Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Canson Papers  (Read 2784 times)
camerashy
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« on: July 25, 2013, 12:53:38 PM »
ReplyReply

I have, over the years, bought a lot of test packs to try including St Cuthberts, Ilford, Kodak, Canson, Innova, Harman and Hahnemuhle.
 I now want to reduce my paper purchase to just a few suppliers and have decided on the following:
 Ilford Smooth Gloss for A4 day to day printing.
 Epson Premium Glossy Photo for 7x5 prints
 Canson Batryta Photographique for Glossy upto A3+ printing
 Canson Platine for Fine Art upto A3+ printing
 Canson Photographique Rag for upto A3+ printing ( I have not finally made my mind up with this paper but like the matt quality and weight)

 Any comments on my choice please.
 thanks
 Dave
Logged
Mr. Capp
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 60


« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2013, 03:04:13 PM »
ReplyReply

I would add the newer ilford prestige smooth pearl 310, my fave rc so far, heavier, great surface,
Nice gamut and canned profile.

Other than that I'd vote for the platine for best rag.
Logged
hugowolf
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 639


« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2013, 07:39:57 PM »
ReplyReply

I have, over the years, bought a lot of test packs to try including St Cuthberts, Ilford, Kodak, Canson, Innova, Harman and Hahnemuhle.
 I now want to reduce my paper purchase to just a few suppliers and have decided on the following:
 Ilford Smooth Gloss for A4 day to day printing.
 Epson Premium Glossy Photo for 7x5 prints
 Canson Batryta Photographique for Glossy upto A3+ printing
 Canson Platine for Fine Art upto A3+ printing
 Canson Photographique Rag for upto A3+ printing ( I have not finally made my mind up with this paper but like the matt quality and weight)

 Any comments on my choice please.
I would question your terminology, but they are all fine papers. It is difficult to question paper choice, because it is such a personal thing. *Canson Baryta Photographique is not, by any means, a glossy paper.)

Brian A
Logged
marcmccalmont
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1731



« Reply #3 on: July 26, 2013, 07:58:13 AM »
ReplyReply

Dave
I went through this search a few months ago and ended up liking the following papers;
Glossy: Canson Photo High Gloss Premium RC
Satin:  Canson Baryta and Platine Photographic
Matte: Moab Summerset Museum Rag
Marc
« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 08:53:03 AM by marcmccalmont » Logged

Marc McCalmont
hugowolf
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 639


« Reply #4 on: July 26, 2013, 09:20:04 AM »
ReplyReply

If one were to question anything, it would be: Why both Canson Baryta and Platine? Dry un-inked areas are very similar. The textures are a little more different in inked areas, but not so much as to warrant carrying both, if you are printing for yourself.

Brian A
Logged
marcmccalmont
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1731



« Reply #5 on: July 26, 2013, 09:28:06 AM »
ReplyReply

If one were to question anything, it would be: Why both Canson Baryta and Platine? Dry un-inked areas are very similar. The textures are a little more different in inked areas, but not so much as to warrant carrying both, if you are printing for yourself.

Brian A
I purchased both to test and they are very similar except texture...so I threw it out as an option, personal taste
Marc
Logged

Marc McCalmont
marcmccalmont
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1731



« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2013, 05:04:34 AM »
ReplyReply

Dave
I went through this search a few months ago and ended up liking the following papers;
Glossy: Canson Photo High Gloss Premium RC
Satin:  Canson Baryta and Platine Photographic
Matte: Moab Summerset Museum Rag
Marc

BTY I used the spectrumviz.jar tool of Ernst Dinkla to pre-sort the papers based upon a flat spectral response, the logic being if the paper is spectrally flat then the profile doesn't have to work so hard at correcting colors. I used the inexpensive color munki photo for profiling and am very pleased with the results
Logged

Marc McCalmont
camerashy
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 6


« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2013, 05:13:00 AM »
ReplyReply

Many Thanks for the detailed reply, Marc, really interesting info.
thanks
Dave
Logged
Ernst Dinkla
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2890


« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2013, 07:04:01 AM »
ReplyReply


Glossy: Canson Photo High Gloss Premium RC


Marc,

That paper is a Felix Schoeller product in my opinion, few that have it in the catalog. Arca in The Netherlands used to have it but no longer distributes it.

--
Met vriendelijke groet, Ernst

http://www.pigment-print.com/spectralplots/spectrumviz_1.htm
July 2013, 500+ inkjet media white spectral plots.

Logged
Idololab
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 72


WWW
« Reply #9 on: July 27, 2013, 09:32:15 AM »
ReplyReply

Has anybody noticed something like crystallic dust where the roll paper is cut by the rotary cutter blade on the 9900 printer. I notice this with the Platine roll paper and I want to know if this is normal or maybe I have an old (not fresh) roll. I have never noticed this on another Fine art paper.
Thanks
Logged

George Marinos
http://www.idololab.gr/
Fine art Photolab
Athens,Greece
BrianWJH
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 166


« Reply #10 on: July 27, 2013, 06:33:15 PM »
ReplyReply

Has anybody noticed something like crystallic dust where the roll paper is cut by the rotary cutter blade on the 9900 printer.
Thanks

I seem to remember that Canson Platine has a silica surface coating, so maybe this is what you are seeing.

Brian.
Logged
hugowolf
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 639


« Reply #11 on: July 27, 2013, 07:49:03 PM »
ReplyReply

I seem to remember that Canson Platine has a silica surface coating, so maybe this is what you are seeing.

So it is rumoured, but it is all very proprietary. It could be mostly barium sulphate (baryta), with additions of titanium dioxide and silica (white carbon black), with binding agents. Not being privy to their internal secrets and not being a chemical engineer, I donít know how well the three mix.

Brian A
Logged
Idololab
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 72


WWW
« Reply #12 on: July 28, 2013, 06:27:57 AM »
ReplyReply

My concerns about this interesting paper are:
1) if this dust can cause any kind of problems to the 9900 (or any printer) and
2)if this means something bad for the quality and the longevity of the print.
In other words can we consider this paper as a good archival, Fine Art paper?
 
Logged

George Marinos
http://www.idololab.gr/
Fine art Photolab
Athens,Greece
JRSmit
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 403


WWW
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2013, 08:03:22 AM »
ReplyReply

My concerns about this interesting paper are:
1) if this dust can cause any kind of problems to the 9900 (or any printer) and
2)if this means something bad for the quality and the longevity of the print.
In other words can we consider this paper as a good archival, Fine Art paper?
 
check aardenburg for longevity.
Logged

Fine art photography: janrsmit.com
Fine Art Printing Specialist: www.fineartprintingspecialist.nl


Jan R. Smit
Sal Baker
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 140


« Reply #14 on: July 29, 2013, 08:03:10 PM »
ReplyReply

My concerns about this interesting paper are:
1) if this dust can cause any kind of problems to the 9900 (or any printer) and
2)if this means something bad for the quality and the longevity of the print.
In other words can we consider this paper as a good archival, Fine Art paper?
 
I would imagine there are many archival materials that produce dust when cut, wood for one.

Sal
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad