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Author Topic: Suggestions for Landscape Mirrorless Equipment  (Read 10217 times)
LK23
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« on: August 19, 2013, 05:26:10 PM »
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I recently sold my Canon EOS 5D Mark II and all lenses.  I was finding I wasn't using this system because the camera and lens were too heavy to lug around.  I shoot landscape photography primarily.  I am considering purchasing a mirrorless camera and currently have my sights on the Sony NEX 7.  I would appreciate your thoughts on this camera and others, as well as the best group of lens for landscape photography.

Additionally, I retained my Gitzo tripod.  Any suggestions on ball heads and quick release plates for the mirrorless camera?

Thanks,

Rex

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Dahlmann
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« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2013, 06:23:00 PM »
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I did the same.
Sold nearly all my Canon gear.

I bought Fuji x-pro1 and Fujinon XF 14mm
That combo is light,easy to use and the combo is sharper than my 5d2 with canon TSE 24mm II .


And i'm a landscape photographer.
I went from 12kg gear and a big backpack to 1.5kg gear and I kept the IQ..

Sorry for bad English



Cheers Daniel

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Michael N. Meyer
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2013, 03:25:26 PM »
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In the studio, on a tripod, with adapted lenses, I'm quite happy with my NEX-7. As a handheld camera with native lenses (35mm f1.8 OSS) I've not gotten on well with it. I also am not fond of how it renders once light levels start to drop and ISO starts to get above ISO400. I can't quantify this, but the images just look off.

My X-Pro1 I use for portraits and event work and find it handles nicely with consistently good image quality throughout the ISO range.

A friend of mine has an OM-D, which he loves, but I find it too small to hold comfortably.

Just the other day I did a quick and dirty comparison of my three primary cameras (a850, Nex-7 & X-Pro1) with each of their normal lenses (50mm f1.4 Minolta, 35mm f1.8 OSS & 35mm f1.4 respectively). I shot a small still life set-up lit with daylight with each camera on a tripod and set to base ISO. At middle apertures there is little to choose between them in terms of image quality. Wide-open the lenses have clear quality differences.

The point being: IMO instead of image quality, how a camera handles, for you, should be considered most strongly. You might want to play with the cameras in the store rather than buying blind if you can.
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The Ute
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2013, 03:51:20 PM »
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Get yourself a Sigma DP1 or DP2 Merrill.

Both can be had for around $1500.00 ($750 each).

You will not a find a camera that has better image quality when used within their operating windows.

The DP's will easily out resolve anything out there except for a D800 or a MF.

The image of quality of the DP2 in particular is stunning.

The only caution is they are not good low light cameras.

Really do not want to use them above ISO 800.

Read Michael Reichmann's  reviews of them.

I absolutely love mine.



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fike
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« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2013, 01:22:08 PM »
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There are lots of great choices in these compact system cameras.  I am personally a proponent of Micro Four Thirds.  the Olympus OM-D E-M5 has matched any other compact camera out there but it has a much wider selection of high-quality native lenses--when I say native, I mean lenses that don't need adapters and that RETAIN AUTO FOCUS. I don't like working with manual focus because my vision isn't excellent.

In the Olympus environment, the best lenses for landscape are probably their set of excellent primes:
Oly 12mm f/2
Oly 17mm f/1.8
Pan 25 f/1.4
Oly 45 f/1.8
Oly 75 f/1.8

The quality of this set of lenses compares favorably of any other system of lenses.

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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
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AFairley
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« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2013, 03:36:05 PM »
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There are lots of great choices in these compact system cameras.  I am personally a proponent of Micro Four Thirds.  the Olympus OM-D E-M5 has matched any other compact camera out there but it has a much wider selection of high-quality native lenses--when I say native, I mean lenses that don't need adapters and that RETAIN AUTO FOCUS. I don't like working with manual focus because my vision isn't excellent.

In the Olympus environment, the best lenses for landscape are probably their set of excellent primes:
Oly 12mm f/2
Oly 17mm f/1.8
Pan 25 f/1.4
Oly 45 f/1.8
Oly 75 f/1.8

The quality of this set of lenses compares favorably of any other system of lenses.



If you are willing to stitch, what you get from the Oly 45 should be spectacular.  Unfortunately, the two wides are not as impressive as I understand it because of corner softness, which I would not particularly want in a landscape lens.
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Mjollnir
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« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2013, 07:57:12 PM »
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If you are willing to stitch, what you get from the Oly 45 should be spectacular.  Unfortunately, the two wides are not as impressive as I understand it because of corner softness, which I would not particularly want in a landscape lens.

I haven't found that to be the case with the 12mm whatsoever.

Stop it down to, say, 4 or 5.6, and it's as sharp as any WA I've ever used.
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Peter Stacey
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« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2013, 10:41:42 PM »
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I'll echo the first reply. I kept all of my heavier equipment and still use it, but purchased an X-Pro 1 when it first came out.

With the upgrades to the firmware and quality of the lenses, I use it more now than my Nikon cameras and for landscape work I have A1 size prints hanging on my walls that look fine.
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JayWPage
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« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2013, 11:38:47 PM »
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You might consider one of the Sigma DP Merrill cameras which come in 3 different versions (focal lengths). When the conditions are right it's hard to beat the resolution from these compact, Foveon sensor equipped cameras.
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stever
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« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2013, 11:25:13 PM »
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although i'm not giving up my Canon FF system (high ISO, action AF, etc) I've actively followed mirrorless system development for some time (and bought, tested, and returned a couple cameras) as there are lots of times when a lighter, less obtrusive camera is highly desirable (in addition to the air travel with big camera and lenses hassle).  But I haven't found anything yet that satisfies my requirements - which are broader than landscape.

micro 4/3 are pretty marginal for big prints, but the lenses are much more compact and lighter than APSC and generally better quality -from the significantly smaller image circle - which is a problem for me as I really prefer the 3/2 format in general and particularly for landscape and stitching.  that said, the Pany GX-7 seems to have all the bases covered.

i'm so impressed with the functionality and IQ of my Sony RX 100 that i'm eagerly awaiting the new RX7 and RX9.  The issue is that these compact cameras have - and will have - lenses (at least the good ones) that aren't a lot different in size and weight than DSLR lenses.  If Sony get's the RX 9 right I could be persuaded to spend real money making it my wide-normal system.

For landscape only - assuming reasonable light and/or tripod the Sigma DP Merrills look hard to beat - Lloyd Chambers - diglloyd.com - has done a fair amount of comparison to the Nikon D800E - you just have to put up with the limitations and workflow (which is not for me). and do the available focal lengths suit your style

the other camera deserving mention is the Ricoh GH - not as sharp as the Sigma, but none of the quirky limitations - if 28mm suits your style - hopefully they will offer a couple more focal lengths.





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kencameron
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« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2013, 01:11:25 AM »
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i'm so impressed with the functionality and IQ of my Sony RX 100 that i'm eagerly awaiting the new RX7 and RX9

I would much appreciate a link to information about these. I haven't been able to find anything about a sony rx7 (only the panasonic) or rx9. Like you, I am a big fan of the rx100.
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stever
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« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2013, 03:00:58 PM »
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sonyalpharumors.com and mirrorlessrumors - looks like the announcement will be end of Sept
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PeterAit
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« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2013, 03:35:51 PM »
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I cannot say enough good things about the Panasonic G3 system. True, I have not compared it against any of the other mirrorless systems, but  ...  I am a photographer, not an equipment reviewer.

You get 16 megapixels in a light and well-designed body. You get the option of using the eye-level viewfinder (electronic, of course) or an articulated LCD screen. The lenses are great, I believe the optics come from Leica. The focal length factor is 2x. I typically carry the 7-14, the 14-42, the 45-200, and the 100-300. I also have an optically stunning Olympus macro that I use with an adapter. So, I have full-frame equivalent of 14 to 600 mm, the longer lenses are VR, and the entire package fits in a modest-sized backpack and does not kill my weary old back. When I was trekking through jungles in Nicaragua last year, I managed to carry all this without a problem.

You can check out my website if you like (URL below). The Nicaragua portfolio photos were all taken with the G3 and the Alaska ones with the G2, the 10 MP predecessor.
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Peter
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« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2013, 03:52:42 PM »
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I think based on this thread I know why mirrorless system cameras are doing so poorly in the market.

Arguably there are four (maybe five depending on who you count) serious players in the mirrorless system market: Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, and Fuji are probably the big four. 

Of course Canon and Nikon have sewn up the top 3/4ths of the "not-a-compact-camera" market. This leaves these four other manufacturers to a fragmented fight for the Canikon's droppings--that last quarter of the "not-a-compact-camera" market.  The fighting is cannibalizing all the players.  Panasonic and Olympus only survive because they are using the same system.  Sony survives because they have great distribution channels. Fuji is a cool niche player.  With all four fighting over the droppings behind Canikon, is is likely to remain a fragmented space without any real leaders. 

The only question is who bows out first.  My bet would be on Panasonic based on market share, but they have a massive corporate sponsor in Panasonic.  Sony has the same thing going for it.  Who drops first?
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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
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Herbc
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« Reply #14 on: September 21, 2013, 11:21:21 AM »
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I seem to remember sales volumes for Canon and Nikon's full size offerings dropping off, but can't remember the source-might have been Lloyd Chamber's blog.

I came from LF, got a D800E, still use it only on a tripod.  I don't think mirrorless will do everything it will do, but for less than deadly serious work, the Sony NEX 7 or the Oly OmD-5 are pretty close, and a lot easier to carry around.  I just got the sony, and have yet to find a weak spot.  I understand they are coming out with some new stuff in a month or so, so I would wait and see what happens to their prices.
If you really want good data, DxO is VERY accurate in their testing of cameras and lenses
for example, they give the Sony RX1R a higher rating than the Leica M9.
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shadowblade
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« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2013, 04:17:01 PM »
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Wait for the Sony mirrorless full-frame camera. It's almost no longer a rumour, with an October announcement likely.

Using an adapter, you'd be able to fit any lens you want to that.
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peter
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« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2013, 08:54:39 PM »
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Get a Sigma DP2 Merril and be done with it! I have 4x5s, 6x7s and a d800e kit, but what I grab 95% of the time is my dp2. Simplify your vision! Sharpness of the dp2 is CRAZY, corner to corner. Only lens that matches that performance in my d800e kit is my manual Samyang 35mm (OMG a killer lens!!). 20" x 30" prints basically same sharpness as the d800e (except to the pixel peeping crowd - that has never actually sold a print! Cheesy). Sigma DP2 + cheap lens hood + 2 lb tripod and your good to go.
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fike
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« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2013, 10:41:28 PM »
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Wait for the Sony mirrorless full-frame camera. It's almost no longer a rumour, with an October announcement likely.

Using an adapter, you'd be able to fit any lens you want to that.

...and the lenses to cover that full frame sensor will be big again and the fact that you have a little body won't matter any more.    All the compact full frame cameras have had very 'normal' range fixed lenses. There is a reason for that.  Big sensors = big lenses.  compact full frame continues to be a niche that I suspect will always be limited either with large lenses or very narrow range of fixed focal length lenses. 
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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
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shadowblade
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« Reply #18 on: September 21, 2013, 11:45:05 PM »
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...and the lenses to cover that full frame sensor will be big again and the fact that you have a little body won't matter any more.    All the compact full frame cameras have had very 'normal' range fixed lenses. There is a reason for that.  Big sensors = big lenses.  compact full frame continues to be a niche that I suspect will always be limited either with large lenses or very narrow range of fixed focal length lenses. 

Not necessarily.

Sony body plus Leica M lenses with an adapter may be a good combination.
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #19 on: September 21, 2013, 11:49:59 PM »
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...and the lenses to cover that full frame sensor will be big again and the fact that you have a little body won't matter any more.    All the compact full frame cameras have had very 'normal' range fixed lenses. There is a reason for that.  Big sensors = big lenses.  compact full frame continues to be a niche that I suspect will always be limited either with large lenses or very narrow range of fixed focal length lenses. 
unless the sony has in body stabilization.  Probably only help if Sony makes lenses specifically for the full frame NEX, and not design it simply to use sony A lenses.
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