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Author Topic: Vision Issue - mirrorless cameras  (Read 2192 times)
joneil
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« on: October 11, 2013, 09:00:42 AM »
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Dumb question time.

First off, I think these mirrorless cameras, regardless of brand are amazing overall.  I still love my D700 DSLR, and you can have it when you pry it out of my cold, dead fingers, but that being said, seeing and trying out these new cameras (different brands), overall, an amazing system that can put out some really good images.

Now here's my problem.  No complaints, just an observation, and wondering if anyone else has this issue.  I have hyper sensitivity to bright light.  Had it all my life, since my first memory of childhood.  Likely born with it, or so I am told.   I have to wear sunglasses outside even on cloudy days.  Flip side is, I have really good night vision.  Anyhow, I find it almost impossible to use these new mirrorless cameras because the display in the eyepiece hurts my eye.  I can use it the "regular" way - that is, bring it up on the LCD like you would using live view on a DSLR, but for me personally, the way I like to shoot, I like looking through the viewfinder/eyepiece while i am shooting.  As per usual, your mileage may and can vary.

I have tried with and without my sunglasses on, and other settings, but I just find the displays, different brands, either uncomfortable or downright painful to use.  Now, as I pointed out, i have weird eyes to begin with, but I am just wondering if anybody else finds they have this kind of issue? 

thanks


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David S
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« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2013, 11:40:23 AM »
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I too need sunglasses outside much of the time. I have turned down the brightness of the EVF which allows me to use the evf outside in bright sunshine.

Might help you.

Dave S
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scooby70
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« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2013, 06:40:57 PM »
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I thought I was the only one, actually I don't need sunglasses and I'm fine with the EVF in daylight but not in low light.

I have a Panasonic G1 and it's light output is fantastic. Even when adjusted for best effect I just can't use it in low light. I've only tried one other CSC, a Nex 6, and it was exactly the same.

Frankly, I just know how any human can use these cameras in low light.



If they could fix this problem and up the DR of the EVF I'd happily move fully to CSC.

Sadly and frustratingly this is something that I've never seen mentioned in any review.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2013, 06:46:31 PM by scooby70 » Logged
AFairley
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« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2013, 07:36:39 PM »
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Guys, why don't you buy a square of neutral density gel, cut a piece out and put it in the viewfinder, would cut down the brightness of the OVF without degrading the image.
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scooby70
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« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2013, 07:06:24 AM »
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I've tried that, well, I've tried holding various strength ND's up to the EVF and it doesn't help. Yes it cuts down on the light but the amout of detail you can see is reduced to the point that the EVF isn't usable.
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Remo Nonaz
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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2013, 10:38:47 AM »
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The GH2, and likely more recent Panasonic M43 cameras, have a setting for the LCD/viewfinder brightness. If it too bright, just go into the menu and turn it down. (Ref. page 58 in the GH2 user's manual.)
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I really enjoy using old primes on my m4/3 camera. There's something about having to choose your aperture and actually focusing your camera that makes it so much more like... like... PHOTOGRAPHY!
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