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Author Topic: Color capturing cube for digitizing any real world color  (Read 674 times)
paulpeng
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« on: November 20, 2013, 03:20:39 AM »
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Hi everyone. New here, but have been reading cool stuff for yonks.

I thought I would mention the SwatchMate Cube - a gadget which measures real world color and sends the color values to a smartphone or into Photoshop. The video in the link says it all.

Its made for creatives and color nerds, and thought it might be useful for some of you here!

Anyway, just my 2 cents.
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Rand47
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« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2013, 12:03:15 PM »
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Very cool... thanks for sharing!

Rand
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Christoph C. Feldhaim
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There is no rule! No - wait ...


« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2013, 12:43:37 PM »
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Would even be cooler if you'd disclose your connection to this project from the beginning ...
http://www.linkedin.com/in/pengpaul
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robdickinson
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« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2013, 12:53:00 PM »
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Would even be cooler if you'd disclose your connection to this project from the beginning ...
http://www.linkedin.com/in/pengpaul

+1

Now you are just a spammer.
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digitaldog
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« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2013, 05:09:51 PM »
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Is the device capturing spectral data or through RGB filters?
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Andrew Rodney
Author “Color Management for Photographers”
http://digitaldog.net/
paulpeng
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« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2013, 06:09:13 PM »
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@Christoph: My apologies, I did not disclose the relationship specifically, and I should have in hindsight.
@digitaldog: The cube uses an array of RGB filtered photodiodes, rather than capturing the entire spectral data.
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BartvanderWolf
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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2013, 02:11:32 AM »
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The cube uses an array of RGB filtered photodiodes, rather than capturing the entire spectral data.

Hi,

Could you give any indication of how many different filterbands are used? A spectral transmission or sensitivity diagram per filter would be helpful to judge sensitivity to metameric colors.

Cheers,
Bart
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hjulenissen
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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2013, 02:46:15 AM »
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I was fascinated by this graphic:


Is this only about making the reading angular independent?

What is the functional difference between this device and a colorimeter for print calibration?

-h
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paulpeng
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« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2013, 05:13:39 PM »
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Bart, the Cube is essentially a tristimulus colorimeter. As such the photodiodes aren't associated with 'filter bands' on a spectrum per se. Rather, the tristimulus values are derived from a combination of 12 different outputs, each of which can be interpreted to represent a section of the spectrum. Its just that the final output isn't derived from a spectrum. Because the effective light source is identical under each sample, colors with different spectral distributions but which appear the same (ie. metamers) will result in the same output.

hjulenissen, you're right. The use of the spherical enclosure is to ensure the same reading regardless of surface sheen. We found many existing colorimeters don't function well on different sheen levels of the same color, and that this would be an issue when matching, say, the color of a polished tile. Some of the devices made for paint matching also needed to be told whether the surface was shiny or dull (which in itself is quite subjective). For print calibration, this is perhaps less of an issue given the choice of paper is arbitrary, so a matte piece of paper can be used for calibration.
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