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Author Topic: Which flash bracket?  (Read 3165 times)
walter.sk
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« on: September 03, 2013, 03:51:01 PM »
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I'm using a Canon 5DIII and have on occasion needed to use a flash bracket.  I have a Custom Brackets folding bracket that has allowed me to mount the camera so that the handle on the bracket is on the right side, and I rotate the camera counterclockwise to go from landscape to portrait.  The flash is on an arm that flips to the right orientation.

This worked with my ancient but wonderful 1DII, but with the 5DIII it does not leave me enough room to get my right hand in position for reaching the "*" button for focus and the shutter button.  I also have a RRS L-bracket mounted on the 5dIII, and do not use an add-on battery holder/vertical grip.

I would consider either a similar flash-flip bracket or a camera-rotate bracket but don't know which to try.  It is inconvenient to head for a camera shop that has these on display.

Do any of you use such a bracket with a camera the size of the 5DIII with similar button placement?  My wish list includes:  Light weight, ease of use, and probably, a way to stand the camera/bracket combo on a flat surface when not holding it.  While I would like low cost, I'd spend what it takes to get a bracket I'd actually use.
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k bennett
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« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2013, 07:23:54 PM »
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I do not own one, but I'd love to have one of these RRS flash brackets. It attaches to the L bracket on the left side of the camera, and has a flip over arm for shooting verticals.
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Equipment: a camera and some lenses.
leuallen
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« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2013, 08:14:09 PM »
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I've used many brackets as a now retired wedding photographer. I prefer the camera rotating version because it can be quickly mounted on a tripod with easy change from horizontal to vertical. Not possible with the flip type. I use a CustomBrackets model and am satisfied. Good customer service. 

Larry
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stever
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« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2013, 10:29:15 PM »
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have the original version of the RRS bracket (not sure exactly what the changes are to the latest model) and also have some Wimberley bracket modules (but not the flipper which is more or less equivalent to the RRS).  i'm satisfied with the RRS, but am not using it that much.  I like the ability of the Wimberley modules which are lighter and I can configures for macro and long lenses as well as people.  the RRS is heavier and better looking, Wimberley is lighter and can be configured for a variety of uses

in my experience both Wimberley and RRS are very helpful, and if you don't like it, they'll take it back
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Vladimirovich
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« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2013, 10:52:01 PM »
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I'm using a Canon 5DIII and have on occasion needed to use a flash bracket.  I have a Custom Brackets folding bracket that has allowed me to mount the camera so that the handle on the bracket is on the right side, and I rotate the camera counterclockwise to go from landscape to portrait.  The flash is on an arm that flips to the right orientation.

This worked with my ancient but wonderful 1DII, but with the 5DIII it does not leave me enough room to get my right hand in position for reaching the "*" button for focus and the shutter button.  I also have a RRS L-bracket mounted on the 5dIII, and do not use an add-on battery holder/vertical grip.

I would consider either a similar flash-flip bracket or a camera-rotate bracket but don't know which to try.  It is inconvenient to head for a camera shop that has these on display.

Do any of you use such a bracket with a camera the size of the 5DIII with similar button placement?  My wish list includes:  Light weight, ease of use, and probably, a way to stand the camera/bracket combo on a flat surface when not holding it.  While I would like low cost, I'd spend what it takes to get a bracket I'd actually use.


I 'd assume an extra wide (or long) clamp mounted on CB shall allow you to move your camera body to the left... if not then a combo of clamp-long plate + clamp on CB
« Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 11:04:39 PM by Vladimirovich » Logged
b2martin
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« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 07:03:05 AM »
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I have the RRS bracket that is referenced above and it works great.  It attaches to the RRS L bracket mounted to the camera and you can mount the camera on a tripod that has a RRS clamp in either position. 
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walter.sk
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« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2013, 11:02:30 AM »
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Thanks for the replies.  I'm looking into the possibilities suggested here.  The idea of keeping my Custom Bracket's gizmo is appealing, and it may be possible for me to drill a few holes in the base to move the camera as little to the left as might be needed.  Problem might be de-centering the flash from the lens axis, but maybe not. 

I'm open to other suggestions, too.
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