Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: My Ultimate Z3X00ps Printer  (Read 827 times)
Mark Lindquist
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 314


« on: July 28, 2013, 08:45:52 AM »
ReplyReply

Just thinking about what would be an off the wall ultimate printer - an evolved Z3200ps.

Here is MY Ultimate:

Stock Z 3200ps Modified
Has an internal scanner capable of scanning 44" x x Length.
Embedded Spectro (as is)
Larger Ink Cartridges (at least double volume) (added per Ron - colorwave)

Material handling/maintenance:
Has a vacuum system with brushes top and bottom that vacuums the top and bottom of canvas upon entry into the printer.
Has an internal air/vacuum maintenance/cleaning system that runs at same schedule as drip system.


Finish protection:
An extra cartridge that bonds with ink and provides an initial top coat.  A UV curing light cures the print as it is exiting the printer.
(The idea is that an initial top coat fuses the inks, causing "back-gassing" through the back of the canvas.  Few if any flakes can occur once a top finish is cured).

A working, idiot-proof canvas cutter is included, able to cut any thickness.

Maintenance: The entire body of the printer is designed so that the body easily opens up or comes off so that any part can be easily accessed for repair.  An LED Screen details BEFOREHAND, parts that are in need of replacement.  The carriage belt is easily replaced - it is NOT a continuous Gilmer type belt, but rather a line (not loop) that attaches manually to the carriage (unless a fastener that affixes to the carriage allows for quick change).  When the belt begins to degrade, a new one can be replaced easily.

All moving parts have a central line to an oil resevoir and are automatically, periodically oiled.

Calibrating and profiling:
First the calibration runs in a continuous line across the page width until finished.  The process is designed to minimize waste in calibrating substrates.  Next, the profiling starts where the calibration leaves off. (Or just one row is skipped).  The profiling runs in a continuous line as it currently does, across the width of the paper.  Very little waste occurs.  An additional feature is included if checked:  the profile is diagnosed, analyzed for optimal use. A diagnostic chart may be printed to show weakness or strengths of the substrate.

Additional papers library.  All known papers are stored in a "paper reference library"  Any paper such as Epson Velvet, for example, is compared to various other similar papers and finally compared to the best match for creating a custom profile.  Any other paper can be run through the printer for a "paper diagnostic" and the printer reads the paper and determines what is the best match for making a custom profile.

Unlimited custom papers profile storage.  Each custom paper can have up to 10 iterations or custom profiles associated with it for different effects.

Certain models have an extra axis, allowing the printer to move up to print on thicker substrates.  Also, the printer has an option to print in a pass through configuration.

Sheet feed capabilities.  A magazine slot is include so that preloaded paper trays may be added for custom jobs.  When a tray is loaded, it is automatically sensed.

Paper path.  A special pull out roll that has an ultra smooth surface pulls out (like a window shade) and the printed substrate follows the path, whether it be on the floor or a table in front of the printer.  No more folding up in a basket (which would remain an option).

View when printing.  An internal light is included that shows the print being printed.  

OK.  You get the idea.  If you'd like to participate, think outside of the box and inside of the box.  What other things could be added that even seeming outrageous might be awesome to incorporate into a future design.

This is the "Z3X00 PS of the future - probably will never be built, but just dreaming and having fun with it.  Never know, some interesting things could come out of it.

What would you like to see in a fully tricked out model?

-Mark

« Last Edit: July 28, 2013, 06:16:11 PM by Mark Lindquist » Logged
Colorwave
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 999


WWW
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2013, 12:59:43 PM »
ReplyReply

Nice job, Mark.  I can't think of anything you might have missed, except perhaps larger cartridges.

Too bad that HP isn't interested in partnering with you on this project.  That may contribute to a slightly later launch date.  Be sure to post a link to your Kickstarter page, though. :-)
Logged

Mark Lindquist
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 314


« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2013, 06:14:03 PM »
ReplyReply

Hey Ron -
Yeah, like HP is ever going to do something like that. LOL.  Nice touch with the Kickstarter page - too funny.

"Everybody's got a dream... what's your dream?"


Oh well, just a little fun.  I'll add the larger carts to the list.

Thanks -

-Mark
Logged
Colorwave
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 999


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2013, 06:33:29 PM »
ReplyReply

After reading about what people are doing with older Roland printers here (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=80329.0), I wouldn't say that at least some of the things on your list could never be achieved.  Unfortunately, the vacuum system might be asking a little much to install as a retrofit.  I just wish that HP's ADD with hardware would lead them to another about face:  this time in the fine art printing market.  Much less trivial decisions have been made by them, reversed, and then reversed again (tablets, PCs, Palm, etc.).  Their dominance in archival ink properties is largely being wasted on their display printers . . . let's build one of these suckers, make sure that it is very SHINY, and perhaps they will decide to flirt with the fine art market again as a "hobby."
Logged

Mark Lindquist
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 314


« Reply #4 on: July 29, 2013, 04:58:05 PM »
ReplyReply

After reading about what people are doing with older Roland printers here (http://www.luminous-landscape.com/forum/index.php?topic=80329.0), I wouldn't say that at least some of the things on your list could never be achieved.


It's interesting what they are doing.  It's on a small scale, but very interesting.  Where will they be in 5 years..., in ten years, etc.?

Unfortunately, the vacuum system might be asking a little much to install as a retrofit.

I dunno, Ron.  Adding a vacuum system externally would work.  Also, the current paper spindle could function as a holder for a "Brush Hood" that paper from another spindle feeds through (hard to explain without a napkin to draw on, LOL).  Heck, for that matter, a Brush Hood with a vacuum attachment would work as well.  The "hood" is a relatively easy kluge to construct - several "shop vac" wide-brush attachments lined up side by side with two sets (top and bottom) and pvc fittings hooking them all together serving dually as an armature should do the trick for a prototype.

 I just wish that HP's ADD with hardware would lead them to another about face:  this time in the fine art printing market.  Much less trivial decisions have been made by them, reversed, and then reversed again (tablets, PCs, Palm, etc.).  Their dominance in archival ink properties is largely being wasted on their display printers . . . let's build one of these suckers, make sure that it is very SHINY, and perhaps they will decide to flirt with the fine art market again as a "hobby."

You've got that right for sure.  I'm thinking of something prototypy like a cross between a Buck Roger's Spaceship and a Polaroid PDC 3000 camera outta do it.... Grin
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 05:05:25 PM by Mark Lindquist » Logged
Colorwave
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 999


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 29, 2013, 05:15:50 PM »
ReplyReply

Purrrrrrrfect, Mark.  Don't forget the blinking lights.  And remember, I've got your back, so forge ahead without fear.

PS:  Thanks for sharing that Polaroid camera photo.  Until I Googled it, I had somehow missed that camera altogether.  The swivel lens Nikon Coolpix 990 that I owned was a wannabe camera, for those too timid to wield the styling of the Polaroid.  Had I only known.
Logged

Mark Lindquist
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 314


« Reply #6 on: July 29, 2013, 07:43:17 PM »
ReplyReply

Purrrrrrrfect, Mark.  Don't forget the blinking lights.  And remember, I've got your back, so forge ahead without fear.

PS:  Thanks for sharing that Polaroid camera photo.  Until I Googled it, I had somehow missed that camera altogether.  The swivel lens Nikon Coolpix 990 that I owned was a wannabe camera, for those too timid to wield the styling of the Polaroid.  Had I only known.

Man, I had a PDC 2000 and a 3000.  Those were some cameras back then, really.  They even had a RAW feature built in to the software.  At that time, the only major cameras that could compete were the Kodaks with Nikon lenses and the Minolta digital 35mm cameras.

The Minolta RD 175 was quite the camera in its day.  It was the only game changer at the time.  All these cameras were several thousands of dollars as well, but not the $10-15K of the Kodaks of the day.  Either the Minolta or the Polaroid PDC's were the only other option, except maybe the 4x5 scan backs that were being developed.

The Minolta RD175 was also sold as the Agfa ActionCam and cost about $10,000.00 in 1995 - and had a whopping 1.75 mega-pixel resolution.  I had one of those bad boys.  The photo below is the snap I took when I sold it on Ebay.  The crazy thing is that they are being sold as collectors items today:

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=minolta%20rd%20175&clk_rvr_id=505231088558&adpos=1t1&crlp=10271137326_2416792&MT_ID=70&tt_encode=raw&keyword=minolta+rd+175&geo_id=10232&adgroup_id=3087780726&crdt=0

The PDC 2000 and 3000 are still around on Ebay - you can pick them up for a song:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/POLAROID-PDC-2000-40-VINTAGE-DIGITAL-CAMERA-CASE-MANUAL-SHIP-WORLDWIDE-/111130527718?pt=Digital_Cameras&hash=item19dfe547e6

"In 1996, Polaroid released the PDC-2000 and established a new image-quality benchmark, at a retail price ($2,495) that fell squarely between digital point & shoots and the much more expensive high-end portable digital cameras...."

At the time (1995-1996) these cameras were no joke.  I got a Nikon Coolpix 990 next and thought I was sitting in high cotton!  Man that swivel lens was the cat's pajamas wasn't it?  The good thing about the Polaroid and the Minolta Digital cameras was that they got me into Photoshop relatively early on in the game with release 4.0 (Big Electric Cat), then Adobe 5.0 and so forth.

I quickly graduated to a DSLR and spent more and more money staying on the bleeding edge, even had a Phase One 4x5 Back at one point - what a pain.  I have pretty much quit at the Nikon D3s with a closet full of really good glass now, and find it serves most of my needs, except when I have to do something more major.  It's amazing what can be squeezed out of the current DSLR's right now - just amazing, considering using a printer like the Z3200ps.  When I think of how we struggled to get really clean really super prints and mostly thought a Cibachrome was the cat's ass, I can't believe pulling all those 8x10 chromes and 4x5, etc, for so many years.  But surprise, surprise, they still hold up, even today.

Now as for printers, that's a whole nother story, LOL.

Have to say I'm really very happy with the Z3200ps.  It is a marvel, just an awesome machine.  As far as the redesign, some of the things I mention in the list could be important improvements, but obviously, anything of the scale I'm talking about, no one could afford.  But wouldn't it be fun to take that baby out for a spin?

Are there NO OTHER gadgeteers on LL?  Come on gear-heads, chip in with your ideas!!!  I can't build this by myself....

 Roll Eyes Roll Eyes Roll Eyes
« Last Edit: July 29, 2013, 07:46:40 PM by Mark Lindquist » Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad