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Author Topic: Can you calibrate the NEC Pa242.BK with a Color Munki?  (Read 2268 times)
Dan Berg
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« on: September 24, 2013, 03:45:56 PM »
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Just ordered a new NEC monitor without the spectraview calibration hardware/software
because I have a Color Munki.
Anyone used theirs to calibrate a NEC?
« Last Edit: September 24, 2013, 03:47:30 PM by Dan Berg » Logged

digitaldog
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« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2013, 06:21:56 PM »
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Should work, at least the US version supports that instrument. But you DO want to use SpectraView, not the ColorMunki software!
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2013, 12:37:22 AM »
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Thank you Andrew.
I will have to see if the software comes with the monitor.
They wanted $250 extra for the Spectranview version so I doubt it comes with since I opted out because I own the Munki.
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Czornyj
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« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2013, 02:33:16 AM »
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If it's ColorMunki Photo, you need to get SpectraView II profiler alone (99$).

If it's ColorMunki Display, Create - just forget it, use MultiProfiler.

Use NEC MultiProfiler to calibrate and profile the display without a sensor until you'll get the software. You can also download basICColor display, activate 14 day trial and calibrate your NEC for the first time.
basICColor display has an irritating flaw - it calibrates the PA display backlight brightness to ~160cd/m^2, no matter what target/settings you set, so NEC SpectraView II is a better option IMO, and I'd rather get it instead of basICColor profiler. But you could try it in the meantime Wink
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KirbyKrieger
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« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2013, 06:33:36 AM »
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Can someone correct and bolster my flimsy understanding of the difference?

As I understand it, if you calibrate with the Munki device and the X-Rite software (each called "ColorMunki Photo"), the process uses your expensive NEC monitor as a light source only: the calculations are done by the software and stored and applied by the OS.  If you use SpectraView II, the Munki device is used, as before, to measure the monitor's output, but the calculations are done by NEC's SpectraView II, the process is different (and presumably better -- among much, it communicates directly with the monitor), and the results are stored in the monitor and applied by the monitor.  I'm also under the impression that SpectraView II provides wide-gamut calibration, and that ColorMunki does not.

Thanks in advance.

Kirby.
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Czornyj
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« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2013, 08:56:44 AM »
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CMP software doesn't use the precise, 14(16) bit 3DLUT of NEC PA to calibrate the display. Instead it's using 8bit 1DLUT of a graphics card, so the calibration is not as precise and it spoils image quality.

The calibration maintains gamut as wide as it is, but you can't limit the gamut while calibration to a smaller one (AdobeRGB or sRGB for instance).
 
Can someone correct and bolster my flimsy understanding of the difference?

As I understand it, if you calibrate with the Munki device and the X-Rite software (each called "ColorMunki Photo"), the process uses your expensive NEC monitor as a light source only: the calculations are done by the software and stored and applied by the OS.  If you use SpectraView II, the Munki device is used, as before, to measure the monitor's output, but the calculations are done by NEC's SpectraView II, the process is different (and presumably better -- among much, it communicates directly with the monitor), and the results are stored in the monitor and applied by the monitor.  I'm also under the impression that SpectraView II provides wide-gamut calibration, and that ColorMunki does not.

Thanks in advance.

Kirby.
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Dan Berg
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« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2013, 09:01:32 AM »
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If it's ColorMunki Photo, you need to get SpectraView II profiler alone (99$).

If it's ColorMunki Display, Create - just forget it, use MultiProfiler.

Use NEC MultiProfiler to calibrate and profile the display without a sensor until you'll get the software. You can also download basICColor display, activate 14 day trial and calibrate your NEC for the first time.
basICColor display has an irritating flaw - it calibrates the PA display backlight brightness to ~160cd/m^2, no matter what target/settings you set, so NEC SpectraView II is a better option IMO, and I'd rather get it instead of basICColor profiler. But you could try it in the meantime Wink

It is the Photo version.
$99.00 I can handle that.
Thanks for the good info.
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KirbyKrieger
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« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2013, 08:48:46 AM »
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Thanks.   Smiley

CMP software doesn't use the precise, 14(16) bit 3DLUT of NEC PA to calibrate the display. Instead it's using 8bit 1DLUT of a graphics card, so the calibration is not as precise and it spoils image quality.
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