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Author Topic: New Epson Scanner Rumors  (Read 3474 times)
drewk425
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« on: October 13, 2013, 12:34:55 PM »
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I have been experiencing some problems with my Epson V700.  I've considered replacing it with a V750-M, but before doing that I wonder if anyone has on the forum has information regarding the long rumored V900?   
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Doug Fisher
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2013, 10:35:55 AM »
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That V900 rumor was from one person and it was posted/started many years ago.  Not aware of any recent rumors for a V7xx replacement.  Epson did recently announce an upgrade to the v500/600 that added some social networking functions but I don't think it did any upgrading to the optical scanning hardware.

Look closely at the differences between the V700 and 750 to make sure you would actually use/value the V750 at a higher price.  The v700 is usually the better deal for most people.

Doug
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drewk425
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« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2013, 10:54:58 AM »
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Thanks Doug,

You validated my belief that Epson won't develop an upgrade into a ever shrinking market.  Too bad!

Drew
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artobest
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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2013, 04:54:47 AM »
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Care to share what problems you are having with your V700?
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Fine_Art
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« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2013, 11:57:21 PM »
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Look into a Canon Canoscan. I have seen side by sides with epsons where the epson shows significant blur at high resolution while the much cheaper canon is fairly clear. I also have an epson. I always wanted to remove the thick glass that causes the gausssian blur. Dust always kept me from doing it. The epson has resolution that is wasted in the design. Canon glass seems clearer or maybe they use coatings.
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Justinr
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« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2013, 05:24:14 AM »
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Look into a Canon Canoscan. I have seen side by sides with epsons where the epson shows significant blur at high resolution while the much cheaper canon is fairly clear. I also have an epson. I always wanted to remove the thick glass that causes the gausssian blur. Dust always kept me from doing it. The epson has resolution that is wasted in the design. Canon glass seems clearer or maybe they use coatings.

I have an old Canon 9950f which has started making some 'interesting' noises and was never very good with transparencies. Are the newer Canons any better? I'm looking to replace this model but worry that a new Canon would still churn out dull images that lack any sense of strong colour or vibrancy.
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Doug Fisher
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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2013, 11:15:49 AM »
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Scanning is as much an art as a science.  There is a myth that scanning can easily be just a one button push process that results in great scans.  There has been very little advancement in scanner technology for a number of years.  If you are getting dull scans, it is most likely due to software settings or things not being set up to calibrate correctly.  Additionally, scans that are initially and intentionally flat are often actually preferable because that usually means the maximum amount of data is there which gives you more working room in Photoshop (e.g. nothing is clipped).  I would rather have all of the data there and then do the tweaking in Photoshop where I have more control versus the cookie-cutter approach that the scanning software can apply.

My guess is that maybe your scanner needs lubrication and that it is straining.  If true this will eventually cause failure of the motor and/or gears.  The most common areas needing lubrication are the sliding rails.  I would open up the scanner and try a very minimal lubricating of the rails using a lubricant that has minimal vapors or outgassing.  Clean the underside of the glass while you have it open.  You will probably find a film on the underside from the outgassing of plastic over time.

Doug
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Justinr
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« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2013, 05:07:40 AM »
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Scanning is as much an art as a science.  There is a myth that scanning can easily be just a one button push process that results in great scans.  There has been very little advancement in scanner technology for a number of years.  If you are getting dull scans, it is most likely due to software settings or things not being set up to calibrate correctly.  Additionally, scans that are initially and intentionally flat are often actually preferable because that usually means the maximum amount of data is there which gives you more working room in Photoshop (e.g. nothing is clipped).  I would rather have all of the data there and then do the tweaking in Photoshop where I have more control versus the cookie-cutter approach that the scanning software can apply.

My guess is that maybe your scanner needs lubrication and that it is straining.  If true this will eventually cause failure of the motor and/or gears.  The most common areas needing lubrication are the sliding rails.  I would open up the scanner and try a very minimal lubricating of the rails using a lubricant that has minimal vapors or outgassing.  Clean the underside of the glass while you have it open.  You will probably find a film on the underside from the outgassing of plastic over time.

Doug

Hi Doug

I might try a poke around, I note that there is some sort of catch underneath it which will grant access, what would you recommend in the way of lubricants?

It has always performed well with negs but I've never enjoyed much success with trannies to be honest although it's few years since I have seriously used it. I think I've tried most of the tricks in the book but if you have any definite pointers as to where I might be going wrong then I'm all ears.

Justin.

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Joe S
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« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2013, 12:55:00 AM »
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I have never used the Canon but on my Epson the negatives are held in a holder at a fixed height off the glass and it works well.  Transparencies rest on the glass directly and are subject to the random varied heights of the mounts.   Not so good for focusing!
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