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Author Topic: Does using front rise with Canon TS-E lenses affect the nodal point/stitching?  (Read 1719 times)
wallpaperviking
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« on: July 09, 2013, 08:03:27 AM »
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Hi, I am brand new to this forum so apologies if this is a very basic newbie question.  I did come across an older thread on here relating to using extenders with the Canon TS-E line but it gave me a warning to post a new topic.  I have replied to the older one as well as starting this new one..  Hope that is o.k. 

Basically, I can only afford one lens at the moment, so figure I have two options..

a)  Buy the 17mm TS-E and then use the 1.4x extender to get roughly a 24mm TS-E equivalent

b)  Buy the 24mm TS-E and use a Pano head for stitching for the rarer times I would need such a wide field of view..  Then also use the 1.4x Extender to get a 33.6mm TS-E.. 

The second option is definitely my preferred I think..

With the Stitching/Pano head, the query that I was hoping someone may be able to answer relates below

Was just wondering if you are using Canon TS-E lenses, whether using a front rise/fall effects the nodal point of a lens and therefore create issues when trying to stitch images together?

For example, if I was doing a 2-3 pano stitch and wanted to use front rise to keep verticals straight for architecture (keeping the front rise in the same position for each of the shots) would this work? Or does the nodal point vary as soon as you introduce any front rise/fall?

I know that by introducing tilt that this alters the nodal point and you would effectively have to realign your Pano head as soon as you introduce any tilt (obviously completely unsuitable for field work) but was just wondering if this also applies for rise/fall?

As I see it, my option for stitching for architecture would be extremely limited if I cannot apply front rise to the stitched images (can live without tilt )

Hope this is clear Smiley

Thanks so much!

Look forward to hearing from you guys and hoping someone can resolve this issue..
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2013, 11:32:13 AM »
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"Was just wondering if you are using Canon TS-E lenses, whether using a front rise/fall effects the nodal point of a lens and therefore create issues when trying to stitch images together? "

It can affect the stitching negatively by creating stitching errors but it depends on the subject and somewhat on the stitching software. Where I have seen problems with it is when the lens was shifted nearly to its limits while shooting dense skylines from relatively close position and rotatign the rig over a very wide angel.

Used another way, by not rotating  the panoramic rig and simply shifting the lens and then rotating it to create a wider but rectilinear view, I have had almost no problems except for being unable to resolve a extreme near/far parallax issue . In that case a railing was within a foot of the camera and the space beyond was twenty or more feet distant.

As to lens choice, you will probably find the 24mm TS-e more generally useful than the 17mm TS-E unless you are photographing small interior spaces.

Some notes on architecture and stitching If you are new to stitching:

-In my initial tests the Photoshop CC version of Photomerge is good enough that i am thinking of using that first instead of automatically choosing PTGui Pro which I have been relying on for a few years. Photomerge in earlier versions of Photoshop were not so good. Using Photomerge in Photoshop CC is also a faster process than PTGui. I don't know Auo Pano Pro or other stitching programs well enough to comment o nthem.

- Whichever stitching program you use  choose the layers + blended option when outputting the panorama. The resulting file will be very large but when you do find glitches along seams it makes it easier to resolve them and you can flatten it afterwards.
As to hardware, I use the Really Right Stuff PCL-1 panning clamp on top of the tripod head and use other RRs pieces above that as the shoot requires. sometimes a photo only needs a "nodal slide' and If I need to shoot a multi-row panorama, the full PG-02 panoramic rig (CB-10 or CB-18, PG-02 VA+clamp, and MPR-CL II nodal slide) gets used. I like the RRS approach to panoramic gear  over dedicated panoramic rigs as it is modular   and I can use the components for more than just panoramic work.
Check the architecture  and cityscape sections of my  website http://www.ellisvener.com for examples of my work.

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Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
wallpaperviking
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« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2013, 11:08:17 PM »
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Hi, Thanks so much for the reply, is greatly appreciated!  Am still trying to wrap my head around the whole process but I think I will aim for the 24mm TS-E and then figure it out from there with regards to the stitching part.. With the 1.4x Extender, I will then at least have two practical focal lengths.

Thanks again, is really helpful! 

 Smiley
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David Eichler
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« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2013, 11:30:42 PM »
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Small terminology point. I am quite sure someone will correct me if I am wrong, but I think that the consideration here is the entrance pupil (otherwise referred to as the no-parallax point) of the lens, rather than a nodal point. Actually, there are two nodal points: front and rear.
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