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Author Topic: Running a Test Print  (Read 1124 times)
JB Rasor
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« on: September 05, 2013, 04:28:27 AM »
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Forgive my naive question, but I've only recently begun my own printing.

When running a nozzle check test print, with my Epson Pro 3880, is it necessary to use photographic paper? Or is regular old office paper perfectly fine?

I run a nozzle check each day, per Lula's expert advice, so I hate to waste photo paper if not necessary.

Thanks again all!
JB
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #1 on: September 05, 2013, 04:34:33 AM »
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Any paper will do.
3880 is one of the only printers that does not require regular nozzle cleans.
Not sure where on LuLa you heard that about this printer,maybe another.
On my 3800 I might have done a dozen a year.
On my new 3880 I did one when I purchased it 6 months ago and that was it.
If you are not printing for any extended period then I would run one.
The best printer Epson has ever made in that regard.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 04:37:25 AM by Dan Berg » Logged

JB Rasor
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« Reply #2 on: September 05, 2013, 05:01:33 AM »
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Thanks Dan! I run the nozzle check before making prints per the Lula tutorial, "From Screen to Print." Michael Reichmann and Jeff Schewe agreed it was a good idea whenever the printer sits more than a day or two. I could have misinterpreted, but always opt for safety.
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Garnick
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« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2013, 08:04:58 AM »
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Hi JB,

I can't offer any advice concerning the 3800/80, since I've never used one.  However, considering all of the accolades it has received on this and another forum I would agree with Dan on his assessment.  I still run one of my 7600 printers along with the 9900.  Obviously the 9900 NEEDS nozzle checks and likely cleaning cycles on a regular basis, and for many years I've used plain office paper for that purpose.  I get four nozzle patterns, two per side, one at each end.  I then cut the patterns off one end and use that end for two more, one per side.  Total, 6 nozzle check patterns per sheet.  Call me cheap, but it works.  Good luck with your printing endeavours.

Gary   
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digitaldog
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« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2013, 08:58:08 AM »
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Use the cheapest plain paper for this task. I too have a 3880 and find it almost never needs to be cleaned while my 4900 needs it constantly. That said, it is still a good idea to run a nozzle check even for the 3880 if you haven't used it in awhile. 99 times out of 100 you'll find all nozzles are firing but considering you can use that plain paper to check 4 times before you recycle it, it's good a practice.
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Andrew Rodney
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JB Rasor
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« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2013, 02:25:56 PM »
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Thank you all!

That's a relief that I can use cheap paper. I'll probably scale the nozzle checks back to weekly or bi-monthly now, instead of every couple days.

Great advice...as always.

JB
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2013, 04:15:14 PM »
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Based on my experience with a 3800, I'd only perform a nozzle test print before printing, even if that is after 2 months of sitting idle. I usually get a perfect nozzle check with an occasional missing magenta nozzle or two. No need to turn the printer on just to do a nozzle check. I'm not certain but you may lose a bit of ink each time the print is fired up.
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Randy Carone
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« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2013, 11:57:23 AM »
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interesting ..  the 3800   always magenta.....
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StuNY
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« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2013, 12:14:10 PM »
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If I have printed in the last week or two I don't do a test with my 3880. Even if longer I rarely do a test first unless I am going for a large print straight away. Occasionally my printer has sat for a couple months and then I did tests- and usually found a couple slight clogs that were cleaned up with a cleaning cycle. BUT, if you tend to print all matte or all gloss for longer periods of time (6+months), you will find that the sitting ink can get clogged in the tank itself. When I switch from gloss to matte I pop the sitting tank and give it a quick swoosh before changing over.
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