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Author Topic: Your Merrill is on a tripod, you carefully compose the image, focus, & then . .  (Read 1035 times)
rogerxnz
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« on: July 29, 2013, 06:33:36 AM »
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. . . you press the shutter button with your bloody great finger and ruin everything!

Now there could be the perfect solution—a cable release adapter so you can take photos with no vibration and no delay!

Take photos the way Ansel Adams and all the great masters did.

Please note that, in the attached photo, the [PRESS] button end of the cable release is just resting against the cable release adapter and you move and hold it to suit your way of working.

The adapter clips on over the wheel around the shutter release in seconds and can be removed equally quickly. It does leave a few scuff marks on the top plate of the camera.

I used to make similar adapters for the Canon G1 and I cannot decide whether to set up for the Merrill's or not.

Let me know if you want one and what you consider a fair price. They are handmade (about an hour for each) because I do not think there will be enough demand to set up for mass production.

I am interested in your feedback.
Roger
« Last Edit: July 30, 2013, 05:03:26 AM by rogerxnz » Logged

Roger Hayman
Wellington, New Zealand
snoleoprd
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« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2013, 11:05:44 AM »
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Interesting fix and clever, since I do not own one of these cameras, is there no self-timer? A lot of times I will use the self timer to allow time for the tripod and vibrations to go away before exposing the image. Just a thought and I probably missing something obvious with those cameras.

Alan
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Alan Smallbone
Orange County, CA
NancyP
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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2013, 12:35:20 PM »
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I use the self-timer (10 sec).
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rogerxnz
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« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2013, 05:00:48 AM »
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Self-timing is great for static shots (if you have the time to wait for the camera to fire) but many shots have moving objects, such as clouds, waves and people.

If you want to capture such images at a particular moment, such as, when the light comes through a gap in the clouds to light up a feature in the landscape, self-timing, even for 2 seconds, may mean you miss the moment.

With a cable release, you could take two shots in even just a 2-second delay.

Horses for courses!
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Roger Hayman
Wellington, New Zealand
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