Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Starting my own photography business..advice please!  (Read 622 times)
GeekMark
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« on: August 30, 2013, 09:19:58 AM »
ReplyReply

Hey guys! Am looking for some help as I am starting my own business eeek  Smiley So, some info if you're interested..I've been taking photos for about 4 years now, and got into editing about 2 years ago. My friends have encouraged me to start my own photography business as they think I've got what it takes. Thing is, I might have what it takes but I've researched the competition and it's tough. So, I've been looking to see how I can get more people to view my site. I've found that Facebook and Twitter are good ways to get more traffic..anyone who owns a business use those? I also came across http://www.icontact.com/features/social-media-marketing/facebook-publishing but not really heard anything about it. But really, I'd love to know if anyone here uses Facebook or Twitter to promote their business maybe? Or if you know other ways to do it, please let me know! I am new to this but you know, since I  got involved and invested a lot of time and money too, I really want to make it a success! And advice is welcome, thanks Smiley
Logged
Rocco Penny
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 483



« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2013, 09:39:32 AM »
ReplyReply

Establish a mixed stream of income.  If there are serious lulls in the bustling environment you describe, other sources of income will be what will save your hide...
What if your business experiences say a 40% below average season based on calender months?
Then along comes tax season, no one wants to spend $, your 40% is still on the books, and now you are running playing catch up.
For me, there was a point where my dreams of income matched my need, but then what about through a slow time?
So varied income sources have helped me continue my pursuit of photography.
Logged
GeekMark
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2013, 10:46:23 AM »
ReplyReply

Thanks for the advice, appreciate it. I've never considered it but it's something I'll think about now. I guess it's better to be safe than sorry.
Logged
Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12215


« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2013, 11:24:41 AM »
ReplyReply

FWIW - I think your motivation for success is of the wrong kind.

To have a chance, it should already be an obsession, something you just can't stop getting yourself involved with, despite all the advice, good, bad or simply misplaced. It also helps your chances if you are young, single and might enjoy living in a squat for a while.

I think a lot of the arts are similar; consider the Rolling Stones: the two top guns did just that, without hot water and even an idea of getting rich or successful - they say - it was the lure of the blues. Period. Read Keef's book, Life. He could just as easily be writing about photography.

Negative advice? Maybe, but also realistic unless you are already loaded to the point that you can support yourself (hence the appeal of singularity) for a minumum of six months with nothing coming in. I got into this racket for myself after six years of working for other people and learning a tiny bit about how such businesses work. So, I had my six month's-worth of capětal, but even then, before it got better I ended up in the red, not because I didn't find work, but because ad. agencies used to stipulate three months after month of invoice as pay-day... banker to the rich, I was. And that was when work wasn't that tough to find. If you can survive that first period, it encourages and toughens you up, both qualities becoming essential as the clientele goes higher up the scale.

Depending on the genre in which you choose to work, you can have a wonderful life or just wish you'd thought of something else.

So, if you care enough to cast caution to the wind, go for it; if not, retain it as an interesting hobby without the pro-induced nervous tensions that never go away, even after you retire.

Rob C
Logged

Justan
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1860


WWW
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2013, 11:37:21 AM »
ReplyReply

Hey guys! Am looking for some help as I am starting my own business eeek  Smiley So, some info if you're interested..I've been taking photos for about 4 years now, and got into editing about 2 years ago. My friends have encouraged me to start my own photography business as they think I've got what it takes. Thing is, I might have what it takes but I've researched the competition and it's tough. So, I've been looking to see how I can get more people to view my site. I've found that Facebook and Twitter are good ways to get more traffic..anyone who owns a business use those? I also came across http://www.icontact.com/features/social-media-marketing/facebook-publishing but not really heard anything about it. But really, I'd love to know if anyone here uses Facebook or Twitter to promote their business maybe? Or if you know other ways to do it, please let me know! I am new to this but you know, since I  got involved and invested a lot of time and money too, I really want to make it a success! And advice is welcome, thanks Smiley


I started a foto business a few years back and my experiences have been that the best successes come from actively getting in front of the buying public. This translates to doing shows where the results of each show are many times over what gallery exhibits produce. Shows bring in up to 10s of thousands of people, who are looking to exchange their cash for something they like.

Using web resources to display and wait is a passive approach and you may do well with that approach, but a lot of other talented artists do the same thing and don’t succeed.

Buying art photography is an impulse purchase. In most cases the path to success with this genre of products involves getting your products in front of as many people as is possible who are be interested and want to fulfill an impulse to “buy now.”
Logged

Rob C
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12215


« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2013, 11:49:11 AM »
ReplyReply


I started a foto business a few years back and my experiences have been that the best successes come from actively getting in front of the buying public. This translates to doing shows where the results of each show are many times over what gallery exhibits produce. Shows bring in up to 10s of thousands of people, who are looking to exchange their cash for something they like.

Using web resources to display and wait is a passive approach and you may do well with that approach, but a lot of other talented artists do the same thing and don’t succeed.

Buying art photography is an impulse purchase. In most cases the path to success with this genre of products involves getting your products in front of as many people as is possible who are be interested and want to fulfill an impulse to “buy now.”



Your field is very different to the one that I knew, but I think the essentials are exactly the same: be there where folks need your product. Unfortunately, for several branches of photography that usually means life in a capital city, with matching cost of living. Yet another reason for starting in this business as a single guy (or gal).

Rob C
Logged

GeekMark
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2013, 05:22:35 AM »
ReplyReply

FWIW - I think your motivation for success is of the wrong kind.

To have a chance, it should already be an obsession, something you just can't stop getting yourself involved with, despite all the advice, good, bad or simply misplaced. It also helps your chances if you are young, single and might enjoy living in a squat for a while.

I think a lot of the arts are similar; consider the Rolling Stones: the two top guns did just that, without hot water and even an idea of getting rich or successful - they say - it was the lure of the blues. Period. Read Keef's book, Life. He could just as easily be writing about photography.

Negative advice? Maybe, but also realistic unless you are already loaded to the point that you can support yourself (hence the appeal of singularity) for a minumum of six months with nothing coming in. I got into this racket for myself after six years of working for other people and learning a tiny bit about how such businesses work. So, I had my six month's-worth of capětal, but even then, before it got better I ended up in the red, not because I didn't find work, but because ad. agencies used to stipulate three months after month of invoice as pay-day... banker to the rich, I was. And that was when work wasn't that tough to find. If you can survive that first period, it encourages and toughens you up, both qualities becoming essential as the clientele goes higher up the scale.

Depending on the genre in which you choose to work, you can have a wonderful life or just wish you'd thought of something else.

So, if you care enough to cast caution to the wind, go for it; if not, retain it as an interesting hobby without the pro-induced nervous tensions that never go away, even after you retire.

Rob C



Thanks for sharing this, it was very insightful! To be fair, I am being realistic here and I won't be doing something as crazy as giving everything up just for this. The plan is to branch out and have a little taste of how the business goes..meanwhile I'll still keep my job to have a steady income. I think an obsession could potentially be a dangerous thing, in my opinion you need to think everything through clearly before making decisions.
But I guess we'll see what happens, maybe one day it will become an obsession, and maybe then I'll give up everything just to try and make it. Who knows.
Logged
GeekMark
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 10


« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2013, 05:23:44 AM »
ReplyReply


I started a foto business a few years back and my experiences have been that the best successes come from actively getting in front of the buying public. This translates to doing shows where the results of each show are many times over what gallery exhibits produce. Shows bring in up to 10s of thousands of people, who are looking to exchange their cash for something they like.

Using web resources to display and wait is a passive approach and you may do well with that approach, but a lot of other talented artists do the same thing and don’t succeed.

Buying art photography is an impulse purchase. In most cases the path to success with this genre of products involves getting your products in front of as many people as is possible who are be interested and want to fulfill an impulse to “buy now.”


Thanks for the advice Justan! I'll definitely consider this when thinking about how to promote my work  Smiley
Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad