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Author Topic: Will the A7R fit the Rhinocam?  (Read 2846 times)
Sareesh Sudhakaran
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« on: November 09, 2013, 09:19:38 PM »
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The Rhinocam (about $500) takes a NEX 7, so it should probably take an A7R as well. The major difference being the sensor size. If it can, the resulting image can reach 200 MP within a 62.4 x 46.8 mm (645 sensor) area.

Question is: will it? Are there any optical or practical limitations that prevent it from working?
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uaiomex
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« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2013, 06:45:25 PM »
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I'm sure it fits but it is my understanding that the Rhinocam movements are optimized for the aps-c sensor. I don't know how will the manufacturer modify it to be dedicated to a full frame e-mount. Perhaps less notches for longer shifts?

Eduardo

The Rhinocam (about $500) takes a NEX 7, so it should probably take an A7R as well. The major difference being the sensor size. If it can, the resulting image can reach 200 MP within a 62.4 x 46.8 mm (645 sensor) area.

Question is: will it? Are there any optical or practical limitations that prevent it from working?
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Sareesh Sudhakaran
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« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2013, 02:56:19 AM »
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Thanks! I hope they do. It looks like an excellent solution for stitching on a budget.
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JimAscher
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« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2013, 09:57:44 AM »
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I'm sure it fits but it is my understanding that the Rhinocam movements are optimized for the aps-c sensor. I don't know how will the manufacturer modify it to be dedicated to a full frame e-mount. Perhaps less notches for longer shifts?

Eduardo


As a pleased Rhinocam user, I am guessing that, after trial-and-error, couldn't you just ignore the unit's designated "notch" settings, and work out settings of your own to accomplish the desired additional coverage area?
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Jim Ascher

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uaiomex
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« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2013, 03:34:25 PM »
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Jim,
I don't own this fine contraption so I could not know any better than you do. I imagine is possible but it may become slower. For actual seasoned owners of the Rhinocam I believe it could be a breeze to use it with the A7r but my bet is that Rhinocam will announce soon a model for FF E-mount.

Jim, I fancy this contraption a lot. Could you please show some of your best work with the Rhino?
Eduardo


As a pleased Rhinocam user, I am guessing that, after trial-and-error, couldn't you just ignore the unit's designated "notch" settings, and work out settings of your own to accomplish the desired additional coverage area?
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JimAscher
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« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2013, 04:42:47 PM »
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Jim,
I don't own this fine contraption so I could not know any better than you do. I imagine is possible but it may become slower. For actual seasoned owners of the Rhinocam I believe it could be a breeze to use it with the A7r but my bet is that Rhinocam will announce soon a model for FF E-mount.

Jim, I fancy this contraption a lot. Could you please show some of your best work with the Rhino?
Eduardo



Eduardo:  Assuming, as with the Original Poster (OP), that the A7r will fit the Rhinocam the same as with all NEX model cameras, having a larger Full Frame sensor should speed the process rather than slow it down, i.e., require fewer "takes" to assemble together the final stitched photo.   As to posting my "best" work," I regret that their size (each almost half-a-million KB) exceeds what I could post in this forum or otherwise on the internet.  For an approximation, look at the Port Townsend (Point Wilson) Lighthouse photo on my website.  Regards, Jim
« Last Edit: November 11, 2013, 04:47:03 PM by JimAscher » Logged

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Paul Roark
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« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2013, 10:37:24 AM »
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Being a medium format film to FF digital convert with some nice Zeiss MF glass, this concept has some real appeal.  Some questions I have include, first, what will be the effect of the inward-looking micro-lenses on the A7r sensor?  They would seem to be looking the wrong direction half the time.  Second, my experience with high even 18 mp (Leica M9) files is that the optics very often already limit the actual resolution of the file.  I'm quite certain my old Zeiss 50mm Distagon would be totally outclassed by the 36 mp Sony sensor.  I really wonder if the MF optics can compete with the combination of the best 35mm FF glass and software stitching that we already have.  But, no question, this is an interesting concept.

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com
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JimAscher
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« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2013, 08:14:54 PM »
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...  really wonder if the MF optics can compete with the combination of the best 35mm FF glass and software stitching that we already have.  But, no question, this is an interesting concept.

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com

Paul:  I find the Rhinocam to be a very useful, fairly distortion-free "stitching" tool, with which I use Hasselblad lenses, as they have a slightly larger image circle than the other medium format lenses the Rhinocam can accommodate.  Looking more recently at your web site, I notice that you're doing some interesting -- and quite impressive -- "stitching" yourself.  Might the Rhinocam be of any interest, or benefit, in your work at present?  Regards, Jim
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Paul Roark
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« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2013, 05:32:14 PM »
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I'm not sure if the Rhinocam will be of interest or not at this point.  I have the Canon Tilt and Shift lenses, and, frankly, I find I mostly grab the lighter, faster M9 and 35 and stitch in Photoshop.  For the very wide pans, I also find I like the cylindrical mode of stitching better than a rectilinear approach.  So, it's an interesting approach and I see the benefits in the accuracy of perspective, etc., which would be much appreciated in the cityscapes I increasingly like to do.

Do you have the 50 Distagon (non-floating element) for the Hasselblad?  If so, have you found it holds up well enough at infinity?  (My Rollei SL66 50 was very weak at very close focus, but for the cityscapes I have in mind, that would not be an issue.)

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com
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JimAscher
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« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2013, 12:21:28 AM »
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...Do you have the 50 Distagon (non-floating element) for the Hasselblad?  If so, have you found it holds up well enough at infinity?  (My Rollei SL66 50 was very weak at very close focus, but for the cityscapes I have in mind, that would not be an issue.)

Paul
www.PaulRoark.com

Paul:  My only connection with Hasselblad has been the two old lenses -- a Zeiss Sonnar 150mm and a Zeiss Planar 80mm -- I picked up cheaply, solely for use with the Rhinocam.   For me, they perform fine with my 16-megapixel NEX 5n.  However, I can imagine, with the OP, that with the 36-megapixel A7r the stitched Rhinocam images would prove quite impressively detailed.  Jim
« Last Edit: November 14, 2013, 10:45:33 AM by JimAscher » Logged

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