Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 »   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Compositionally Challanged  (Read 25352 times)
wmchauncey
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 433


« on: August 15, 2013, 09:14:53 AM »
ReplyReply

I am quite proficient at the technical aspects of photography...am rather eclectic as opposed to having a specific style of work and am a fan of Scott Kelby in this  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpHMuK7Htic
Compositionally challenged is an understatement...to the point that most of my WA work is limited to using a 180 macro or a 300 f/2.8 lens, used due to their superior resolution.
I then take numerous images and photo-merge them to select a tolerable image by composing/cropping, general image improvement  within Photoshop.  This method seems to work for me.

SOOC holds no interest for me but, I do feel as though something is lacking in my workflow.  Comments do hold an interest to me...thanks.
Logged

The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
stamper
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2653


« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2013, 09:56:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Being a fan of Scott Kelby is - imo - a drawback and I am sure there are better photographers out there? This is of course subjective but Kelby to my mind is a PS "expert" and less so a photographer. As to your choice of lenses then you are needing to expand the range. Any "superior resolution" will possibly be lost by what you are doing? A possible rethink of your methods as to a more "normal" way of doing things will help. 
Logged

wmchauncey
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 433


« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2013, 10:29:00 AM »
ReplyReply

My mentioning Scott Kelby was only referencing that video and it's explanation on "working a scene".
I have, being a gear head, have most of the "normal" lenses, just don't use them.  Would like to be able to "compose using the viewfinder".
Logged

The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
stamper
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2653


« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2013, 02:46:36 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote

am rather eclectic as opposed to having a specific style of work and am a fan of Scott Kelby

unquote

You did infer you are a fan? You also gave the impression that you only had and used two different lenses. I was replying to those pieces of information provided by yourself. Now what is the real thrust of your post? Smiley
Logged

wmchauncey
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 433


« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2013, 07:41:39 AM »
ReplyReply

My method of "over-shooting" an image by taking numerous images with the intent of merging to crop/compose on my computer
because I can't seem to compose in my viewfinder...I've been told that it denotes a lack of composition skill and is wrong.  Is it so wrong?
Logged

The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
stamper
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2653


« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2013, 09:06:29 AM »
ReplyReply

It certainly isn't the best method. Smiley How long have you been shooting?
Logged

wmchauncey
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 433


« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2013, 09:48:29 AM »
ReplyReply

Started 'bout ten years ago...serious for the last five years or so.
Logged

The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
Slobodan Blagojevic
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5793


When everybody thinks the same... nobody thinks.


WWW
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2013, 10:20:49 AM »
ReplyReply

Care to post an example?
Logged

Slobodan

Flickr
500px
wmchauncey
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 433


« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2013, 10:25:06 AM »
ReplyReply

Sure...I use about 20 images to end up with this one


.
Logged

The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
Slobodan Blagojevic
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5793


When everybody thinks the same... nobody thinks.


WWW
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2013, 10:37:27 AM »
ReplyReply

Actually, your approach is not so unusual, it is what GigaPan photographers all the time, at least in terms of combinig multiple images. Though the reason they do it usually has very little to do with composition, but mostly to satisfy the quest for extreme detail and/or large printouts.

In your case, the question is how you know how to crop in post processing stage, but not in viewfinder? I would say some sort of compositional sense in necessary in both cases.
Logged

Slobodan

Flickr
500px
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2781


« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2013, 12:37:02 PM »
ReplyReply

Compositionally challenged is an understatement... I then take numerous images and photo-merge them to select a tolerable image by composing/cropping, general image improvement  within Photoshop.

For some reason, I took what you wrote about "A delicate capture" to mean you'd hand-held and then focus-stacked; and that (possible misunderstanding) was enough encouragement for me to rely on taking numerous hand-held images with the intention of a later merge, during a recent week in Yosemite NP.

Rather than "compositionally challenged" the experience seemed compositionally enriched -- if the subject doesn't fit in the frame then take those extra images and break-out of the frame; if 1:1 or 16:9 or ... seem more suitable to the subject then take those extra images and reshape the frame.
Logged
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2781


« Reply #11 on: August 17, 2013, 02:34:31 PM »
ReplyReply

Sure...I use about 20 images to end up with this one

One of the difficulties I find with blending that many images is maintaining consistent color. Currently I'm trying to merge photos taken along the Big Sur coastline and hills; which combine coastal fog, bright ocean reflections, oak chaparral, bright rock and forest shade. On merge, the fog bank turns purple and the ocean reflections cyan -- not pretty :-)
Logged
wmchauncey
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 433


« Reply #12 on: August 17, 2013, 02:59:29 PM »
ReplyReply

Isaac...your dilemma is most likely caused by different lighting in the various images which must be balanced in LR before the merge process...that my friend is a chore.
Pick one image and balance all the rest to that image...you will need to alter your color temperature as well as play with your HSL sliders.
Don't neglect your adjustment brush with/without the auto mask feature and...that little color box thingy that is usually ignored, it works great sometimes.
Count on this taking many hours...is that image worth it?

Additionally...Photoshop has numerous "merge options", be aware that they will cough out different "looking" images and...using the same option anew may change your outcome.

In the future...take those multiple images as quickly as possible to avoid lighting shifts.  Lotsa luck my friend!
Logged

The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
iluvmycam
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 322


WWW
« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2013, 03:29:23 PM »
ReplyReply

I am quite proficient at the technical aspects of photography...am rather eclectic as opposed to having a specific style of work and am a fan of Scott Kelby in this  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FpHMuK7Htic
Compositionally challenged is an understatement...to the point that most of my WA work is limited to using a 180 macro or a 300 f/2.8 lens, used due to their superior resolution.
I then take numerous images and photo-merge them to select a tolerable image by composing/cropping, general image improvement  within Photoshop.  This method seems to work for me.

SOOC holds no interest for me but, I do feel as though something is lacking in my workflow.  Comments do hold an interest to me...thanks.

What is your question? You can't compose?

If so, study some art books. If your photos are boring, find more interesting subjects.
Logged
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2781


« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2013, 03:47:48 PM »
ReplyReply

different lighting in the various images

I think that might also be a problem with the example you posted ;-)
Logged
stamper
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2653


« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2013, 03:54:28 AM »
ReplyReply

Regarding shifting light then manually expose. or expose in aperture priority with exposure lock for a value half way between the lightest part and darkest part of interest in the scene and shoot all of the parts at the same exposure. That way when you join the files together they have the same exposure. If the light and dark parts don't exceed 6 stops then in LR/ACR you can balance out the extremes of light and darks. Some people allow their exposure to change when they shoot different parts of the scene . A mistake. Sad
Logged

wmchauncey
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 433


« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2013, 05:45:11 AM »
ReplyReply

Quote
I think that might also be a problem with the example you posted
In that particular set of images it was a 60 second time frame, but it was in Auto mode,
Very unwise choice as Stamper pointed out.



























Logged

The things you do for yourself die with you, the things you do for others live forever.
A man's worth should be judged, not when he basks in the sun, but how he faces the storm.

My stuff...http://1x.com/member/chauncey43
Isaac
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2781


« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2013, 01:40:05 PM »
ReplyReply

Regarding shifting light then manually expose...

I do.

The solution was to brush appropriate WB and exposure and highlight reduction and contrast reduction, across the coastal fog bank and ocean reflection in 2 of the images. Bringing those diagonal halves into harmony with the chaparral and woodland allowed exposure blending without creating off-colors.

Also, if I'm going to make focus-stacked panos without automation then I really must practice systematically covering the scene until I can do it on automatic :-)
« Last Edit: August 18, 2013, 02:10:11 PM by Isaac » Logged
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12213


« Reply #18 on: August 20, 2013, 02:45:23 AM »
ReplyReply

I do.


Good grief, Isaac, never, ever say those two little words unless you really, really mean them! And writing them is even more dangerous.

Whew!

Rob C
Logged

graeme
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 286


« Reply #19 on: August 20, 2013, 03:26:42 AM »
ReplyReply

My method of "over-shooting" an image by taking numerous images with the intent of merging to crop/compose on my computer
because I can't seem to compose in my viewfinder...I've been told that it denotes a lack of composition skill and is wrong.  Is it so wrong?

No, not if you're happy with your results.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 »   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad