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Author Topic: Custom DSLR modification, remove AA filter  (Read 1362 times)
mouse
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« on: September 05, 2013, 03:49:39 PM »
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By pure chance I have come across the website of a company, LDP LLC
http://www.maxmax.com/

It is a company that specializes in various optical products covering the IR and UV spectrum, and in related camera conversions.  My interest was particularly piqued by a conversion which they term "Hot Rod Visible".  This involves removing the stock AA-ICF filter and replacing the ICF filter with one of their own.

When one looks at the posted photos comparing a stock camera with a modified version (Nikon D200, D700 and others) the difference in detail/resolution is both obvious and striking.  Of course I realize that these comparisons have been posted by a company whose interest is clearly in selling their product.  That said, I have no reason to doubt their integrity but I would surely like to have some independent evaluation or comments relating to this conversion.

A search turns up an article in LuLa which deals with an IR conversion performed by this company.
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/infrared%20dslr.shtml

Other than this I can find no commentary or evaluation of the company itself or of the Hot Rod conversion in particular.  I will be most grateful for any remarks or links to such information
« Last Edit: September 05, 2013, 03:51:44 PM by mouse » Logged
mouse
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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2013, 10:52:16 PM »
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Bump.

Surely someone must know something about this modification.  Thanks.
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kaelaria
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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2013, 12:36:33 AM »
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There have been multiple companies doing it for years.  Real world results are often much less that what may appear on the site.  The cost is very high compared to just buying a more modern camera without the filter in the first place IMO.  It's also less effective the smaller the resolution of the sensor.
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2013, 02:48:44 AM »
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Hello,

Why bother just buy a Nikon D800E.

Cheers

Simon
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Simon Harper
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Rob C
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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2013, 03:05:27 AM »
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Hello,

Why bother just buy a Nikon D800E.

Cheers

Simon


One answer might be: because I already have a D200 and don't much care to use it for usual photography because I also have a D700.

That prices may be high is always a threat - price is also something that depends for its spectrum position on the individual wallet! I, for example, have a pretty robust wallet with very little to put into it other than the lottery ticket and a couple of snaps of my wife!

http://www.naturfotograf.com/

This chap, above, has done such D200 camera conversions for himself, as far as I remember.

Rob C
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HarperPhotos
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« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2013, 03:18:51 AM »
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Hi Rob,

What information I got from the the two links from Mouse's post is to remove an AA filter is about $450.00US dollars plus fright.

Why would you spend that sort of money on a D200 or even D700 when a D800E has vastly superior resolution and most importantly the widest dynamic range of and camera and MFDB I know of. If a person is prepared to look into such an under taking I can assume they are serious about there photography and are after the best quality so there is only one answer in a SLR format a Nikon D800E.

Cheers

Simon
« Last Edit: September 08, 2013, 03:34:36 AM by HarperPhotos » Logged

Simon Harper
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« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2013, 06:09:35 AM »
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$450 vs $3000. That's a pretty big difference.  Now, if you wanted to make the comparison to the new D7200, it gets a little more reasonable.

There are plenty of reasons; however, why one would go the conversion route rather than just buy a camera without the filter.  Cameras with no AA filter (or two in the case of the D800E) don't also have the IR capability that someone may be looking for.  Cost is another reason. 
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Paul2660
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« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2013, 09:03:56 AM »
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Maxmax has been doing this type of conversion for years.  They originally specialized in the Canons but have apparently started working on others also.  I contacted them for a conversion on a 1ds mkii and hd several conversations with them but instead osolf the 1ds and purchased the 5d mkii. 

I would have no concerns about send in your Nikon.

Paul Caldwell
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Paul Caldwell
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kaelaria
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« Reply #8 on: September 08, 2013, 12:09:39 PM »
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I wasn't even talking about the D800 - try the D7100 for a little over a grand, guys.  Done.
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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #9 on: September 08, 2013, 01:11:18 PM »
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Hi,

It is very possible that the loss of acutance by the OLP filter can be compensated by a bit more sharpening. The Maxmax images do display a lot of color moiré, for instance.

Personally, I think that smaller pixels with optimal OLP filtering is the best route.

http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/index.php/photoarticles/76-my-medium-format-digital-journey?start=9

http://echophoto.dnsalias.net/ekr/index.php/photoarticles/75-aliasing-and-fake-detail

Best regards
Erik

quote author=mouse link=topic=81871.msg661072#msg661072 date=1378414179]
By pure chance I have come across the website of a company, LDP LLC
http://www.maxmax.com/

It is a company that specializes in various optical products covering the IR and UV spectrum, and in related camera conversions.  My interest was particularly piqued by a conversion which they term "Hot Rod Visible".  This involves removing the stock AA-ICF filter and replacing the ICF filter with one of their own.

When one looks at the posted photos comparing a stock camera with a modified version (Nikon D200, D700 and others) the difference in detail/resolution is both obvious and striking.  Of course I realize that these comparisons have been posted by a company whose interest is clearly in selling their product.  That said, I have no reason to doubt their integrity but I would surely like to have some independent evaluation or comments relating to this conversion.

A search turns up an article in LuLa which deals with an IR conversion performed by this company.
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/cameras/infrared%20dslr.shtml

Other than this I can find no commentary or evaluation of the company itself or of the Hot Rod conversion in particular.  I will be most grateful for any remarks or links to such information
[/quote]
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joneil
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« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2013, 10:27:31 AM »
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 I sent my camera off to Kolari Vision for IR filter modification- which is less expensive than than AA filter and removal.    Here is the link to thier web site for this serviceL:

http://www.kolarivision.com/antialiasingremoval.html

   I find the other companies that do IR modification also do AA filter removal.  So I would ask those companies.   As for the filter removal itself - does it make any difference?  I don't know.  I suspect the notice will not be signifigant on small prints or web sites, only on large prints. 
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mouse
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« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2013, 01:51:22 PM »
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Many thanks to all for your replies.

Rather than the cost efficiency of such a conversion, I was most interested in confirming the substantial improvement in resolution depicted on the maxmax site.  As Erik has suggested, one may be able to achieve the same effect by judicious application of sharpening.
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