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Author Topic: Camera/Lens for shooting furniture scene  (Read 2264 times)
davidweiss
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« on: October 26, 2013, 04:36:42 AM »
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Hi all,

My company is intending to buy a camera for professional furniture scene shooting (which will be used for advertisement / catalog etc). May I know which camera better suits the purpose? I am looking at either a Nikon D7000/D7100 with 18-105mmVR or canon 70D with 18-135 STM

Or should I be looking at higher ranges such as Nikon D600 with 24-85mm VR or Canon 5D Mark II/24-105 7D/18-200mm

Thanks in advance!
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tom_l
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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2013, 11:24:33 AM »
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I do quite a bit of furniture, but not in the higher segment of the market.
Not sure if a zoom lens is the way to go. On a FF Nikon , a nice set of lenses would be the 45mm and 85mm PC Nikkor with some basic movements. Don't go too wide, except if you need to shoot your furniture on a location.

But since we are here on a MF Forum, the ultimate tool would be a Hassi with a HTS and a set of 2 or 3 lenses or of course a view/tech camera with two lenses between 60 and 100mm.

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MrSmith
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« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2013, 01:45:21 PM »
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I shoot similar stuff. My ideal lens doesn't exist for my canon. A 35mm tilt/shift. I use a 24and a1.4x to give me a 33mm even with the converter it's better than the 45 ts-e that I got rid of, I also use the 90ts-e which is a great lens. As above 24mm is usually too wide unless on location.
Nothing worse than interiors/furniture with converging verticles unless it's intentional. Not tried it myself but a top quality 35 or 50mm may better handle de converging verticles in post than a zoom.
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eronald
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« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2013, 02:39:00 PM »
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I shoot similar stuff. My ideal lens doesn't exist for my canon. A 35mm tilt/shift. I use a 24and a1.4x to give me a 33mm even with the converter it's better than the 45 ts-e that I got rid of, I also use the 90ts-e which is a great lens. As above 24mm is usually too wide unless on location.
Nothing worse than interiors/furniture with converging verticles unless it's intentional. Not tried it myself but a top quality 35 or 50mm may better handle de converging verticles in post than a zoom.

I agree; a shift lens, and probably very long exposures.

Edmund
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Yelhsa
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« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2013, 03:07:05 PM »
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Look for one that comes with a person that doesn't need to ask, would be my suggestion - especially if your company is planning on spending a lot of money here, on these ads or in getting these brochures printed.

Common Law of Business Balance:
"It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money - that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do."
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2013, 03:08:23 PM »
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I agree; a shift lens, and probably very long exposures.

Yes, and good lighting, and good postprocessing/tonemapping, and ... a competent photographer.

Cheers,
Bart
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markmullen
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« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2013, 07:05:25 PM »
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Look for one that comes with a person that doesn't need to ask, would be my suggestion - especially if your company is planning on spending a lot of money here, on these ads or in getting these brochures printed.

Common Law of Business Balance:
"It's unwise to pay too much, but it's worse to pay too little. When you pay too much, you lose a little money - that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do."

I can't disagree with this, you're showcasing your products, you owe it to yourself to have them shown off in the finest way possible, buying a camera and trying to shoot them yourself is a poor alternative to getting a pro in, they'll take care of colour accuracy, lighting, perspective etc, all of which take a long time to learn 

I bet you'll find your sales figures increase sufficiently by having top quality photos of your products to offset the cost of having them photographed.
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Ken R
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« Reply #7 on: October 26, 2013, 08:00:17 PM »
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Hi all,

My company is intending to buy a camera for professional furniture scene shooting (which will be used for advertisement / catalog etc). May I know which camera better suits the purpose? I am looking at either a Nikon D7000/D7100 with 18-105mmVR or canon 70D with 18-135 STM

Or should I be looking at higher ranges such as Nikon D600 with 24-85mm VR or Canon 5D Mark II/24-105 7D/18-200mm

Thanks in advance!

Only the photographer that is going to do the job knows the answer. It is mostly personal preference based on the way he/she works, experience and style. The particular camera/lens choice is really not that critical, there are plenty of options that can work very well. More important is the lighting, composition, styling / art direction and workflow specially if it is going to be a high volume job where consistency is key.
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