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Author Topic: shooting flying bird, still and movie  (Read 5851 times)
EinstStein
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« on: November 16, 2013, 10:58:42 AM »
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iI shoot mostly slow object, donot know how to shoot fast moving such as flying bird. My fastest af camera is Lumix G5.
I have seen an eagle catching fish taken with FZ200. I tried it once, but I couldn't get anything even close to that quality. The focus were off.

What do I need?
-- what skill should I practise? I am relatively comfortable in gun shooting. I had been trained in military service.
-- What camera is the best for flying bird? Nikon or Canon?, APS-C or FF, what lens?
-- or, may be a P and S? What?
« Last Edit: November 16, 2013, 11:00:32 AM by EinstStein » Logged
Christoph C. Feldhaim
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There is no rule! No - wait ...


« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2013, 11:05:17 AM »
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http://www.glennbartley.com/articles.htm
Smiley
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EinstStein
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2013, 05:38:17 PM »
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Thanks for the link, a lot of information.
This site suggest Nikon or Canon 1.5x cropped DSLR. A sales in a near camera store also recommend 7D for its fast auto focus and low light capability. I heard the optical finder, fast and accurate auto focus, genuine, unboosted low light capability, and somewhat larger magnification are the essential property.
Why no recommendation for any m43 or mirror-less? Weak in focus? Low light? Evf delay? Or simply no good Len?
This site also recommends Canon S95 or S110. I thought FZ200 a much more suitable PNS, no? Is this site up to date?
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LesPalenik
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2013, 12:00:57 AM »
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Most bird photographers use APS-C sized cameras with a long, fast zoom (300mm to 600mm).
If you get the birds used to a bird feeder in your backyard, you might be able to use a 70-200mm lens.
 
To shoot a flying bird, shutter speed of 1/1000s - 1/2000s should produce sharp pictures. If the bird is far away and flies towards you or if shooting with a short telephoto, you may get away with 1/500s-1/800s. To freeze the flutter of hummingbirds, you need at least 1/2500s.

P&S cameras or smartphones are ideal to get the shot of the photographer shooting the bird.

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ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2013, 01:16:06 AM »
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Hi,

I have Sony Alpha 77 and 99 which focus using phase detection, but I guess focusing speed matters with contrast sensing AF. On the other hand contrast based AF has come a long way. EVF delay probably plays a role.

Manual focusing with OVF? Your mileage may vary. Todays OVF are not really built for manual focus.

Best regards
Erik


Thanks for the link, a lot of information.
This site suggest Nikon or Canon 1.5x cropped DSLR. A sales in a near camera store also recommend 7D for its fast auto focus and low light capability. I heard the optical finder, fast and accurate auto focus, genuine, unboosted low light capability, and somewhat larger magnification are the essential property.
Why no recommendation for any m43 or mirror-less? Weak in focus? Low light? Evf delay? Or simply no good Len?
This site also recommends Canon S95 or S110. I thought FZ200 a much more suitable PNS, no? Is this site up to date?

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EinstStein
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2013, 09:29:31 AM »
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Can you share a flying bird picture taken with A77 or A99? Thanks a lot.
OVF for manual focusing? no way. It's for composition only. No retardation is the point. For focusing, I think it has to be the best, if not better, fast and accurate autofocus. 
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EinstStein
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2013, 09:35:53 AM »
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I like your eagle series.
Area these cropped? Why are they from so many different cameras? D800, D600, T4i, ...?
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LesPalenik
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2013, 01:08:44 PM »
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Why not?

When you fill the buffer in one camera, you can grab the next. The secret is to match the cameras with proper lenses. For instance, you put a 600 or 800mm lens on D800, 400mm on D600, 200mm on T4i and as the bird flies by you, you activate the last combo with a 50mm lens. With a good shoulder harness and a little bit of practice, you can easily rotate between 3-4 cameras and harvest 5,000 shots in a few hours.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 02:03:32 PM by LesPalenik » Logged

wildlightphoto
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« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2013, 02:53:55 PM »
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OVF for manual focusing? no way.

Why not?









EDIT: Don't take this seriously, I'm acutely aware that current-model cameras' viewfinders are grossly inadequate for manual focus.  These were made with the Leica R8.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 02:56:30 PM by wildlightphoto » Logged
ErikKaffehr
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« Reply #9 on: November 17, 2013, 03:13:16 PM »
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Hi,

I will check if I see anything useful I can share. Has not been happy with my bird shots lately.

Best regards
Erik


Can you share a flying bird picture taken with A77 or A99? Thanks a lot.
OVF for manual focusing? no way. It's for composition only. No retardation is the point. For focusing, I think it has to be the best, if not better, fast and accurate autofocus. 
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EinstStein
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« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2013, 06:21:51 PM »
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>> OVF for manual focusing? no way.
>>>>Why not? (Douglas Herr bird pictures attached).

Not fair, Douglas Herr not included in my comment. We all know that.
« Last Edit: November 17, 2013, 06:25:33 PM by EinstStein » Logged
EinstStein
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« Reply #11 on: November 27, 2013, 11:47:01 AM »
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Could you share your secrete, what does it take to get this capability?


     
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Isaac
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« Reply #12 on: November 27, 2013, 12:56:11 PM »
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These were made with the Leica R8.

Film or digital back?
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wildlightphoto
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« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2013, 10:11:50 PM »
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Film or digital back?

DMR

Could you share your secrete, what does it take to get this capability?

Practice, a sharp lens, a good viewfinder, and knowing the birds.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2013, 10:13:32 PM by wildlightphoto » Logged
Richowens
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« Reply #14 on: November 29, 2013, 02:28:47 PM »
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 Lots of practice and patience. Then practice some more.
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stever
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« Reply #15 on: November 29, 2013, 07:13:24 PM »
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I've had good luck with the 7D and 100-400.  fast autofocus in tracking mode is critical - the cdaf cameras just aren't fast enough and accurate enough - yet.

a couple important tips - a) use center point focus placed on the birds head and crop for a composition later - although the 7D and a few other cameras can get good results using other focus points, it's too complicated to start with (and some very experienced bird shooters say it's too complicated period) - b) set the camera up so that you focus with your right thumb (using the * button on Canon) rather than the shutter half-press - that makes it much easier to maintain focus while tracking (and even zooming in on the bird) then triggering the shutter in high speed bursts whenever appropriate while still maintaining the thumb down on the focus - c) if possible, use a little higher ISO to let you shoot at f8 for a little more depth of focus
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EinstStein
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« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2013, 12:51:28 AM »
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Some camera can set focusing priority. I assume it means you push the button, and the camera decides when to shoot according to the focusing?
Does this type of camera works with manual focus? does it require the matrix focusing meter (instead of spot meter)?
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wildlightphoto
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« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2013, 11:21:10 AM »
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a couple important tips - a) use center point focus placed on the birds head and crop for a composition later - although the 7D and a few other cameras can get good results using other focus points, it's too complicated to start with (and some very experienced bird shooters say it's too complicated period)

And this is exactly why I don't use autofocus.  I focus on the bird's eye no matter where it is in the viewfinder so that I can compose without relying on cropping.
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EinstStein
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« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2013, 02:01:03 PM »
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I guess once go with EVF, AF is unavoidable? I actually like optical view finder much better.
If I take the optical finder route, do you know any four third camera that has adequate viewfinder?
Leica Digilux 3 comes to my mind, and Olympus E3. That can be the platform for the Telyt 400mm. Do you know how it performs, focusing and viewfinder wise?
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wildlightphoto
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« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2013, 07:14:58 PM »
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I guess once go with EVF, AF is unavoidable? I actually like optical view finder much better.
If I take the optical finder route, do you know any four third camera that has adequate viewfinder?
Leica Digilux 3 comes to my mind, and Olympus E3. That can be the platform for the Telyt 400mm. Do you know how it performs, focusing and viewfinder wise?


No personal experience but several who have tried the Sony a7r are delighted with the EVF for manual focus.
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