Ad
Ad
Ad
Pages: [1]   Bottom of Page
Print
Author Topic: Canon 1Dx ethernet tethered and Lightroom5  (Read 5775 times)
nemophoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 478



WWW
« on: September 13, 2013, 02:05:23 PM »
ReplyReply

I have a shoot coming up for which the editor want me to tether. (I've never really liked shooting tethered, except in strict studio settings, and greatly prefer using CF cards.) What I love about the 1Dx is using the ethernet cable instead of the slow USB2. What I don't really like is having to use the EOS Utility and DPP. I'd prefer to use Lightroom or something else. I haven't really found a way to make that happen. (Capture One said specifically to my request that they don't support the ethernet tether, so that's out.) I was curious if anyone else was able to get the 1Dx to work ethernet cable tethered with something other than Canon's software? Thanks.

Nemo

(cross-posted on Digtial Cameras et al)
Logged

Ellis Vener
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1723



WWW
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2013, 02:31:24 PM »
ReplyReply

In Lightroom 5 there is an option in the File menu for tethered Capture.
Logged

Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
nemophoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 478



WWW
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2013, 02:46:24 PM »
ReplyReply

True, but when I tried it recently, Lightroom couldn't see the 1Dx because it was tethered with the ethernet cable rather than USB. Could be some setting i have wrong, but Canon's software, of course, picks it up instantly (almost). I guess I could try launching just EOS Utility and then Lightroom and see if it works, but seems the two would conflict.
Logged

Ellis Vener
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1723



WWW
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2013, 02:53:05 PM »
ReplyReply

True, but when I tried it recently, Lightroom couldn't see the 1Dx because it was tethered with the ethernet cable rather than USB. Could be some setting i have wrong, but Canon's software, of course, picks it up instantly (almost). I guess I could try launching just EOS Utility and then Lightroom and see if it works, but seems the two would conflict.
in the past I've done that (EOS Utility to import to a Lightroom watched folder on the desktop . It was clunky but it worked .
these days for tethering with the 1D X I use the CamRanger system, Images are recorded on  the camera's CF cards and a preview (along with the Live view image) goes to to the iMac or to the iPad.  CamRanger nominally lets you control the camera from the computer or tablet butthey now have a
"guest" mode where the person receiving can't adjust the camera's settings. I haven't used it but it is there  http://www,camranger.com
Logged

Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
nemophoto
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 478



WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2013, 03:18:51 PM »
ReplyReply

I did the watch folder as well. Very cludgy. The Cam Ranger sounds interesting -- been reading about it. In this case, too late (Monday shoot) and it needs to be files directly to the computer rather than simply viewed by the client. I'll fool around with everything over the weekend and see what I can do. I think the issue becomes that the camera forms an ad hoc network with the camera (or visa versa) when using the ethernet cable (not unlike wireless transfer), rather than being seen as a since device like a hard drive.
Logged

Ellis Vener
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1723



WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2013, 03:26:03 PM »
ReplyReply

I think the issue becomes that the camera forms an ad hoc network with the camera (or visa versa) when using the ethernet cable


that might very well be the case in which you should be able to configure the computer to accept it. Here is Canon Europe's advice:

In a first for an EOS DSLR camera, the EOS-1D X features a built-in RJ-45 connector for cabling directly to a LAN network. This is similar to the RJ-45 connector found on the WFT-E2 II for the EOS-1D Mark IV, however it is a Gigabit Ethernet port allowing higher speed data transfer.

With the LAN port, it is possible to carry out the same image transfer and camera control operations that are also available using the WFT unit. The five features of the wired LAN connection are: FTP Transfer, EOS Utility, WFT Server, Media Server and Time Sync.

In FTP server, images can be uploaded directly to an FTP server on a network, for example to a picture desk. With EOS Utility mode, the camera can be remotely controlled to use Live View, adjust settings and focus, capture images and download them directly to a computer. It is the same as having a USB cable connection to the camera. The WFT Server functions allow you to control and browse the camera directly from a web browser from anywhere in the world. The Media Server functions allow you to connect the camera to a DLNA compatible device, like HD televisions and game consoles, and so playback images and movies from the camera.

The final function is totally new to the EOS range. With a direct LAN cable, or using the new WFT-E6 WiFi unit, you can synchronise to time settings of several EOS-1D X cameras. This Multi Camera Time Sync Function is of great benefit if you are shooting an event with several cameras as it allows you to easily put your images into a timeline after the event. Equally, if you work with several other photographers to cover an event you can easily timeline the event afterwards to ensure that the story is told in chronological order.

It's from page 11 of http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content/education/technical/eos_1d_x_explained.do
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 04:09:58 PM by Ellis Vener » Logged

Ellis Vener
http://www.ellisvener.com
Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
bcooter
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1051


Bang The Drum All Day


WWW
« Reply #6 on: September 13, 2013, 04:58:50 PM »
ReplyReply

I have a shoot coming up for which the editor want me to tether. (I've never really liked shooting tethered, except in strict studio settings, and greatly prefer using CF cards.) What I love about the 1Dx is using the ethernet cable instead of the slow USB2. What I don't really like is having to use the EOS Utility and DPP. I'd prefer to use Lightroom or something else. I haven't really found a way to make that happen. (Capture One said specifically to my request that they don't support the ethernet tether, so that's out.) I was curious if anyone else was able to get the 1Dx to work ethernet cable tethered with something other than Canon's software? Thanks.

Nemo

(cross-posted on Digtial Cameras et al)


I like dpp and EOS utility with the 1dx.   Shot (honestly 8,000) files into it and never crashed.   Crazy and as far as I know C1 or Lightroom won't tether to the 1dx with ethernet but that's what makes it so stable.

Anyway . . .

We run dpp and bridge to monitor a folder to make it easy to check focus and it will refresh itself.

I have run to a hot folder and done a lightroom preset in the past (not with the 1dx) but someone has to refresh and monitor it as you go.

If you want an effect look, go for the lightroom hot folder, if your AD just want's the straight out of camera look, try dpp and Adobe Bridge.

IMO

BC
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 08:12:57 PM by bcooter » Logged

phila
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 259



WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 20, 2013, 04:13:14 AM »
ReplyReply

The problem with tethering to Lightroom is that (last time I looked anyway) you can't change camera settings etc. I've taken tens of thousands tethered shots over several years using EOS Utility and a watched folder (via USB). I'll have to try it with Ethernet!
Logged

bcooter
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1051


Bang The Drum All Day


WWW
« Reply #8 on: September 20, 2013, 07:22:28 PM »
ReplyReply

The problem with tethering to Lightroom is that (last time I looked anyway) you can't change camera settings etc. I've taken tens of thousands tethered shots over several years using EOS Utility and a watched folder (via USB). I'll have to try it with Ethernet!

I don't understand why people don't like DPP?  Yea it's kind of a 1999, Microsoft looking interface, but it's rock solid, it's FREE and nothing will process the look of a Canon file (without work) like DPP.

The ethernet tethering is just the most stable tethering on the planet and you can run a cord from the studio to 7th ave. if you wish.  

I can understand if you want to show a final look and want to do some faux post work via lightroom, but in that case, it takes a digital tech, or some third/fourth/fifth assistant that just taps on the lightroom folder every now and then to refresh it.

I guess the only problem in using a third/fourth/fifth assistant is you'll have to show him/her how to work software that actually has a real serial number.

IMO

BC
« Last Edit: September 20, 2013, 07:49:08 PM by bcooter » Logged

Pages: [1]   Top of Page
Print
Jump to:  

Ad
Ad
Ad