Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: USB controlled switch needed  (Read 2083 times)
PeterAit
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1949



WWW
« on: July 17, 2013, 07:14:01 AM »
ReplyReply

I am always forgetting to turn off my external RAID array. I am looking for a switch that sits between the array and the power. The switch is also plugged into a USB port on the computer, and the array is turned on or off based on the computer being on or off. Any such thing?
Logged

Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
Rhossydd
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1965


WWW
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2013, 08:01:23 AM »
ReplyReply

I use one of the plug adaptors that cuts power to an extension socket when it detects that the main computer has been switched off. When I power down the main unit it cuts power entirely to all screens, scanners, printers, anything else etc.
Mine was supplied FoC by my utility company, but this seems very similar:-
http://www.maplin.co.uk/automatic-pc-standby-shutdown-for-home-and-office-612687
Logged
tastar
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 50


WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2013, 07:32:22 AM »
ReplyReply

CyberPower Systems has surge protectors that have a master outlet - and that will shut down power to other outlets when the master device is powered down. Here's a decent quality one at this link on their website.

Tony
Logged
John.Murray
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 893



WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2013, 03:28:34 PM »
ReplyReply

Not sure whether you are using a UPS, but the APC BackUPS ES-750 has a master outlet than can be configured to control peripheral devices - highly recommended
Logged

PeterAit
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1949



WWW
« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2013, 03:41:54 PM »
ReplyReply

I do know about the UPS units that have a master outlet that controls other devices. That would be the ideal solution. The problem is that my Dell desktop has a "fancy" power supply that requires a UPS with a very fast switching speed. I don't know the supposed advantage of this, but I had to buy a special high-speed UPS that does not have the master outlet feature. Pain in the neck - but otherwise a reliable and excellent computer.
Logged

Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
John.Murray
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 893



WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2013, 12:33:14 AM »
ReplyReply

Whaaat? What model?

Dell marketing suits at work....

A computer that requires a very fast UPS switching speed?  Sounds like an under-designed power supply to me, or possibly lack of PS phases on the supply rails of the motherboard itself.  I honestly cannot imagine *any* advantage of a PS having this "feature", other that saving Dell money and presenting another marketing opportunity.

Current draw is current draw - any UPS with a master/slave configuration simply responds to that ....


So - back to your OP - what RAID array are you using?  Are there idle options?  Options for spinning down drives (effectively shutting them off)?
« Last Edit: July 20, 2013, 01:11:28 AM by John.Murray » Logged

PeterAit
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1949



WWW
« Reply #6 on: July 20, 2013, 08:29:37 AM »
ReplyReply

The computer is a Studio XPS. When I bought it some 3-1/2 years ago it was Dell's top of the line desktop. I plugged in into my existing UPS and did a test and the computer shut off. After some research this is what Dell told me, and I had to buy this higher-cost UPS to work with it. Of course you may be right, perhaps it's just a quirk of a poorly designed or cheap power supply and Dell was blowing smoke. Fact is, however, the system has been working without a single glitch for all this time.

My RAID is a Burly 2-bay unit with a host card from Mac Gurus - pretty bare bones setup.

Anyway, I decided to use a low tech approach to my problem - I moved the RAID box to where the power light is visible!
Logged

Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
BartvanderWolf
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3758


« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2013, 05:29:39 PM »
ReplyReply

The computer is a Studio XPS. When I bought it some 3-1/2 years ago it was Dell's top of the line desktop. I plugged in into my existing UPS and did a test and the computer shut off. After some research this is what Dell told me, and I had to buy this higher-cost UPS to work with it. Of course you may be right, perhaps it's just a quirk of a poorly designed or cheap power supply and Dell was blowing smoke. Fact is, however, the system has been working without a single glitch for all this time.

Dell is not blowing smoke! I have the same experience with a Dell Precision T7400 workstation, the UPS from APC didn't switch fast enough. I only found that out on a rare occasion that we experience an interruption of power-supply in the Netherlands, caused by local digging by another utilities company which damaged the sub-terrain power lines. I replaced it with a UPS from AEG, this time tested it by cutting the power myself, and that triggered the AEG unit without causing any problems.

Cheers,
Bart
Logged
EduPerez
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 694


WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2013, 04:16:47 AM »
ReplyReply

Do you really want to "pull the cord" on the RAID each time you switch the computer off?
I would have assumed that those units would need a proper "shut down".
Logged

PeterAit
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1949



WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 22, 2013, 06:42:07 AM »
ReplyReply

Not this one - it's just 2 disks in a box with an on/off switch. The controller is in the computer so any shut-down stuff would happen as the computer is shutting down.
Logged

Peter
"Photographic technique is a means to an end, never the end itself."
View my photos at http://www.peteraitken.com
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad