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Author Topic: StretchRelief – Breathing Color  (Read 2513 times)
Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2013, 06:40:00 AM »
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Jason... when using UC stretchers and the keys, how much canvas 'moves'.  In other words, if I have an image with something like mirrored edges and use the keys to tighten the stretch, is the edge going to wrap around to the sides?  (sorry to hijack the thread Darren but been meaning to ask this about using keys - my apologies).
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Mike Guilbault
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Jason DiMichele
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« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2013, 07:26:20 AM »
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Jason... when using UC stretchers and the keys, how much canvas 'moves'.  In other words, if I have an image with something like mirrored edges and use the keys to tighten the stretch, is the edge going to wrap around to the sides?  (sorry to hijack the thread Darren but been meaning to ask this about using keys - my apologies).

Hi Mike,

It depends a bit on the canvas (I've been using Hahnemuhle Daguerre since I've been using the UC stretchers).  However, as long as you tap the keys evenly all around, it's going to look pretty much the same. If the canvas is stretched about 1mm each way (depending on how many key "taps" you do), that's barely going to move the canvas and will make it drum tight. The wrapped "seam" will still be on the rounded corner of the stretcher. I typically start with 3 light taps for each key. Even when I get the canvas drum tight without the keys (using StretchRelief), I still tap the keys in at least one "tap" and put a dab of glue just to keep them there should the canvas need to be tightened in the future depending on how much the humidity shifts where the print will be hanging.


Cheers!
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Jason DiMichele
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www.jasondimichele.com
Bullfrog
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« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2013, 08:33:59 AM »
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Hi bullfrog,

I think you mentioned that you used the same stretcher bars as I do (from upper canada stretchers). If that's the case, you should have absolutely no problem getting the canvases drum tight using the keys. I've even hand tightened some large canvases by hand and then used the keys to get the canvas drum tight.

The StretchRelief pliers are definitely expensive. However, considering the time it would take to build something similar (enhancing a standard set of vice grips) would cost me more (in time and close enough to the cost) to make them. In my opinion these really are much better than vice grips. The surface area of the plate, the grid of spike grips, etc make stretching canvas very efficient and consistent.

Cheers!

Hi
Yes, I use the same bars.  I think it could certainly be technique - but I'm thinking it has more to do with the varnish I use which IF I apply more than 2 coats - makes the canvas very thick and more difficult to tension.

The point raised in this thread about rippling therefore concerns me.  I'm working with a different substrate - and putting all else aside, its a concern that I believe would be magnified when using my varnished canvas.
  
On keys, I have (sadly) had the experience of tapping a key into the bar to tighten a wrapped canvas only to find the key perforate the canvas - literally go through the other side.  This has been a very frustrating situation - and reading their UCart website - it seems some keys need to be adjusted BEFORE you bang them in (ie ensure they are fat enough wedge so that the point of the key cannot slip through).

SO - since I managed to do that on TWO canvases (screaming could be heard within a 10 km radius) - my workflow is like this:
1.  Assemble bars
2.  Measure diam both ways to ensure they match within 1/8 of inch
3.  STAPLE corners to prevent the bars from shifting when I stretch and to keep them square
4.  Add keys to each corner (tap in enough to keep them there)
5  Wrap canvas (by hand)
6.  Cut off excess canvas on corners as per the video I posted the other day (Mike saw it)
6.  Use hair blow dryer to heat up corners of canvas (about 10 seconds on high)
7.    After making the sign of the cross and 10 hail Mary's wrap the *&@ corners.

What I should do is add glue to keys as you do to keep them there.

It works.   I have to discipline myself to make each corner a mirror image - in other words, the overlap should be on the top of the canvas, not the sides.  I'm left handed so its something I have to practice and concentrate to ensure each corner is wrapped correctly as it is hard to fix.

As far as the pliers - they are overpriced but that was not the point - the point was - I'm not reducing my image size to 18" (vs 20) to allow 3 " on each side which is plier requirement and/or I'm not ditching my 24" printer (which already is underused and has a negative ROI)  in order to spend another $5000 to buy a NEW printer just so that I can use these pliers.

When I checked websites on machine wrapping - they stipulate they need even LESS salvage than I currently have (if my memory is correct) which means I can get a wider bar (1 1/2") with 2" borders. THIS is appealing to me and something I want to test (ie outsource and have someone wrap one for me)

Bottom line:  Glad it works for you and again, any donations towards a new 44" printer are welcome and appreciated
 Grin.  
« Last Edit: August 02, 2013, 09:15:16 AM by Bullfrog » Logged
Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2013, 04:05:11 PM »
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I may have to try the UC stretchers.  I get mine pre-made from my frame supplier, at a reasonable price, but they are not keyed.  If the stretching machines need even less canvas then i look forward to the day my volume increases enough to justify one of those.  Sorry Bullfrog, but I can't swing a donation right now... just ordered a couple of 700ml ink cartridges and I'm broke! Wink
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Mike Guilbault
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Bullfrog
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« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2013, 06:50:39 PM »
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I may have to try the UC stretchers.  I get mine pre-made from my frame supplier, at a reasonable price, but they are not keyed.  If the stretching machines need even less canvas then i look forward to the day my volume increases enough to justify one of those. 

I like the supplier -and the bars are good quality. 
In terms of cost - I'm investigating outsourcing to compare the relative cost .    LIke everything volume makes for economies of scale so what works for one may not financial sense for another.  The issue of convenience does arise - its easier to do it yourself on your own schedule.

Good luck. 

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Jason DiMichele
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« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2013, 07:25:48 PM »
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I may have to try the UC stretchers.  I get mine pre-made from my frame supplier, at a reasonable price, but they are not keyed.  If the stretching machines need even less canvas then i look forward to the day my volume increases enough to justify one of those.  Sorry Bullfrog, but I can't swing a donation right now... just ordered a couple of 700ml ink cartridges and I'm broke! Wink


Hey Mike,

I totally hear ya' on the 700ml cartridges.. It would be great sometimes if my 11880 would allow me to take smaller cartridges sometimes.. Especially the colours that I don't go through that fast! Smiley

Cheers!
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Jason DiMichele
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2013, 10:47:12 PM »
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I bought these stretching pliers from the main guy who made them before they went to BC and I couldn't be happier.  Drum tight stretches every single time.  I don't know what I'd do if I didn't have these.
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #27 on: August 03, 2013, 09:10:59 AM »
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Yes, its a conspiracy I'm sure.  Anyway, I'm not above taking charity so if anyone wants to donate a new 44" printer - pm me
 Wink

Otherwise, buying a giant printer ONLY because I need it to use special pliers that (lets be honest here) are clearly overpriced vice grips so that I can increase my borders which results in my throwing away MORE ink and paper during production seems...well - (searching brain for politically correct term)

Never mind.

Cheers
 Cool

PS:  I think if it comes to that, I will outsource.

Not sure if getting a 44" printer has much to do with just creating a little more edge to grip with pliers.
It has everything to do with offering larger prints and wraps.
I started with the Epson 7900 and in a month saw the limitations with the small sizes so I bought the 9900.
Now approximately 75% of my print and mount sales could not be accomplished with the smaller 7900.
My shop is not a production shop by any means. When I get the caller that says my regular printer can only do gallery wraps to 19 x 30 and I want 24 x 36
 I am ready.



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Photopro888
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« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2013, 09:31:18 AM »
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Thanks to everyone for providing lots of great info here! I think I will be ordering the StretchRelief soon… unfortunately I have a bunch of canvas prints all coating and ready to go that most likely don’t have enough extra canvas for the pliers to grip. Oh well, I will have to start printing with the extra canvas to work with the StratchRelief.

Thanks again!

-Darren
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rgvsdigitalpimp
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« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2013, 02:15:21 PM »
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I use 2" mirror edge for the wrap and leave 2" of slack on each side for the pliers.  So if I am printing a 16x20, with mirror edges it becomes 20x24.  Then the printing measurements for the print is 44" wide by 28" tall.  The only downfall with using the pliers is not being able to print two prints side by side to save canvas.  There's just not enough extra room around the both prints.  Unless of course you're printing two 11x14's or 12x16's
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Bullfrog
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« Reply #30 on: August 03, 2013, 03:09:52 PM »
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 I am ready.


Good for you! 
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Jason DiMichele
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« Reply #31 on: August 05, 2013, 12:25:22 PM »
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Not sure if getting a 44" printer has much to do with just creating a little more edge to grip with pliers.
It has everything to do with offering larger prints and wraps.
I started with the Epson 7900 and in a month saw the limitations with the small sizes so I bought the 9900.
Now approximately 75% of my print and mount sales could not be accomplished with the smaller 7900.
My shop is not a production shop by any means. When I get the caller that says my regular printer can only do gallery wraps to 19 x 30 and I want 24 x 36
 I am ready.

Hi Dan,

I totally agree with your comment. I also believe that should one sell some large pieces of their art or some large canvases for others the cost of the printer can be recouped relatively quickly. When I made my first large commercial art sale they wanted 13 prints, 5 of them 56x72". The cost of a pro lab doing this almost paid for at least half of my 11880. So I definitely think it's worth stretching for the costs of at least a 44" printer if printing canvas (or even fine art paper) is something that one plans on providing for more than just personal printing.

Cheers!
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Jason DiMichele
Fine Art Photographer and Printer
www.jasondimichele.com
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