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Author Topic: Getting Color right: A not so easy to answer question ....  (Read 3823 times)
stamper
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« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2013, 03:59:52 AM »
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The fact that different camera manufacturers have different colour renderings make it difficult/impossible to get "natural color". Three photographers with different cameras - nikon/canon/pentax - shooting raw stand side by side composing the same scene and press the shutter at the same time. Different settings in camera and different colour rendition between the makers choice of colour will mean different looking images despite the same composition. Now which one of the three will be "natural color" ?
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petermfiore
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« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2013, 05:36:19 AM »
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For me color is very simple. Does it work and do I like it. Does it move me. Does it resonate with time. Lastly, do I like it.

Peter
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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There is no rule! No - wait ...


« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2013, 05:48:54 AM »
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For me color is very simple. Does it work and do I like it. Does it move me. Does it resonate with time. Lastly, do I like it.

Peter


Sure. But how does it work? Not asking questions lifts off you the burden of finding answers, of course ... Wink
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petermfiore
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« Reply #23 on: November 13, 2013, 05:56:15 AM »
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You are looking for answers from others for a very personal choice. The journey of color is yours alone. In the making and doing you will find your eye. A painter or photographer, it's the same path.

Peter
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #24 on: November 13, 2013, 05:58:47 AM »
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You are looking for answers from others for a very personal choice. The journey of color is yours alone. In the making and doing you will find your eye. A painter or photographer, it's the same path.

Peter

Exchange with others still is of value to me, even in highly subjective matters. I still can keep my own perspective but get a chance to broaden it.

Cheers
~Chris
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petermfiore
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« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2013, 06:19:10 AM »
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The best answer to your question, is also the the most difficult to grasp. It needs to feel right. The Science of color is a wonderful place to start, but it is by the rules. With it's adherence, in time, comes boredom. Now you are thrust on a path to create and play. Learning how to break the rules is the order of the day. You will now have the chance to develop your visual "voice". Hopefully your new voice will echo in the hearts of others.

Peter
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Isaac
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« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2013, 10:15:13 AM »
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This implies, that bringing a feeling of "natural color" across to the viewer requires to anticipate their frame of color experience.

Let's try to be practical (and perhaps gain Slobodan's approval) --

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Sometimes I see ... effects that I know will not appear believable on film because they will be much more spectacular in a photograph than what I am seeing with my eyes. In those cases I take great care to maintain visual sea level by introducing some sort of normal subject matter as a point of reference. Take, for example, a telephoto of a person silhouetted against an underexposed mountain face at dawn. The intense red colors may appear as if they have been heavily filtered, and the black silhouette may look like a montage of two images or a cutout introduced in a copy camera. By including other neutral ... effects in the image, it becomes more believable. Blue sky above the peak or blue shadows in the foreground show that the scene is not filtered. Shadows that connect with the silhouette make it appear more real.

Mountain Light
p202
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Isaac
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« Reply #27 on: November 14, 2013, 06:43:59 PM »
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I seem to remember reading Galen Rowell's account of a book reviewer who wrote that they didn't believe the photos in one of Rowell's books could have been made without color filters.

Actually, these words --

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In an Art Issues editorial, Rebecca Solnit wrote, 'Yosemite Valley, in its most usual condition, is a green or brown landscape with indifferent air quality." She went on to describe Galen Rowell as one of those wretched photographers "who use colored lenses to depict a souped-up, hot rod-bright world." Poor Rebecca must never have gotten up early enough to see alpenglow at dawn or to see the natural features crystallize during the clearing of a storm when the atmospheric perspective taught in art school vanishes in the absence of haze.

p189 Galen Rowell's Inner Game of Outdoor Photography
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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« Reply #28 on: November 15, 2013, 12:11:32 AM »
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Yup - there is so many derogatory comments around.
When it comes to subjective feelings and impressions,
where there is less objective control, people tend to
go wild, hack and slash and lose the thin layer of
civilized remains introduced formerly by an institution
called education.
Seems this is one of the few occasions where someone could tack it.
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