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Author Topic: Singapore street scenes  (Read 8158 times)
Isaac
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« on: October 26, 2013, 10:31:34 AM »
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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-24399467
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Slobodan Blagojevic
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« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2013, 11:19:18 AM »
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Damn, Isaac, when I saw the title of this thread and "started by Isaac" I thought you finally decided to post your photography for us to see. Wink
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Slobodan

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« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2013, 11:21:47 AM »
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Thanks, Isaac. Some fascinating stuff in there. Sure beats landscape.

Yeah, I had the same reaction Slobodan had. Well. . . maybe someday huh?
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Rob C
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« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2013, 01:05:18 PM »
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Cameras probably won't last long there; you can set your watch by the mid-day rain. As for humidity... But what can you expect when you more or less straddle the equator?

But best of all: no gum; no inane insane chewing of absolutely nothing at all!

Rob C
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Telecaster
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« Reply #4 on: November 27, 2013, 02:41:56 PM »
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I've spent quality time in Singapore. Mostly shot video there. You deal with the humidity by storing cameras (and keeping all other electronic devices) in relatively dehumidified areas, preferably in cabinets containing dessicants within those areas.

The gum thing is exaggerated. Not that the government doesn't sometimes behave in an authoritarian manner—it does—but the current leadership has a lighter touch overall than in the past. Singapore is a place where you can go anywhere at any time of day or night and feel safe...but at the same time you know there are security eyes watching you. Unlike, say, in the West where you know you're being surveilled but in a manner and for a purpose that has nothing to do with your particular well-being.   Wink

-Dave-
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slackercruster
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« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2013, 08:57:31 PM »
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nice!
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Rob C
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« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2013, 03:06:57 AM »
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I've spent quality time in Singapore. Mostly shot video there. You deal with the humidity by storing cameras (and keeping all other electronic devices) in relatively dehumidified areas, preferably in cabinets containing dessicants within those areas.

The gum thing is exaggerated. Not that the government doesn't sometimes behave in an authoritarian manner—it does—but the current leadership has a lighter touch overall than in the past. Singapore is a place where you can go anywhere at any time of day or night and feel safe...but at the same time you know there are security eyes watching you. Unlike, say, in the West where you know you're being surveilled but in a manner and for a purpose that has nothing to do with your particular well-being.   Wink
-Dave-


Gum. Perhaps things have changed. When I was there - only once for about ten days - there was no gum visible on the pavements. I see no exaggeration: that's a huge advance on western pavements black with that crap; you should see Mallorca: gum and dog poop rule.

As for the purposes of surveillance techniques, I would question the views of anyone - self much included - on the ways of another land than one's own. How can we possibly know? For myself, I dreaded Florida, convinced I was going to be car-jacked or simply shot for being in the wrong place at the right time. Why do few people walk?

If Singapore requires cameras to read the streets in order to keep the citizen safe, doesn't that indicate that there really is a threat?

We were sitting one night in an open public place with a very British name, which I can't remember, where there are lots of stalls selling food. There was a commotion, and a chef ran out into the crowd, a pot of something boiling in his hand, chasing another guy running for his life... so much for calmness in the night. There was also the phenomenon of high littter: tv sets and other lethal litter chucked out of high-rise apartments.

It's the modern world: very often a case of no respect for anyone and no manners taught at home before kids even start to go to school. And then they say it should be the teachers' responsibility! Yet something else that some parents don't feel inclined to do. But yeah, a year off work for new parents - both of them! We inhabit a world of political madness.

Rob C
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Isaac
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« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2013, 01:33:04 PM »
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It's the modern world...

It's the world.
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Telecaster
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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2013, 03:41:37 PM »
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Gum. Perhaps things have changed. When I was there - only once for about ten days - there was no gum visible on the pavements. I see no exaggeration: that's a huge advance on western pavements black with that crap; you should see Mallorca: gum and dog poop rule.

There's still no gum on the streets. And I agree that's a nice thing. What I meant is the govt. is less heavy-handed now in its enforcement of such stuff. Which doesn't mean it's not enforced!

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If Singapore requires cameras to read the streets in order to keep the citizen safe, doesn't that indicate that there really is a threat?

I haven't seen many surveillance cameras there. I was refering to human eyes actually. Anyway the govt. clearly perceives some level of threat. Don't they all? Whether or not the perception matches the reality...that's hardly for me to say.

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We were sitting one night in an open public place with a very British name, which I can't remember, where there are lots of stalls selling food. There was a commotion, and a chef ran out into the crowd, a pot of something boiling in his hand, chasing another guy running for his life...so much for calmness in the night. There was also the phenomenon of high littter: tv sets and other lethal litter chucked out of high-rise apartments.

Sounds like Newton Circus. And I didn't mean to imply people in Singapore behave like placid robots. Hardly...they're our fellow humans, after all.   Wink  Never seen a TV set flying out of an apartment window either.   Shocked

-Dave-
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Rob C
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« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2013, 03:50:16 AM »
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There's still no gum on the streets. And I agree that's a nice thing. What I meant is the govt. is less heavy-handed now in its enforcement of such stuff. Which doesn't mean it's not enforced!

I haven't seen many surveillance cameras there. I was refering to human eyes actually. Anyway the govt. clearly perceives some level of threat. Don't they all? Whether or not the perception matches the reality...that's hardly for me to say.

Sounds like Newton Circus. And I didn't mean to imply people in Singapore behave like placid robots. Hardly...they're our fellow humans, after all.   Wink  Never seen a TV set flying out of an apartment window either.   Shocked

-Dave-



Yes, that's the name: Newton Circus! Sounded to me like a London Underground station!

High litter was also a mistake: I think they called it killer-litter, lethal junk hurled from high apartments.

What I will credt them with is the best prawns I've ever consumed and an equally delightful cold white called Chinese Chablis! Also saw there my perfect reincarnation of Boy George. Might even have been the real deal - I didn't actually want to know too much.

This shot was made in what was called either Chinese or Japanese Gardens.

I'm posting the image blind - I can't make this computer show the actual image, so working off a grid I sort of remember. Yes, right image but looks a bit warmish... I have to click twice to make the copy sharp.

Rob C



« Last Edit: December 06, 2013, 02:40:04 PM by Rob C » Logged

degrub
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« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2013, 02:16:22 PM »
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Probably at Jurong Gardens built in early '70s in Jurong Lake off of Boon Lay Way. It has both styles of garden. Still there last time i visited in 2011.

Frank
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Telecaster
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« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2013, 09:37:29 PM »
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Yes, that's the name: Newton Circus! Sounded to me like a London Underground station!

There's a Piccadilly Circus too, near the remnants of an old British military base. In 1997 my friend Monica & I did a "colonial tour" of such spots...must dig out the negs and digitize 'em.

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What I will credt them with is the best prawns I've ever consumed and an equally delightful cold white called Chinese Chablis!

What surprised me about Singapore during my first visit was the size of the Indian community and the breadth & quality of Indian food there. I expected fantastic Chinese & Malaysian dining, and wasn't disappointed, but I ate a lot of Indian food—everything from street vendors to food courts to upscale restaurants—and was never less than impressed. The neighborhood (well away from the shopping district) street vendors & stalls were actually the best...less touristy, bolder flavors.

-Dave-
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Telecaster
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« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2013, 07:25:24 PM »
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All is not well in the city-state:

http://bloom.bg/1jIH4zN

-Dave-
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degrub
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« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2013, 08:03:10 PM »
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At least Singapore is in an economic position to make changes and perhaps the will.

Frank.
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