, and a clever CG artist could actually use your background plate and model just the comforter, with some skillful lighting and compositing to make a convincing composite.  Many CG applications have utilities for deriving the virtual camera position and focal length from the actual camera data and background image, as well as soft body (cloth) dynamics that will permit the modeler to create a CG comforter that drapes and folds convincingly over some stand-in geometry (a box representing the bed).

Lots of ways, but pure PS manipulation would take a lot more time with less than optimal results - and that would have to be repeated for each comforter graphic.  You would likely get variation in the overall appearance of the composite between designs, where you really want uniformity in lighting, etc., so that the attention is on the design itself.

Good luck!

kirk
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abeofRD
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« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2013, 02:36:54 PM »
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Thank you all for guiding me forward.

I tried doing it in Photoshop with warping, Puppet Warping, & Liquify tool, it takes forever. Can't imagine if I'll need to do it for 20+ designs. I figured maybe the new 3D capabilities in Photoshop will help me but Oh men where do I start.

Meanwhile I posted on elance for a 3D artist to do it, hope to find one not to expensive.


Thank you all

Abe
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