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Author Topic: Chile and Argentina  (Read 2487 times)
Slim
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« on: July 20, 2013, 04:43:04 PM »
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Thinking about going to Chile and Argentina for a few weeks during its summer time.
Need suggestions on what to see.  Patagonia is on my list.  These countries are both pretty.  Going to Tierra del Fuego and also trying to see
Iguazu Falls may be a lot of distance to cover.
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PhotoEcosse
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« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2013, 04:24:29 AM »
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Difficult to do it all in one trip, Slim. Scale a wee bit different to your recent trip to Scotland! Smiley

Maybe you need to split it into two and save some for another year.
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stever
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« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2013, 12:57:00 PM »
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middle of Dec to middle Feb is vacation time in Argentina and Chile and most of the destinations like Patagonia are crowded and the major cites are quiet- definitely need to plan in advance.  we were there this year from mid Feb to mid March starting with Buenos Aires, Santiago and Valparaiso before everyone came back from vacation then heading down to Patagonia.  weather was generally good and we had a great time.  Australis cruise in the Chilean fjords was spectacular if a bit pricey.  used Vaya Adventures to plan the trip and they did a great job.

for us, 2 days in Buenos Aires was plenty (we spent longer and also went to an Estancia in the pampas).  not much problem seeing Santiago in one full day but would have spent more than one day in Valparaiso in hindsight.  Vaya arranged for small neighborhood hotels close to local restaurants and subway stations which was great.

Saw Iguazo a few years ago - liked it better from the Brazil side - worth staying in the expensive hotel to get morning shots before the bus tours arrived, but going across the border can be a hassle - worth having a guide that knows the routine and border guards.
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andaremos
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« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2013, 02:40:45 PM »
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I spent Thanksgiving in Torres del Paine in 2010. We had great weather. They kept telling us how lucky we were because some people travel and never get to see the Torres. Bright sunny days and very few people on trails during their Spring. Managed to see Atacama in the north as well as TDP in a couple of weeks.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 02:42:20 PM by andaremos » Logged

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MoreOrLess
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« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2013, 12:44:22 AM »
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Torres Del Paine is amazing but personally if money/time is an issue I'd go for El Calafate/El Chalten in Argentina instead.

The Glacier cruises you can do from either beat Torres for me, especially the trip to the Upsala and Spegazzini glaciers from El Calafate. I think El Chalten beats Torres as a base for walking as well, the mountain scenary is just as amazing but the town is within walking distance so your not having to pay a premium for hotels and transport like in Torres. The walks to Laguna Los Tres and Laguna Torre can easily be done in a day and you can camp in the park to get sunrise/set ops. You could easily spend a week there and not run out of locations to visit, plus of course the potential for amazing weather.
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aebolzan
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« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2013, 09:38:17 AM »
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Visiting Argentina in summer (i.e. January to March) means going to places that use to be crowdy, particularly in El Chalten and Calafate. I was there last year but in April, probably the best time to see fall colours and less people......trekkings in El Chaltén are well indicated and people there are very very nice. El Calafate has only the Laguna Nimez if you like to see birds.....the only reason to go to El Calafate is because it is the nearest place to the glacier Perito Moreno where you can find a place to stay....and you have to book your flight quite in advance....after seeing the glacier (which is marvellous) near Calafate,  El Chaltén is THE PLACE for lanscapes in that region....very small town, so you have to book also in advance. I would recommend you to rent a car in Calafate, so you can go everywhere freely (there are buses but with restricted time tables and once you are in front of the Glacier you want to stay as much as possible there...). In El Chaltén mobiles do not work at all (nice thing, at least for me) and internet  could be slow (but possible). Iguazu Falls are also amaizing but in summer is very hot and wet.....and although is not the usual place for argentinians in summer, it can also be crowdy (vacations there).

Other places that you can visit in Argentina are: a) Peninsula Valdez (also Patagonia) and see orcas and sea lions. In February you can go there and Punta Tombo (plenty of Magallan penguins....i.e. about half million!). In Valdez there is a private place (Estancia Rincon Chico) that offers you accomodations and meals, and it is the best place to see sea elephants. In general, I would say that Valdez is better from July to October, as you can see the whales (lots of!) and navigate among them. b) on the west you have a place called Malargüe that is a wonderfull place for landscapes, a region of volcanic origin, so it is like a black and yellow desert (this because of the small plants that grow there). c) in the east I would suggest Esteros del Iberá, that works fine for every season....plenty of nature and wildlife....no petrol and mobiles there, so you arrive by a transfer from the lodge you have booked (no hotels at all...only some lodges...so a very very quiet place, far from technology and civilisation....very nice people there...); c) in the north you have the Andeans landscape, the famous Quebrada de Humahuaca (a UNESCO world heritage site), Purmamarca and Valles Calchaquies, that offers you a landscape of a very dry site but plenty of colours.

So, you see.....going to Argentina means a lot of possibilities for photography....from wet to dry, from cold to hot, from greenish to yellowish places.....particularly from January to middle March is when the local people go to those places (particularly to the south Patagonia), so think about it. Argentina is not a place very well prepared for tourism, so in the high season it is complicated to find a hotel in the most visited places if it was not booked previously. I use to go to Patagonia in February, but always to less known places. One of the interesting things about Patagonia is that it is so vast that you can always visit something different where tourists usually don't go......but it also requires to take your time....(two weeks at least!).

Sorry if I was a little long, but I wanted to give you some details particularly about what you can expect from Argentina.....

Agustin
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Slim
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« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2013, 08:39:28 AM »
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Thank you all for your advice so far.  I am currently narrowing down my options.   If anyone has more advice i would love to hear it.
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shadowblade
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« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2013, 03:04:54 AM »
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Thank you all for your advice so far.  I am currently narrowing down my options.   If anyone has more advice i would love to hear it.


I'm currently putting together a photo trip to Patagonia in December (dates are flexible at the moment):

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=81074.0

Looking for more people to join, in order to share costs. It's a dedicated photo trip, so, while in the national parks, we'll be camping in locations chosen for their sunrise/sunset photographic potential, rather than just in the refuges or lodges (which tend to be further away from points of interest). And we'll have porter support to help carry gear (you don't want to be carrying food, camping gear, etc. when you're already carrying cameras and tripods).

I'm also possibly doing Iguazu Falls, Tierra del Fuego and a few other places on my own at the same time.
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Rob Whitehead
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« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2013, 07:19:26 AM »
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I camped out at perito moreno glacier to get more photo time in. In winter. Was a bit cold.

Spent 10 days photographing 'the toz' - the towers themselves are chico y feo, but the Frances Valley - my favourite place on earth (probably).

Los Glaciers is also a good place for some winter fun. I 'considered' spending the night on cerro electrico, but then found the path in the dark by the light of my flashgun...

Have fun!
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Carpe lucem
Slim
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« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2013, 11:14:40 AM »
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Okay, I've decided, I will not be going to Patagonia, but will instead make the trip down to Antarctica.  Opening a new thread on this one.
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