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Author Topic: Is This The Ultimate Outdoors Tripod?  (Read 3421 times)
Chairman Bill
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« on: September 18, 2013, 12:29:31 PM »
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Not sure if this is the right part of the forum for this, but here goes ...

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Is This The Ultimate Outdoors Tripod?
New Kickstarter-funded TrailPix Ultralight Tripod looks like a promising solution to the outdoor photographer's biggest issue.
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/gear-news/is-this-the-ultimate-outdoors-tripod/11460.html
There's an new ultra-lightweight camera tripod out there in the form of the new TrailPix Ultralight, a Kickstarter-funded project that promises to deliver a full-sized tripod capable of supporting a 4lb digital SLR reliably yet weighing less than an iPhone. (cont)
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jjj
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« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2013, 01:49:22 PM »
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Neat solution. I like it.
Not that I use treking poles myself, But I've seen plenty of people using them.
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NancyP
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« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2013, 06:02:48 PM »
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I use trekking poles myself. They are helpful in negotiating slippery surfaces and in carrying multiday pack. The conventional extra use for poles is hanging a tarp. Personally, I am less than keen about jamming my cork handles into the dirt, so this, even with a small camera, would be No Go. Besides, am I going to trust anything larger than an iPhone on this rig? No. Way. I hang my 5.5 pound tripod and head on the back of my pack. (I am shopping for a second light tripod, circa 3 to 3.5 pounds with head.)
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jjj
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« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2013, 06:05:18 AM »
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My alternative to using a heavy tripod for stability when I cannot carry my Benbo is to use a light tripod and add weight to it. I usually hang my camera bag on tripod and instant solid tripod.  Smiley
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fike
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« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2013, 08:19:33 AM »
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Id rather cope with the inconvenience of the gorrilapods.  They are small and more versatile despite the fact that you have trouble getting them up to eye level.  These sorts of gadgets are one-hit-wonders that quickly find their way into the back of the closet.
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Fike, Trailpixie, or Marc Shaffer
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I carry an M43 ILC, a couple of good lenses, and a tripod.
alatreille
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« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2013, 02:20:52 PM »
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Id rather cope with the inconvenience of the gorrilapods.  They are small and more versatile despite the fact that you have trouble getting them up to eye level.  These sorts of gadgets are one-hit-wonders that quickly find their way into the back of the closet.

+1

I think my closet is full!
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Eric Brody
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« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2013, 03:50:27 PM »
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Sounds like a pretty good idea for a mirrorless camera like the Olympi or my Fuji X E-1. I did not see, or missed the cost, but it has to be less than a $600 small light Gitzo 1 series.
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Dwight Adams
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« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2013, 05:59:53 PM »
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Ability to merely support a camera doesn't mean jack. Lots of tripods can support cameras. Fewer can support them without vibrating when the shutter is tripped. This thing may be light and compact, but personally I wouldn't waste my money on it unless I read a reputable field review that recommended it.
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sanfairyanne
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« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2013, 12:10:25 AM »
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I agree with Dwight, this tripod might weigh as much as an i-phone. I think it's likely that it won't support much more than that.
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Glenn NK
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« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2013, 10:53:34 AM »
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It took me the "classical" four tripod approach to get it right (the first three were sold on consignment); I'm not going back there again.

Glenn
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NancyP
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« Reply #10 on: September 23, 2013, 05:25:02 PM »
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So what is YOUR Ultimate Outdoors Tripod, version 4?
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Glenn NK
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« Reply #11 on: September 23, 2013, 07:28:20 PM »
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So what is YOUR Ultimate Outdoors Tripod, version 4?

Nothing is Ultimate, nor is anything Perfect.

My main tripod use is flower macro -  often on the ground, and in awkward positions.

I opted for a Gitzo Explorer with an offset "centre post" that will extend in any direction and any angle from straight up to almost straight down.

Equipped with custom made 125 mm long (5") spikes which stick into the ground, it won't tip over even when the centre of gravity is beyond the feet.

The legs have no "click stop" positions, but lock in both directions (inward and outward) for added stiffness, stiffness being the key, not strength.

With an Acra-tech ball head, the total is not too heavy.  I carry the camera, lens, and ballhead all on the tripod over my shoulder if I  hike any distance - and I usually know which lens to take. Wink

Hiking poles would be a nuisance - and they usually come in sets of two, not three.  Cheesy

Glenn
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jjj
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« Reply #12 on: September 24, 2013, 05:31:32 AM »
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Hiking poles would be a nuisance - and they usually come in sets of two, not three.  Cheesy
Duh! Seeing as gadget is aimed at people who already use hiking poles, I doubt they'd be considered a nuisance. And the third leg is either a tent pole or the matching accessory pole and a bipod can be quite useful for video work or allowing slower shutter speeds than if just handheld.
I think people are missing the point with this. It's not aimed at serious photographers, it's for minimal carrying weight/space saving but with the ability to use a tripod if so needed whilst trekking as opposed to going out doing photography. Even if it isn't as sturdy as a large Benbo, it's still much better than not having a tripod. Plus as I mentioned above, just suspend some weight like your bag from tripod and voila much sturdier tripod.

The people on here who are landscape or more serious photographers are really not the target market, so of course it's unlikely to suit their needs. It's like sports photographers complaining that a pocketable camera is pointless as it's no good for their job. They're great for street photography though.  Smiley
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Deardorff
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« Reply #13 on: October 06, 2013, 06:49:00 AM »
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You don't get something for nothing and a tripod too light won't be solid enough for the job.

The hanging bag is nice but if you put your camera bag against one leg it will dampen vibration better.

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