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Author Topic: Best way to record GPS data?  (Read 1617 times)
MrSmith27
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« on: November 21, 2013, 12:45:24 PM »
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Hi,

I'm off to a shoot where I would like to know the exact GPS location of my pictures. Problem is my camera is not recording it, so ideally i would need some device that would just continuously record my location and then a software to embed this info into the picture meta data based on matching time stamps. Does this exist?
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AlfSollund
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2013, 04:23:20 PM »
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I use the Geotag Photo Pro app on my android phone while photographing to record GPS data. Once back home I run the app from PC automatically to place GPS data into all my photos. Works great. Only drawback is to remember to start app on mobile phone, and increased power consumption on phone.

http://www.geotagphotos.net/en/android.php
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Misirlou
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2013, 04:37:19 PM »
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There are many ways to do this, but the best solution for you will depend on what kind of equipment you use to shoot, where you will be shooting, and what kind of software you use to process your shots.

There are some inexpensive GPS devices (under $100 US) that do nothing but record GPS tracks. After you're done shooting, you use a software tool that comes with the device to geotag your shots, or you can convert the GPS track log to something Lightroom understands, and let Lightroom do it. It's important to make sure you set your camera clock as precisely as you can, because the geotagging software relies on shot time to link to the coordinates of where the GPS device was at that same time.

I have one of those inexpensive GPS devices, called an "iMOD" I believe, but I don't use it very much now. Instead, I use an even less expensive iPhone app to record the GPS tracks, and then geotag the photos with Lightroom. The only disadvantage to that process is that some kinds of phones cannot record a GPS track unless they are actively connected to a cell phone network. I've never had a problem like that with my iPhones, even in the Rocky mountains.

And recently, I bought a Canon 6D with GPS built in, which solves the problem forever.
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AFairley
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2013, 05:50:51 PM »
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Also there are a number of GPS receivers that plug directly into cameras that support the capability and the information is embedded in the files by the camera at the time of capture.

http://dawntech.hk/shop/
http://www.aokatec.com/index.html

there are others, too
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markmullen
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« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2013, 05:17:38 PM »
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I've got two gps loggers, an AMOD and a Sony, both just hang on your kit bag and record your position once a second, I use Houdah Geo to tag my shots, it is pretty quick to do, once the raw files are tagged the location follows any resulting files, for me from C1 into CS6 as a tiff, then out as jpegs, they're all tagged.

I prefer to do it that way as it keeps precious battery life for my iphone, the AMOD uses 3x AAA batteries, the Sony 1x AA and both manage a full day of shooting when using good quality batteries.
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stever
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« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2013, 11:32:52 PM »
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I've been using the Amod for a few years and have been very satisfied.  I use Downloader Pro to re-number the images and put the coordinates in the sidecar file.  I often shoot 2 and sometimes 3 cameras so separating the gps device from the cameras works well (just be sure you've got the date and time synched for all cameras).
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Rhossydd
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« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2013, 01:32:58 AM »
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I use a GPS data logger, a cheap one off eBay, and also sometimes use my Sat Nav which is set to save GPS tracks. Then use the track in Lightroom to tag the GPS data onto the image metadata. I've also used other software in the past too.

Matching camera time with GPS time is important, but I've found the best way is to record a track point and take a shot of the GPS when you do it, one for each camera. This allows you to work out the time off set between camera and GPS and use that when applying metadata. Trying to set the camera to GPS time has been futile in my experience as daylight savings and international time zones aren't well accounted for by software, just don't change the camera time once you've shot the track point for sync.
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Hans Kruse
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« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2013, 06:30:19 AM »
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I use http://gps4cam.com/ in my iPhone and that works quite well. I do the geotagging in Lightroom using the exported GPX tracklog from the iPhone. It uses the GPS chip in the phone to record the GPS coordinates. I use the iPhone as navigation device as well in the car, so when I go out shooting away fromt he car I put the phone in my pocket. The phone is therefore always charged since the car holder is charging the phone. I use the geotagged photos from locations for navigating via the TomTom navigation app as well (even maps as screen shot from Google Maps can be geotagged in Lightroom) and the photos are then published to HD and then synchronized with iTunes to the phone. Maybe the answer was a little extended compared to the question Grin
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John Koerner
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« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2013, 08:26:56 PM »
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I just use Lightroom to Geotag the RAW files of my 7D or Powershot G15.

Then, after I process the files further, I export the .tiffs (or .jpegs) for digital use, which now have the Geotags in their EXIF data.
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Lightsmith
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« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2013, 05:14:44 PM »
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I have used the Aokatec GPS receiver that plugs into my Nikon cameras to automatically tag my pictures. Cost with shipping was under $100. It uses the camera's battery and has a switch to turn it off when not in use.
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AFairley
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« Reply #10 on: December 05, 2013, 09:10:27 AM »
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I have used the Aokatec GPS receiver that plugs into my Nikon cameras to automatically tag my pictures. Cost with shipping was under $100. It uses the camera's battery and has a switch to turn it off when not in use.

I had the Aokatec, but it really drained the battertpy in my D800e.  I now use a similar unit from di-GPS.com which although about twice as expensive has about 1/3 of the current draw and also locks fix much faster, 30 seconds or less where the Aokatec would take several minutes in the same location. Also much easier to attach and lock with the screwin lock ring.  However, it does not have the on-off switch. Highly recommended. 
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MrSmith27
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« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2013, 03:40:02 AM »
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I use http://gps4cam.com/ in my iPhone and that works quite well. I do the geotagging in Lightroom using the exported GPX tracklog from the iPhone. It uses the GPS chip in the phone to record the GPS coordinates. I use the iPhone as navigation device as well in the car, so when I go out shooting away fromt he car I put the phone in my pocket. The phone is therefore always charged since the car holder is charging the phone. I use the geotagged photos from locations for navigating via the TomTom navigation app as well (even maps as screen shot from Google Maps can be geotagged in Lightroom) and the photos are then published to HD and then synchronized with iTunes to the phone. Maybe the answer was a little extended compared to the question Grin

I downloaded and used this. Process seems simple enough, however I haven't really run the software yet. If it works though, that $3 app just saved me hundreds of dollars on useless extra equipment. It also doesn't drain too much battery. I run it on my old 3GS and it pretty much lasted about 15 hrs which is enough, unless you are in the real wilderness.
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Lightsmith
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« Reply #12 on: December 08, 2013, 08:11:16 PM »
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The new model of the Aokatec that does not require and external Bluetooth GPS receiver draws a lot less than the old one with Bluetooth. I have both and there is a great deal of difference. The only time I have had a problem with a battery is when I left the Aokatec switched on.

The old one with Bluetooth used in combination with a Holex GPS receiver was a lot faster to acquire satellite signals and set the position. Not surprising as the Holex is a lot larger even though it is still the size of a small box of matches at about 1x2x0.5 inches. I put the Holex in a pocket and leave it on all day as it has more than 24 hours of battery power and is fast to recharge with a USB cable. 
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