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Author Topic: Velvia vs Provia  (Read 3351 times)
artobest
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« Reply #20 on: August 15, 2013, 09:37:03 AM »
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Another vote for Portra - the best colour film, especially now, in the age of post-processing. Great latitude and tremendously nuanced colour. Try overexposing by two stops in woodland shade. You'll get the best greens ever, IMO.
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bcooter
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« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2013, 02:01:16 PM »
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Cooter, I'm sold- I'm getting myself one of these Fuji S2, just for the heck of it
Smiley

Once again, it's a ccd and yea I  know somebody will say there is no difference, but I always see a difference.

This is EPR the next is the Fuji S2.




Actually the S2 image required virtually no post production, the EPR image a little more.

The cool thing about the S2 is it's cheap.  A DX lens and a camera strap, a microdrive and your good to go for less than a small point and shoot.

Also unlike today's cameras it takes like two minutes to learn the menu of an S2.   

But it's slow, cheap build (but tough) small lcd and like film, it is what it is.

IMO

BC
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Mr. Rib
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« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2013, 06:17:37 PM »
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I love the colors. They are chunky, rich, definitely film-like. I can recall numerous discussions here over the last few years about very subjective matter, film capture aesthetics- this organic feel, something elusive and gauzy about it that's not yet being seized by digital imagery (in my opinion). Maybe it's a magic mix of imperfection of some sort, with grain and characteristics of particular film / slide material.. I still think these film capture merits haven't been achieved with digital capture and yes, everybody can argue about it all day and all night. My point is that Fuji S2 images kind of recall me of these merits, thanks for sharing Cooter. I wouldn't be expecting that stuff out of this plastic camera, I always learn new stuff here Smiley

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Rob C
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« Reply #23 on: August 16, 2013, 03:23:01 AM »
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What's with the colours, BC?

The digi one looks like you shot through a piece of yellow light-filter gel. I never got that with film unless by using the wrong type at the right time.

My God! Perhaps it's not your pic at all but my monitor, just as I approach the end of a weeks-long re-jigging of all the shots on my website. Please tell me it's not true! I coudn't face it all again! I wouldn't: I'd take my own advice and do a Route 66 through Europe instead.

Should you ever need another job, think sales: you've already shifted a few cameras without even having a job with the company!

;-)

Best regards -

Rob C
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sam@
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« Reply #24 on: August 16, 2013, 06:57:34 AM »
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I also loved EPR / EPN (6x7) and Kodachrome - Kodachromes from many years ago still look incredible.
I used quite a lot of Kodak E100G and E100VS but didn't bond with Velvia.

As was suggested earlier Jo, wouldn't you just test the films before you go?

Sam
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Craig Magee
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« Reply #25 on: August 16, 2013, 07:27:30 AM »
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I've always liked Provia 100F, I like that colder look. It doesn't have the same color separation that Velvia has but it can be made to look as saturated/contrasty.

I'd say Velvia 100 is the worst thing to be using for a holiday. Always found the colors to blocky and its reds are insane. Only ever used it for sunsets for that intense red light look. I'd usually use V50 or V100F.

Most of what I've shot though over the last few years has been on Portra 160/400. Both great films with lovely colors and fine grain. The 13-14stop latitude of the 400 is amazing. Only problem I find with it, is the deep shadows going a little cyan/green which can be a nightmare to fix if you want to fix it.

Extar 100 has color reproduction similar to V50, good saturation and separation. But sometimes the colors can look a little funky for me, so I just stuck to Portra.
Grain is really fine. Issue with cyan casts again though in the deep shadows.

I only ever shot like 2-3 rolls of 400x on 35mm when it first came out. It was good, especially when pushed to 1600, much better than 400F. But then I just moved to Portra 400 as it was easier for me to get processed at the time.

  
« Last Edit: August 16, 2013, 07:37:10 AM by craigosh » Logged
Rob C
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« Reply #26 on: August 16, 2013, 03:03:19 PM »
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I also loved EPR / EPN (6x7) and Kodachrome - Kodachromes from many years ago still look incredible.
I used quite a lot of Kodak E100G and E100VS but didn't bond with Velvia.

As was suggested earlier Jo, wouldn't you just test the films before you go?

Sam


No question about it. All of my opening gallery is Kodachrome (except for a couple of square Ektachromes copied on a digi camera), scanned on an inexpensive CanoScan FS 4000 US. It represented my first digital experience, way before I bought a digi camera. In a sense, maybe it was my best digital experience - maybe not. Maybe that's yet to come, or so my natural optimism pushes me to remark. ;-)

Ironic, wouldn't it be, if after all those learning curves, nothing happens next.

Rob C
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Gandalf
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« Reply #27 on: August 18, 2013, 02:06:18 PM »
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Provia exposed at 160 and pushed one stop in developing is a great look. It is easy to scan like Provia and keeps reasonable skin tones, but adds a lot of saturation and contrast. Velvia to me to me is a unique and wonderful look that I have never been able to duplicate with digital. Sometimes I think I did, but when I compare against the chromes, it's only an approximation. E100G is a very nice, all purpose film.

I would highly recommend shooting a few test rolls before you leave and have them developed at the lab you are planning to use, just so there are no surprises. For example, I remember that E100VS renders orange and red as the same color. Many Fuji films do the same with certain blues and purples. Greyish yellows lose definition with E100GX. While some of those may be deal breakers in one location, it may be fine in another. For example shooting something red against orange with E100VS doesn't work, but take the film to Moab or Sedona and it comes to life.

You also need to consider the final version of the image and how it will get there. Velvia looks amazing on a light table, but can be tough to scan and print with dynamic range, however if it will be drum scanned it doesn't matter. I have not yet tried camera scans, but I'm curious about trying it. Provia looks boring on a light table, but it scans predictably, as does E100G.

If it were me, I would probably take a handful of Velvia, a handful of E100G and some Provia 400F or a 400 speed negative film. The reason I am not recommending Provia pushed is that when I started using it, the local labs only charged an extra dollar to push and now they charge double to push.

Honestly, I think you are going to wish you had brought the Phase, though there is something pure and organic with film.
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urbanpicasso
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« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2013, 06:26:36 AM »
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here is a bit of a comparison.  Velvia 100 and Provia 100 4x5 58xl f16 canyonlands... as you can see, the provia gives you a little more dynamic range and the color is ( in my eyes ) truer to life.
db
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