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Author Topic: printing a portion of image out of lightroom  (Read 1681 times)
larkis
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« on: October 26, 2013, 11:55:59 PM »
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What is the easiest method to print a portion of an image out of lightoom that would represent a slice of a bigger print. For example, i want to make a 40x50" print at 180dpi and would like to print a few areas of that on 8.5x11 sheets to preview how the various image regions will hold up in the actual big print. In photoshop this is quite easy to do by copying portions of an image with a fixed size marque and pasting them into a smaller page document.
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Geraldo Garcia
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« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2013, 12:24:48 AM »
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I usually print stripes of the image.
Lets say I would want a 24x36" final print of a tricky image, I would probably print 2 or 3 stripes of 24x3" of the more potentially problematic areas. To do that I would create a 24x3" paper size, set Lightroom print module to "zoom to fill" and position the stripes by dragging the image. Quick, simple and provides real size crop stripes good for checking detail, sharpness, noise, colour accuracy... everything.

Best regards.
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elied
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« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2013, 02:57:45 AM »
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I create a Virtual Copy or two and then crop to  a small section and print using the same resampling and sharpening settings as will be used for the big one.
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lelouarn
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« Reply #3 on: April 29, 2014, 12:05:50 PM »
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Hi !
Any other ideas on how to do this ? So printing some (user selected)  part of an image on paper size X (perhaps in A4) corresponding to the same resolution as the full image at size Y (perhaps a pano with the width of A3 - 30cm) ?
This to test on a small paper size how a big print will look like.
It's got to be possible in Lightroom. If not ? Then it should be ? :-)
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Remo Nonaz
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« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2014, 12:21:48 PM »
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I'm sure this can be done in Lr but I'm not sure how efficiently. PS is the better solution for this. All you need to do is set up your print for the big size you want then change the paper size to the size of the test print you want. Then select "do not scale" in the printer setup box. You will get a warning that your image size exceeds the paper size, click OK, and voila - you have a nice little sample at 100% resolution. PS lets you pick the portion of the image you want to sample as well.

I've never been able to do this easily in Lr, and for this reason, still prefer to print out of PS though I confess the Lr print module has its advantages, too.
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PeterAit
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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2014, 03:43:22 PM »
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Make a virtual copy. Crop the copy to the area you want to print.
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Remo Nonaz
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2014, 04:11:55 PM »
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How do you crop the image so that you are getting a 100% resolution section at whatever proof size you are going to print - other than just estimating it and cropping the image accordingly?
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PeterAit
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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2014, 09:39:45 AM »
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How do you crop the image so that you are getting a 100% resolution section at whatever proof size you are going to print - other than just estimating it and cropping the image accordingly?

I do not understand what you are asking. What is "100% resolution?"
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Peter
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Wayne Fox
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2014, 01:10:06 PM »
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I think hes asking how to make a small test print of a portion of an image that will be an exact match to the resolution/detail size on the final full size print.

Easy to do if you are using roll paper, just print a full width strip only a few inches wide.  Also pretty easy if you are printing sheets and print a full width strip of several images on a single test page.  Tougher to do as OP requested, print an 8x10 section of a 30x40 print that is exactly the same size.

Ive never really tried it, I dont have any issues printing a 13x19 test print of the full image and printing larger sizes once Im happy.
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lelouarn
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« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2014, 04:15:10 AM »
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Thanks guys ! It seems PS is the way to go. I never print through PS - LR is soooo convenient, as it remembers all the printer settings. I'll give PS a try...
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PeterAit
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« Reply #10 on: May 02, 2014, 07:01:38 AM »
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I think hes asking how to make a small test print of a portion of an image that will be an exact match to the resolution/detail size on the final full size print.


With a little math this can be done.

1) Final goal is (say) a 30x40 print. Want to print an appx 8x10 " section at same resolution.
2) Determine pixel width of full image. Call with W1.
3) Crop desired section and determine its pixel width. Call this W2 and your ratio is W2/W1.
4) Print the crop at a print width of W3 = W2/W1 times 40 (the width of the final print).
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Peter
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