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Poll
Question: Is mirror lockup something you routine use?
Always and for all shots - 21 (25.6%)
Long exposure and macros with tripod - 26 (31.7%)
Once in a while - 22 (26.8%)
Never - 5 (6.1%)
Other (explain) - 8 (9.8%)
Total Voters: 82

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Author Topic: Do you use mirror lockup?  (Read 10560 times)
Bob_B
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« on: August 22, 2013, 08:36:10 AM »
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I've been debating about mirror lockup for some time now. I understand its benefits to reduce vibrations, but is it worth the extra trouble?
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Hans van Driest
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« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2013, 09:01:29 AM »
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no need with a Sony a99.
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Isaac
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« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2013, 09:29:17 AM »
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no need with a Sony a99.

Do you deactive the Steady Shot function? ;-)
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jrsforums
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« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2013, 09:54:55 AM »
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LiveView on Canon has, by default, the mirror locked up.

Would help if you indicated what camera you were using.
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John
Bob_B
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« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2013, 09:56:40 AM »
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I'm using a Canon 7D. (OP)
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jrsforums
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« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2013, 09:59:52 AM »
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I'm using a Canon 7D. (OP)

OK....use LiveView
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John
MarkL
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« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2013, 12:11:54 PM »
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If the camera is on a tripod? Always, I can't really think of any reason not to
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2013, 12:38:24 PM »
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If the camera is on a tripod? Always, I can't really think of any reason not to
+1.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2013, 03:23:44 PM »
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+1

But, I also use self timer or cable release.

Best regards
Erik


If the camera is on a tripod? Always, I can't really think of any reason not to
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Philip Weber
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« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2013, 08:38:24 PM »
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If I'm shooting locked down on a tripod, I always use mirror lock-up, in conjunction with a cable release (Nikon D800). Why wouldn't one?

Phil
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Peter Stacey
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« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2013, 09:15:31 PM »
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If the camera is on a tripod? Always, I can't really think of any reason not to
+1.

+1 more
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Eric Brody
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« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2013, 09:27:19 PM »
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I guess it depends on what you call "the extra trouble." If the camera is on a tripod, has been carefully focused eg with live view, AND you care about the results, how can it NOT be worth it. I do not know about the Canon system, but in the world of Nikon, it's quite easy, a simple turn of the dial sets it. Attach the cable, push once, mirror up, wait however long you feel is necessary, push it again and the shutter is released, seems pretty simple.
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Fine_Art
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« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2013, 09:36:49 PM »
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I always use it for static subjects. Of course MLU tracking wildlife is nuts so the poll options could use adjustment.
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Peter Stacey
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« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2013, 09:42:55 PM »
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I always use it for static subjects. Of course MLU tracking wildlife is nuts so the poll options could use adjustment.

For me, less about the subject being static and more about the camera being static. Whenever the camera is static, then I use MLU.
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Eric Myrvaagnes
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« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2013, 10:20:32 PM »
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I guess it depends on what you call "the extra trouble." If the camera is on a tripod, has been carefully focused eg with live view, AND you care about the results, how can it NOT be worth it. I do not know about the Canon system, but in the world of Nikon, it's quite easy, a simple turn of the dial sets it. Attach the cable, push once, mirror up, wait however long you feel is necessary, push it again and the shutter is released, seems pretty simple.
Even with a Canon system "the extra trouble" of going back to reshoot the scene because the image was blurry is likely to be greater than "the extra trouble" of using MLU and a cable or self-timer (on a tripod, of course).
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2013, 04:14:35 AM »
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If the camera is on a tripod? Always, I can't really think of any reason not to

Yep, indeed.

It is in fact mandatory. Some cameras would in fact probably end up being less sharp on a tripod without mirror lock up than handheld at reasonably fast shutter speeds.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Tony Jay
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« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2013, 04:55:23 AM »
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When on a tripod - use Live view.
And use a remote.
Absolute no-brainer!

Is it worth it? Yes! With bells on.

Nuff said.

Tony Jay
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Jason DiMichele
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« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2013, 09:28:55 AM »
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+1

Cheers!

When on a tripod - use Live view.
And use a remote.
Absolute no-brainer!

Is it worth it? Yes! With bells on.

Nuff said.

Tony Jay
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Jason DiMichele
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Misirlou
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« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2013, 10:25:26 AM »
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Canons have two different self-timer settings, a long one and a short one. I use the long when I want to compose a picture and then jump into it myself (mostly travel shots with my wife). I believe that one is about a 10 second delay.

I use the short one, 2 seconds or so I think, for tripod shots in conjunction with mirror lockup. It's really the easiest thing you can do to improve sharpness. No need to carry a cable release either: press the shutter, mirror comes up, shutter opens 2 seconds later. Also works with live view.

The easiest thing to do is set one of the custom shooting modes to activate both mirror lockup and short timer. I'm pretty sure all mid range and high end Canon DSLRs can do that, and probably most others as well. On my camera, I often use C1 for HDR. The key settings are mirror lockup, manual exposure, short timer.
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nma
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« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2013, 12:17:05 PM »
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There seems to be some little bit of confusion about live view (LV) vs mirror lock up (MLU) on Canon SLR's. On many Canon SLR's is accessed via the menu system. Once it is engaged, the view finder is blocked by the mirror in the up position. With LV, the mirror is up but the image can be viewed on screen. Moreover, one can inspect the RGB histogram in real-time as you vary the composition or, for example, zoom your lens. Most importantly for landscape work on a tripod or other rigid support, you can examine the image at 5x or 10x zoom, with 10x corresponding to the pixel level. This feature makes focusing fool proof. If it looks like it is in focus on the screen at 10x, it is. You are not looking through the optical view finder and hoping that the camera focus system and focus on the sensor coincide.  There are also options that further reduce vibration, but I forget what they are called. Maybe someone will comment.

All in all LV is a very important feature for landscape photographers. Oh! Did I mention that you invoke it by pushing a button on the back of the camera. The esteemed Michael R used to beg for an MLU button; this is much better.
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