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Author Topic: Panasonic GX7 field report  (Read 6509 times)
Telecaster
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« Reply #20 on: September 13, 2013, 04:11:38 PM »
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Too bad Panasonic forgot that in English, manual actually means auto.  Smiley

Yeah, I caught that after I posted.   Smiley  Pentax actually has an explicit TAv mode that varies ISO in accordance with shutter and aperture values. On the Nikons I've used, and on the Oly E-M5, manual mode isn't truly manual if ISO is set to Auto. Same with the Fuji X-E1 except that unlike the others it disables exposure compensation...foolish.

-Dave-
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michael
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« Reply #21 on: September 13, 2013, 04:28:36 PM »
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Michael,

What I don't understand is how you can sub-label your review "the best MFT yet" and never mention the new OMD-EM1 offering from Olympus?  Sure, it is not technically out yet, but there are a number of reviews already posted on the web and all are very positive.  But, not even a mention of it seems strange.

Neil

It would have made no sense for me to include the E-M1, for several reasons.

Firstly, the camera didn't even officially exist until last Monday. The GX7 review was conducted and written weeks ago.

Secondly, even though there are reports out there, they in no way allow me to make any claims about the camera myself. I didn't even have the E-M1 in my hands until last night. Now I have a sample for review, and will be publishing a rolling review starting in a few days.

Which is better? We'll see.

Michael
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AFairley
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« Reply #22 on: September 13, 2013, 04:44:43 PM »
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I didn't even have the E-M1 in my hands until last night. Now I have a sample for review, and will be publishing a rolling review starting in a few days.

It must be nice to get hold of all the new toys as soon as they come out.   Grin
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Isaac
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« Reply #23 on: September 13, 2013, 04:45:16 PM »
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a rolling review starting in a few days

I look forward to it! Your camera and lens reviews are always interesting, even though I'm not looking for a new camera and even though the lenses cost more than I will ever pay.

Incidentally, luminous-landscape is listed under "Gear Reviews" in Visual Poetry: A Creative Guide for Making Engaging Digital Photographs.
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image66
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« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2013, 04:48:52 PM »
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I am certainly interested in the GX7. It is the first m43 camera that is in any way the successor to the DMC-L1. Unfortunately, I have a real love/hate relationship with that camera. Here's hoping the GX7 expunges the hate items.

Electronic shutter is THE killer feature of this camera. I am likely to get one just because of it. A silent camera (except for the sound of the iris stopping down) is HUGE when doing wedding and event photography.

But that E-M1 has my heart.
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Vladimirovich
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« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2013, 04:56:31 PM »
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Electronic shutter is THE killer feature of this camera. I am likely to get one just because of it. A silent camera (except for the sound of the iris stopping down) is HUGE when doing wedding and event photography.

it is not a global shutter and as such it takes around 1/10 sec to expose/read all rows in sensor, no flash possible... so do you still want that for wedding and events ? electronic first curtain shutter (like sony SLTs) is way more useful... this one is useful for still life only... GH3 for example has it, not impressed for anything that moves a little
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 04:58:15 PM by Vladimirovich » Logged
image66
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« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2013, 05:06:29 PM »
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If that is the case, you are correct in that it defeats the purpose. Sony's method of electronic first curtain is likely the best available right now.

1/10 second? Can you say "jello?"

Otherwise...
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John Camp
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« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2013, 05:11:42 PM »
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Michael,

What I don't understand is how you can sub-label your review "the best MFT yet" and never mention the new OMD-EM1 offering from Olympus?  Sure, it is not technically out yet, but there are a number of reviews already posted on the web and all are very positive.  But, not even a mention of it seems strange.

Neil

I've argued here before that *the* critical feature of m43 is camera/lens/system size. You can buy excellent cameras from major makers with more extensive systems than m43 (Nikon, for example) with better sensors and for less cost than the big m43 entries (24mp Nikon D7100 for $1,146.95m at B&H.) And the thing about the EM1 (like the DH3) is that in terms of size, it's getting up into that DSLR territory...it's a bit smaller and lighter, but not so you'd really notice. And it's stuck with that absurd penta-prism housing...So if you want M43's killer app, so to speak, you need to seriously consider the GX7, because it's still quite small, and has some compact but high quality prime lenses available. As for IBIS, I spent the best part of 40 years shooting cameras without IBIS, and managed to get sharp photos on a pretty regular basis. It's nice, but not critical, as far as I'm concerned; besides, I have quite a few Panny IS lenses. The auto-ISO issue is more important to me, but if you put a gun to my head, I'd have to admit that I can live without that, too. But for the places that I'd want to use m43, size is the main issue; otherwise, I'd go to the D800.
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Telecaster
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« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2013, 05:44:49 PM »
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John, I have to disagree with your argument to an extent. Size & weight are certainly factors in choosing m43 gear, but for me the real deal-makers are the use of EVFs and the accuracy (at least under the conditions I care about) of sensor-based AF. With the exception of the Big Blob Pentax, which in my use is a fun but ultimately niche camera, I've had it with D-SLRs. Too many AF annoyances, too much manual focusing hassle. Since I rarely shoot critters racing or soaring through the landscape, the current superiority of PD-AF for continuous tracking doesn't matter. Stuff like seeing histograms & color balance setting in the VF does matter. Being able to precisely manually focus using the VF matters. Thus--and since I don't make big prints (bigger than 15x20" or so, that is) and have no interest in doing so--I chose the system that checks off, for me, the most boxes. The fact that some of the lenses happen to be stonking good doesn't hurt either.

I speak only for myself. YMMV. Etc.

-Dave-
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meyerweb
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« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2013, 10:01:38 PM »
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I have to take issue, at least partially, with John's post, too.

Cameras like the GH3 are close in size to the smallest DSLRs, but in terms of build-quality, features and many performance areas they're more competitive with mid-range and better DSLRS (though certainly not pro-level ones). A GH3 may be the same size as an EOS Rebel, but that camera is more realistically compared to something like the G5, which is smaller still. Compare a GH3 to a 7D, or 70D, and it's quite a bit smaller. Add a couple of f/2.8 zooms to each system, and the difference is magnified.

For what it offers, a GH3 kit is still quite compact.
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barryfitzgerald
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« Reply #30 on: September 14, 2013, 04:33:14 AM »
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GX7 looks a lot more interesting than the E-P5 (for numerous reasons)
EM-1 price is quite silly really (for European buyers)

Maybe it's just me but I think Panasonic are being more aggressive and better priced in my part of the world.
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Neil_Brander
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« Reply #31 on: September 14, 2013, 05:38:43 AM »
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Micheal,

Thank you for that explanation.

Neil
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michael
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« Reply #32 on: September 14, 2013, 08:21:13 AM »
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It must be nice to get hold of all the new toys as soon as they come out.   Grin

While true, and fun, it's also a huge amount of work. Doing a proper field report takes at least 40-60 hours of research and writing, not to mention shooting, which is the fun part.

Michael
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