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Author Topic: circular polarizer with least flare?  (Read 2069 times)
Ellis Vener
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« on: July 22, 2013, 02:15:08 PM »
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I'll be asking this elsewhere as well but I'd like some input on what brand of circular polarizers you find have the least problems with flare. I do not shoot a lot of landscape work but do shoot a lot of interiors and I'd like to know if anyone has better experience with flare suppression with one make of Polarizer over another, also preferably with the least amount color shift as well.
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Ellis Vener
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PeterAit
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« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2013, 02:21:11 PM »
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I can't compare with other brands, but I have had excellent results with the Hoya filters.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #2 on: July 22, 2013, 02:24:54 PM »
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Hoya makes at least four different models of Polarizer. Which one have you been using Peter?
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Ellis Vener
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NashvilleMike
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« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2013, 02:41:07 PM »
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I'm a fan of either the Zeiss polarizers or the B+W Kaesman MRC thin myself. The Zeiss is quite good on the color/spectral front, and that T* coating is the real deal. Not cheap though...

-m
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2013, 02:52:10 PM »
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Mike: I will check out the Zeiss. I tried the B&W the other day and there was too much color shift. The Nikon Circular Polarizer I tried was far more neutral, but they don't make it in the size I need (82mm).
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Ellis Vener
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Lee Rentz
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« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2013, 04:41:42 PM »
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I am using a 95mm multi-coated Heliopan circular polarizer; it has good flare resistance and seems better-constructed than the B + W (I had two of them start binding upon turning, then break apart and fall on the ground, shattering the glass). I have been using this one for about a year, and the color rendition is very good.
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Paul2660
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« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2013, 05:14:32 PM »
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Ellis:

I use both the Heliopan's, or Hoya Pro 1 series.   The Hoya's are slim but still have front threads.  The Helopan's are made with brass rings and area very well made, but they also are quite heavy. 

Here is a link to the BH site with the Hoya:
http://http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/391185-REG/Hoya_XD77CRPL_77mm_Circular_Polarizing_Pro.html

Also you might consider Tiffen's pro line as they have IR filtering.  This is nice feature for outdoor work on longer exposures. 

Paul Caldwell


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Paul Caldwell
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Jason DiMichele
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« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2013, 07:05:50 PM »
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+1 to the Hoya Pro 1 series. And I've never had any problem with any of the B+W filters. I've always purchased my filters from www.2filter.com for some really good prices.

Cheers!



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Jason DiMichele
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Paul2660
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« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2013, 08:01:11 PM »
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I love 2filter also.  But they quit selling Hoya about a year or so ago.  They lead with Marumi which cost less but work well also.  I have a 95mm Marumi that works great no flare.  They use aluminum and can bind. 

If you call 2filter make sure you ask for Andrea.


Paul Caldwell
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Paul Caldwell
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rgs
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« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2013, 09:36:02 PM »
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I have a Marumi CPL (from 2filter). It seems very well made, optically excellent and I have found no problem with flare. It's a little less expensive than other premium brands.
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #10 on: July 28, 2013, 11:58:39 PM »
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I have been using this for nearly one year... works great. the light loss is a lot less than with other PL filters which is a key feature for pano shooting in forest environment as is speeds up each frame by a factor of 2 every other thing being equal.

http://www.kenkoglobal.com/zeta-ex_features.html

Although the Kenko Zeta seems to be identical to the Hoya HD series outside Japan, the Zeta EX seems to have no equivalent. They are both positionned above the Pro1.

Cheers,
Bernard
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 04:46:07 AM by BernardLanguillier » Logged

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PhotoEcosse
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« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2013, 01:40:49 PM »
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7-Day Shop's own brand (made, I think by Hama) work well for me.

But I think the question of flare will differ from lens to lens and some filters may be better on certain lenses and other filters on other lenses.

Colour "shift", if it is noticeable, should be easily corrected in Lightroom.
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« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2013, 01:28:19 PM »
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Ellis,

I'm surprised that no one has linked to these articles, yet. Here is some testing on multiple brands. It appears that the B+W's fare the best. You can get the actual flare results on the Excel file link located part way down the page of chapter 4.

http://www.lenstip.com/115.1-article-Polarizing_filters_test_Introduction.html

http://www.lenstip.com/119.1-article-Polarizing_filters_test_-_supplement.html

Barry
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Lee Rentz
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« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2013, 01:44:12 PM »
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My problem with B + W was not the flare resistance or optical quality, but the mechanical action. I use a 95mm filter on the front of a wide angle lens, and have had two B + W filters in five years break apart and fall onto the rocks, shattering the glass. It wasn't a good thing to have happen when I was on an assignment.
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Bearmann
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« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2013, 01:55:44 PM »
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My problem with B + W was not the flare resistance or optical quality, but the mechanical action. I use a 95mm filter on the front of a wide angle lens, and have had two B + W filters in five years break apart and fall onto the rocks, shattering the glass. It wasn't a good thing to have happen when I was on an assignment.

This seems to be a not uncommon complaint with the Hoya polarizers, but this is the first I heard of it with the B+W's.
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AlfSollund
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« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2013, 04:40:52 PM »
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Generally a multicoated is better. But you can reduce the flare a lot with lens hood. or something shading sun or bright light from hitting surface of filter. My experience is also that a filter sitting closer to lens element is the better.

Best of luck!
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