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Author Topic: Window Reflections - Architecture Photography  (Read 3158 times)
Kaypee
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« on: October 24, 2013, 12:43:50 PM »
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Hi. I want to shoot the inside of a restaurant from outside and through the glass but the refections are really harsh. I have tried a polariser but there is still too many reflections for the image to work well. I have seen a number of architectural photographs of glass buildings where the inside has been clear and the glass has had very limited reflections. Exposure blending is one option but I need at least one shot with the refections at a minimum but I just cant seem to get it. Any and all hep welcome.
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Ellis Vener
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« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2013, 10:00:34 PM »
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Two techniques come quickly to mind: set up really big black panels to reflect black into the windows or shoot two images, one during the day and one after dark.

And of course there are the options of lighting everything or doing a hell of a lot of "reconstructive" work in post production.
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Ellis Vener
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Creating photographs for advertising, corporate and industrial clients since 1984.
BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #2 on: October 25, 2013, 03:38:54 AM »
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Two techniques come quickly to mind: set up really big black panels to reflect black into the windows or shoot two images, one during the day and one after dark.

Hi Ellis, I agree, my thoughts exactly. One needs to reduce or eliminate the luminosity of the source of the refection, the exterior structures are the issue.

Either darkening the exterior (shooting at night) or blocking the features (with black screens, perhaps in sections and combining layers in darker blending mode) seems to be all that can be done (other than taking out the window pane or extensive postprocessing).

Cheers,
Bart
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BernardLanguillier
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« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2013, 04:29:13 AM »
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Another option worth investigating may be to shoot a "translated pano" from inside?

I have not tried this, but here is the idea:
- pick your intended outside shooting point, direction and framing.
- figure out a plane inside the building that is perpendicular to the intended direction and located rear/front in such a way that the entire frame can be covered by moving inside the building,
- capture as many images as needed by moving sidewise with 30% overlap,
- use PTGui to stitch the images.

This would not always be possible but may end up being easier if showing the outside of the restaurant is not needed? This sort if recreates an impossible shot where the windows and walls have become transparent.

Cheers,
Bernard
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Fine_Art
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« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2013, 12:03:08 PM »
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Reflected light is polarized. Search Brewster's angle. You need a normal or longer lens with a polarizer.

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