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Author Topic: Set Default Settings with Camera Calibration  (Read 1382 times)
Kevin Sholder
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« on: August 08, 2013, 07:17:38 PM »
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All,

I'm in the process of setting a few default import settings based on various camera, lens, and ISO settings.  I'm in the process of reading "The Digital Negative" and finishing up the video series "Camera to Print and Screen."  On pp 66-68 there is a basic discussion on why you may or may not want to do this.  I WANT to.

Are there any somewhat step by step instructions on the methodology behind how to do this?

I've got a series of images using the X-Rite Passport Color checker and would like to know how to start this process.

This is how I would do it, is there a better method?

For at least each camera and ISO rating:

I would create my color checker profile first so that those settings can be included under the Camera Calibration > Profile section.

Would I include the lens profile corrections as well or let that go because when doing a shoot I may switch lenses and not know exactly when I used a specific lens especially if the focal lengths overlap in the case of a zoom lens?

Adjust sharpening, I've typically set this to 0 in the past.  What is a good baseline starting point for general input sharpening?  I understand each image may need a different amount, is there a good starting point for general input use?

Then adjust the Noise Reduction?  If I understand this is mostly sensor and ISO based.  Similar comments as above.

I would NOT do any Split Toning at least not as a bulk ingestion maybe after import as a develop preset.

However, would you work with the HSL values or let the Camera Calibration profile do the heavy lifting on import?

Tone curve I might do some minor tweaks such as either changing the point curve to medium contrast or just bumping each region till the test image looks great.  I would however not want to go to far here, as these are general import settings.

Then for Basic adjustments, let WB alone as well as exposure, contrast and other settings here.  However I might consider bumping the clarity and vibrance a bit for a little punch.

Then go to Develop > New Preset check each box for something that I changed, save it and I'm ready for one combination.

Is this about the right outline to do this?

I'm currently using LR5, Canon 5D Mk III with 24-105 and 70-200 zoom lenses.  I mostly shoot outdoors available light at various times of the day.  Should I also consider the time of day for each preset making additional presets possibly based on that as well?

As Jeff indicates in the book and video series, I'm trying to do the heavy lifting up front so I can better concentrate on making my image editing as smooth and efficient as possible.

Thank you for taking the time to read (and respond) to this lengthy post.

Kevin L. Sholder
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Schewe
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2013, 11:05:10 PM »
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For sure if you make your own DNG profile, setting your custom profile and then go to Develop>Set Default Settings. Note, you do NOT need to create different DNG profiles for different ISOs. Also understand, you seem to be mixing up the LR "Default" and LR Presets...they are different things designed for different tasks. A "Default" settings is camera/sensor specific but not at all scene specific.

Yes, you can have the default respect serial number (if you have to copies of the same model) and ISO specific–if that's what you really want to do. Just understand that making the LR Default dependent on ISO is a responsibility that will take a lot of work. You will need to take shots are multiple ISOs that you use and change your LR Default for each and every ISO you use. And each and every default will be toed to the serial number and ISO...if you shoot at an ISO you've not created a Default for, it will use the standard LR default.

Personally, just because you can doesn't mean you should. I don't make separate defaults for different ISOs. And since I don't have 2 copies of the same model, I don't bother t have the serial number as the default control. For a couple of cameras (my P1 IQ 180 camera back for one) I do have LR apply my custom DNG profile by default.

The rest of what you are talking about is basically something I would handle with presets...also note, I generally don't use lens corrections unless the subject needs an accurate rendering like with architectural shots. Most of my lenses don't have bad distortion problems (a couple do) and I usually end up darkening corners anyway so I don't care about vingetting.

For sharpening, that is scene and image specific although there are two built in LR presets you might look at for sharpening.

I suggest you take things in baby steps and keep things simple...yes, if you make a dG profile that is better than Adobe Standard, set up the default so it uses that profile. if you want to go down the road of making different defaults for different ISOs, try it after you've got some experience making simple Default changes. I think making some solid Presets you can use on import might be better for you that getting too complicated in making defaults...but don't worry too much–if you screw up your defaults you can always reset it back to the shipping LR "Default".
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2013, 12:13:11 AM »
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Hi,

Better to do a minimum of corrections default. Essentially, if you do some stuff on all images you may consider putting it in a default.

Myself, I have sharpening, chromatic aberration reduction, lens profile and DNG profiles in my defaults.

I would suggest checking out Adobe's DNG Profile Editor, it is free, and the profiles can be tweaked. I use Adobe Standard profile on my DSLRs but I usually have an individual calibration for my P45+. Many times I found the Adobe Standard Profile preferable.

This links point to some images planned for a coming article on my home page:

http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/Articles/MFDJourney/Color/ColorTuning/Samples/3750_Persons/

http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/Articles/MFDJourney/Color/ColorTuning/Samples/3756_flower/

http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/Articles/MFDJourney/Color/ColorTuning/Samples/3750_FULL/

File names should suggest what was used, C1 -> Capture One, CCP Color Checker Passport, DNGPE -> DNG Profile Editor, DI -> Dual Illuminant

Best regards
Erik

All,

I'm in the process of setting a few default import settings based on various camera, lens, and ISO settings.  I'm in the process of reading "The Digital Negative" and finishing up the video series "Camera to Print and Screen."  On pp 66-68 there is a basic discussion on why you may or may not want to do this.  I WANT to.

Are there any somewhat step by step instructions on the methodology behind how to do this?

I've got a series of images using the X-Rite Passport Color checker and would like to know how to start this process.

This is how I would do it, is there a better method?

For at least each camera and ISO rating:

I would create my color checker profile first so that those settings can be included under the Camera Calibration > Profile section.

Would I include the lens profile corrections as well or let that go because when doing a shoot I may switch lenses and not know exactly when I used a specific lens especially if the focal lengths overlap in the case of a zoom lens?

Adjust sharpening, I've typically set this to 0 in the past.  What is a good baseline starting point for general input sharpening?  I understand each image may need a different amount, is there a good starting point for general input use?

Then adjust the Noise Reduction?  If I understand this is mostly sensor and ISO based.  Similar comments as above.

I would NOT do any Split Toning at least not as a bulk ingestion maybe after import as a develop preset.

However, would you work with the HSL values or let the Camera Calibration profile do the heavy lifting on import?

Tone curve I might do some minor tweaks such as either changing the point curve to medium contrast or just bumping each region till the test image looks great.  I would however not want to go to far here, as these are general import settings.

Then for Basic adjustments, let WB alone as well as exposure, contrast and other settings here.  However I might consider bumping the clarity and vibrance a bit for a little punch.

Then go to Develop > New Preset check each box for something that I changed, save it and I'm ready for one combination.

Is this about the right outline to do this?

I'm currently using LR5, Canon 5D Mk III with 24-105 and 70-200 zoom lenses.  I mostly shoot outdoors available light at various times of the day.  Should I also consider the time of day for each preset making additional presets possibly based on that as well?

As Jeff indicates in the book and video series, I'm trying to do the heavy lifting up front so I can better concentrate on making my image editing as smooth and efficient as possible.

Thank you for taking the time to read (and respond) to this lengthy post.

Kevin L. Sholder
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Kevin Sholder
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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2013, 06:55:54 PM »
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Jeff, thank you for taking the time to reply.  It took me some time to digest everything.  I do seem to be confusing some of the terms, so thanks for getting me straight.

I'm glad that I don't have to create different DNG profiles for each ISO, that was going to be some work, so that load has been reduced.

And since I only own 1 copy of the 5D, the serial number / ISO is not going to be required either.

In this paragraph "The rest of what you are talking about is basically something I would handle with presets...also note, I generally don't use lens corrections unless the subject needs an accurate rendering like with architectural shots. Most of my lenses don't have bad distortion problems (a couple do) and I usually end up darkening corners anyway so I don't care about vingetting." you are referring to my confusion of defaults and presets.  So the presets would be where all the other stuff goes and is not typically done on import, simply apply a preset after import and then sync the settings, is my understanding correct here?

I agree that the baby steps will be good now.  I've been creating way to many camera profiles for almost every shooting situation when what you are telling me I don't have to do (but once), so that in it self will clean things up and simplify everything as well.

So thanks for making it simpler that I was, life is good!!

Thanks for the great books!!

Kevin
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Kevin Sholder
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2013, 07:22:18 PM »
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Erik,

Thank you so much for sharing the images, they are most helpful.  I downloaded and tried Adobe's DNG Profiler since I had only every used the CCP software in the past.  I was surprised to see the difference between the two products and what they effect, as they are different in some of the color squares on the CCP, there was (what I consider) a big difference.

You have some examples using the Adobe Standard dual illuminant (sunlight / incandescent), is that from using both color tables when the profile is created?  And how is that different from the Adofbe DNG Profiler dual illuminant (daylight, incandescent)

I look forward to the completed article, as the comparison is great to see.

I do like the Adobe DNG Profile Editor's default better than the CCP default on my test images so far, and they can be adjusted (NOT GOING THERE YET), so that's a bonus for the fine tuning aspect as well.

Again thank you for taking the time to read my post and reply!!

Kevin
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Schewe
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« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2013, 12:04:40 AM »
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I agree that the baby steps will be good now.  I've been creating way to many camera profiles for almost every shooting situation when what you are telling me I don't have to do (but once), so that in it self will clean things up and simplify everything as well.

I think X-Rite has oversold the notion of spawning ff multiple DNG profiles for every lighting situation. You need to make either a dual-illuminate profile or a profile for daylight & tungsten for sure (I suggest a dual-illuminate profile). The only other profile you might need is if you are shooting under odd or unusual light sources such as fluorescent, sodium vapor or LED lights. A daylight/tungsten dual profile will take care of pretty much anything other than lights that output non-continious spectral power distributions...
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