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Author Topic: Develop Sequence and how to Set Contrast Before Whites and Blacks  (Read 6790 times)
Peter Stacey
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« Reply #20 on: September 03, 2013, 05:53:09 PM »
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You can also use auto tone in parts.  For example, shift-double-click on Exposure just for auto exposure, but leave the other Basic controls as they are (and then fine-tune manually).

Thanks for the tip Eric, I didn't know that one.
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luxborealis
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« Reply #21 on: September 03, 2013, 08:18:12 PM »
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You can also use auto tone in parts.  For example, shift-double-click on Exposure just for auto exposure, but leave the other Basic controls as they are (and then fine-tune manually).

Brilliant - thanks MadMan!
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Terry McDonald
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« Reply #22 on: September 04, 2013, 09:05:44 AM »
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Bottom line if the scene is low contrast, start by increasing contrast...if the scene is high contrast, start by lowering...then adjust the rest of the sliders to taste. Or, ignore the basic panel and simply use the curve editor :~)

Jeff, curious why you would automatically want to increase contrast in a low contrast scene or reduce it in a high contrast scene.  If the scene is low contrast by nature, for example over a lake or a foggy wooded area, why would you automatically want to increase the contrast in that scene?  I understand your point about adjusting contrast before the other options but not as an absolute.
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Isaac
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« Reply #23 on: September 04, 2013, 10:32:37 AM »
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... why you would automatically want to increase contrast in a low contrast scene or reduce it in a high contrast scene.

gruhl28's question was "assuming a photo where you want a full range from dark to light".
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gruhl28
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« Reply #24 on: September 04, 2013, 04:21:25 PM »
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gruhl28's question was "assuming a photo where you want a full range from dark to light".
Thanks for reading my question carefully.  Smiley
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stamper
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« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2013, 03:20:04 AM »
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Thanks for reading my question carefully.  Smiley

Ah....but did he understand it?
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