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Author Topic: Recommended RIP  (Read 1658 times)
mdg
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« on: September 02, 2013, 10:26:47 PM »
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I have acquired Epson 3885 recently and I really enjoyed printing my Fine Art black and white images.  I am currently using Epson driver ABW mode for printing.  I would also like to try RIP software but I'm not sure which one should I use.  I am looking at ImagePrint or QTR but I am not sure which is suitable for me.  Would it make sense to go into using RIP software even I'm still new in printing?

I am also looking at trying Piezography later.  Please give me your recommendation on which RIP software is best for this.

Thank you.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2013, 10:28:28 PM by mdg » Logged
Peter Langham
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2013, 11:49:08 PM »
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You can try QTR for free.  It is simple to use if you can use existing profiles.  It uses a bit less color inks then ABW.  It allows for split toning.  If you are going to use Peizography later, it is designed for QTR.  I don't know anything about Imageprint, so no recommendation on that.
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aaronchan
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« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2013, 12:44:46 PM »
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Just like what mdg said, use Quadtone RIP. It's free!
Also if you are willing to do ONLY B&W prints, you can convert your 3885 into a B&W only printer with Piezo K7 ink.
I'm using it with my 9800, the way of the look of the image it's just so good, won't be able to get that kind of feeling with UC K3 inkset.

Aaron
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Schewe
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« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2013, 02:11:58 PM »
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Just like what mdg said, use Quadtone RIP. It's free!

Technically, it's shareware but the author does suggest paying a shareware fee if you decide you want to use it in your workflow...from the quadtonerip.com website:

All of the proprietary pieces of the QuadToneRIP product i.e. other than the Gimp-Print code are bundled together and licensed as a Shareware product. You are free to download and try the product. It is a fully operational product, there are no disabled parts or dongles. If it meets your needs and you want to use any pieces for your regular workflow, please pay a shareware fee of fifty dollars $50. At the present time there is no registration but this is subject to change. This fee can be applied per user so one user can use as may printers as he/she wants, or the fee can be applied per printer so one printer can be used by many users. The fee will also entitle you to any bug-fix updates. Profiles distributed here are included and others are free to swap and distribute profiles among other QuadToneRIP customers without restriction.

Paying the shareware fee ensures that Roy gets a fair compensation for his work...
« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 02:13:44 PM by Schewe » Logged
aaronchan
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« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2013, 03:44:27 PM »
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Technically, it's shareware but the author does suggest paying a shareware fee if you decide you want to use it in your workflow...from the quadtonerip.com website:

All of the proprietary pieces of the QuadToneRIP product i.e. other than the Gimp-Print code are bundled together and licensed as a Shareware product. You are free to download and try the product. It is a fully operational product, there are no disabled parts or dongles. If it meets your needs and you want to use any pieces for your regular workflow, please pay a shareware fee of fifty dollars $50. At the present time there is no registration but this is subject to change. This fee can be applied per user so one user can use as may printers as he/she wants, or the fee can be applied per printer so one printer can be used by many users. The fee will also entitle you to any bug-fix updates. Profiles distributed here are included and others are free to swap and distribute profiles among other QuadToneRIP customers without restriction.

Paying the shareware fee ensures that Roy gets a fair compensation for his work...

Thanks for the correction. Actually I did pay since I use it to print for my clients.
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mdg
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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 03:08:44 AM »
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Thanks for your advice.  I downloaded the QTR and started to use it (and yes I did pay for the $50).

However, forgive me if my understanding is incorrect.  When I use the Curves Setup and Curves Blending, should the preview of the image reflect to the settings I made?  I even tried printing it anyway and it is still in Black and White and not sepia or warm or blue.  I keep going back to the manual and I'm not sure what I missed.  Btw, since my Epson is still new, I am still using the default inks that came with it.  I plan to deplete them first before going into Piezo inks later on.

So going back to my question, the tones (based on the Curves Setup and Curves Blending) will only be possible on Peizo inks? without a preview?

I am using both MAC Mountain Lion and Windows 7 for Photoshop CC.

Please enlighten me on this one.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 05:44:20 AM by mdg » Logged
Peter Langham
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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2013, 11:16:34 PM »
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The preview will not reflect the image tone of the print.   For that you would have to create your own RGB ICCs and soft proof.  You should be seeing the result of the curves you use in your print.
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mdg
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« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2013, 09:00:03 AM »
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The preview will not reflect the image tone of the print.   For that you would have to create your own RGB ICCs and soft proof.  You should be seeing the result of the curves you use in your print.

Thanks Peter for the tip.  I have decided to convert to Piezo and will start with K7 Selenium.
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SangRaal
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« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2013, 09:51:14 PM »
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Download and read the latest Pieziography manual(dated early 2013) from Jon Cone's Piezography blog site (yes it's free) it will answer most if not all  of your questions(and give you new ones).
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