Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Framing question  (Read 766 times)
huguito
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 229


« on: September 04, 2013, 04:37:30 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi
I am framing a print that will have the edges deckled (English a second language in case that's not the spelling).
I want to fix the print to a solid matt as backing and put a second mat around with an opening large enough to show the thorn edges of the print.

Question;
How to stick it to the matt?   I can only think of using a adhesive shit as in the ones hot activated  used a hot press

Any other way to mount it?
Would you glue it with Miracle Muck?
Would you coat it?

Huguito
Logged
Martin Archer-Shee
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 85


« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2013, 05:38:49 PM »
ReplyReply

hi

I do a small amount of mounting for myself. I have found at an art store a roll of double sided tape about 5mm wide. It is just the right stuff as it is also non acid and will not affect the mat boards. No hot press etc needed.

Good luck
Martin
Logged
DeanChriss
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 281


WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2013, 05:44:57 PM »
ReplyReply

As far as I know, the "adhesive shit" (aka dry mount tissue) in a heated press is the best way, but you can use a "V-hinge" instead. This is similar to a normal T-hinge but it is completely hidden by the print. You can find detailed explanations along with pictures if you just Google "v hinge". Usually work mounted in this way has a mat with an opening large enough to leave the edges of the paper exposed, and the whole thing is framed behind glass. If you are not using glass long term durability of a paper print will definitely be an issue due to the access of curious fingers and the buildup of dirt over time. Perhaps someone else can advise on coatings as I never use them.

Edit: Note that hinging will let the print move or "breathe" slightly as varying humidity levels cause expansion and contraction of the paper relative to the backing. Without a hinge you can get wrinkles, sometimes serious ones if humidity changes dramatically.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 05:48:37 PM by DeanChriss » Logged

- Dean
davidh202
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 547


« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2013, 07:19:22 PM »
ReplyReply

 As a matter of fact I had a woman in my shop just today with a family collage to frame that was  permanently mounted to a paper board in 1905, and it was in beautiful condition even though there was no such thing as acid free back in the day! 
I have been a custom framer for 20 well over years and in the photo retail industry long before that and I drymount  (heat press and AF tissue) every one of my prints. It provides THE most stable way of keeping a print flat and attached to the backing. Period.
It was good enough for Ansel ...It's certainly good enough for me. Of course if a customer insists after I explain the benefits of drymounting , I will hinge, and do their mount  "archival" .;-)

I'm real tired of hearing the "I want to mount my stuff so it will retain it's "value" and really be worth a lot of money some day argument! There is no real justification for that with the outrageous proliferation of photographs out there today.
JMHO
David   
Logged
huguito
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 229


« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2013, 08:01:31 PM »
ReplyReply

Hi David,

What is the complete name of the "AF" tissue you mention?

Have you mounted in that fashion leaving the image open? Just treated to a couple of applications of a coating like Glamour II?
I like the idea of the image exposed

Hugo

Logged
davidh202
Sr. Member
****
Online Online

Posts: 547


« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2013, 08:27:45 PM »
ReplyReply

"AF" is abbreviation for acid free .You should not heat mount an already coated print!
Most of the dry mount 'heat activated' tissues today are PH neutral. Drytac  makes a couple, and Décor Moulding Supply sells some under their own brand name. I have used a product called Vistamount from M&M distributors for many years but you need a wholesale license to do business with them (now Omega Moulding). You can usually find some at good art supply companies any PH neutral will do just fine.
I might add... try to get a tissue that bonds at low temps, below 180 f  and you have to let the mounted package cool under a weight. I use a very large sheet of 1/4 inch glass on my work  table.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2013, 08:46:58 PM by davidh202 » Logged
Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad