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Author Topic: Ultrasmooth Matt Art papers - still good when framed?  (Read 1363 times)
narikin
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« on: September 04, 2013, 02:37:32 PM »
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I am intrigued by all the Ultra Smooth Matt Art Papers there are about now - from Epson's own Hot/Cold Press, through Canson, Innova, and Hahnemuhle, etc - I tested some for big prints, and they look pretty good on the table after printing with those velvety tones and total lack of reflections.

BUT... you then have to frame them, and that means glass, which has reflections, so my question is to Matt Art users - if your work is framed and glazed, do most of those Matt advantages disappear?  What about if you use the expensive anti-reflection glass - any better?  There seems no point in using them only to have glass with all its reflection placed on top!

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iluvmycam
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« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2013, 02:41:48 PM »
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Matte is very delicate. The blacks will mar up with minimal handling. You should frame or sleeve quick. Even sleeving causes maring if not careful...and I've tried them all!
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narikin
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« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2013, 03:04:02 PM »
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Yes, I appreciate that. It is a real problem, but... again - if you DO manage to get it into the frame ok, does the glass undo the advantages of using matte in the first place?
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davidh202
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« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 07:29:34 PM »
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 Matt prints show much better under glass than gloss or luster ...no secondary reflections off the print ;-)

I use Epson hot and cold press papers for all art reproductions that I do, and hot and cold press and Exhibition Fiber for  just about all my own prints. The only time I use Prem Luster for clients is if they want "budget" prints and I have to compete with the big box guys!
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 07:35:13 PM by davidh202 » Logged
Mike Guilbault
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2013, 10:14:51 PM »
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Same here... I love the Epson Cold Press prints and under non-glare glass, you'd swear you can touch the print.  Wouldn't go any other way.
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Alan Goldhammer
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« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2013, 05:43:10 AM »
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I regularly frame Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Ultra Smooth and it looks perfect under plexiglass.
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Lee Rentz
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« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2013, 11:57:32 AM »
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Use Tru Vue AR glass or Museum Glass, each of which has a high-tech coating to minimize reflections. These make all photographs look better than using either regular picture-framing glass or traditional etched non-glare glass. Museum Glass provides better UV protection than AR glass, with an anti-UV coating on the side of the glass that faces the art.
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narikin
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2013, 03:50:54 PM »
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Use Tru Vue AR glass or Museum Glass, each of which has a high-tech coating to minimize reflections. These make all photographs look better than using either regular picture-framing glass or traditional etched non-glare glass. Museum Glass provides better UV protection than AR glass, with an anti-UV coating on the side of the glass that faces the art.

Yes, I thoroughly checked out the UV situation dealing directly with the Swiss manufacturers of a leading brand some time back, and teh UV cut stuff is a little bit of an upsell if you ask me.

IIRC, Regular framing glass cuts 15% of UV, the high quality AR framing glass cuts about 70% of UV due to its coating. The UV cut or 'Museum' glass gets that up to about 97%, but this is often accomplished with a laminate layer inserted between 2 sheets of glass.  So you get a heavier and thicker glass, which gives a stronger color shift to the image, and most importantly, nobody knows what will happen to that laminate itself over the years - will it yellow, or go brittle, or suffer from crazing?   

When you you remember that the average gallery and home is light by Tungsten or Halogen lighting, with dramatically less UV, it all seems a no brainer. I went for the straight AR stuff - seems like the best compromise.

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John Chardine
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« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2013, 03:39:51 PM »
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I am intrigued by all the Ultra Smooth Matt Art Papers there are about now - from Epson's own Hot/Cold Press, through Canson, Innova, and Hahnemuhle, etc - I tested some for big prints, and they look pretty good on the table after printing with those velvety tones and total lack of reflections.

BUT... you then have to frame them, and that means glass, which has reflections, so my question is to Matt Art users - if your work is framed and glazed, do most of those Matt advantages disappear?  What about if you use the expensive anti-reflection glass - any better?  There seems no point in using them only to have glass with all its reflection placed on top!

Just to say the Cold Press paper I've seen has a significant texture so not "ultra smooth". Hot-press is very smooth.

In my experience, a matte print under glass is hard to beat.
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John
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« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2013, 02:54:17 PM »
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I have printed a fair bit of matt under glass and love it. Museum Etching under glass still looks delicious  Wink
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